Tag Archives: Traceability

Marketing of feed

Marketing of feed

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Marketing of feed

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal nutrition

Marketing of feed

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 767/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 July 2009 on the placing on the market and use of feed, amending European Parliament and Council Regulation (EC) No 1831/2003 and repealing Council Directive 79/373/EEC, Commission Directive 80/511/EEC, Council Directives 82/471/EEC, 83/228/EEC, 93/74/EEC, 93/113/EC and 96/25/EC and Commission Decision 2004/217/EC.

Summary

This Regulation lays down rules on the placing on the market and use of feed for food-producing animals or pets. It also lays down labelling, packaging and presentation requirements.

Feed

This Regulation covers feed, i.e. any substance or product, including additives, whether processed, partially processed or unprocessed, intended to be used for oral feeding to animals.

It applies without prejudice to provisions in the field of animal nutrition concerning:

  • medicated feedingstuffs;
  • undesirable substances;
  • transmissible spongiform encephalopathies;
  • animal by-products not intended for human consumption;
  • genetically modified food and feed;
  • the traceability and labelling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs);
  • additives; and
  • the production and labelling of organic products.

Marketing and use

Animal feed shall comply with safety and marketing requirements. In particular, it shall:

  • be safe;
  • not have a direct adverse effect on the environment or animal welfare;
  • be sound, genuine, unadulterated, fit for purpose and of merchantable quality;
  • be labelled, packaged and presented in accordance with the applicable legislation; and
  • comply with the technical provisions on impurities and other chemical determinants (see Annex I to the Regulation).

Feed shall not contain materials whose placing on the market or use is restricted or prohibited (see Annex III to the Regulation).

The traceability of feed shall be guaranteed at all stages of production, processing and distribution. Feed business operators must therefore be capable of identifying any person who has provided them with feed, a food-producing animal or any substance intended or likely to be incorporated into feed.

Feed which is or is likely to be placed on the market in the European Community shall be labelled or identified appropriately in order to facilitate its traceability.

If the feed business operator considers that a feed does not meet the feed safety requirements, it shall immediately initiate the procedures for withdrawing the feed in question from the market. It shall then inform the competent authorities and users without delay.

Labelling and presentation

This Regulation establishes general provisions for the labelling and presentation of all feed, such as the obligation to indicate:

  • the type of feed;
  • the name and address of the operator;
  • the batch or lot reference number;
  • the net weight;
  • the list of additives used; and
  • the moisture content.

The labelling and presentation of feed must not mislead the user concerning the intended use or characteristics of the feed. The mandatory labelling particulars shall be clearly visible on the packaging, the container, on a label attached thereto or on the document accompanying the feed. The particulars shall be clearly legible and indelible. They shall be given in at least one of the official languages of the Member State or region in which the feed is marketed.

Specific labelling requirements are laid down for feed materials, compound feed and “dietetic” feed. All claims relating to feed must be duly justified.

The labelling of pet food shall include a telephone number for customers wishing to know more about the ingredients used.

Packaging

Feed materials and compound feed shall be placed on the market in sealed packages and containers.

However, certain feed may be placed on the market in bulk or in unsealed packages or containers. This derogation concerns:

  • feed materials;
  • mixtures of grain and whole fruit;
  • deliveries between producers of compound feed;
  • compound feed delivered by the producer to the user or packaging firms;
  • quantities of compound feed not exceeding 50 kilograms in weight which are intended for the final user and are taken directly from a sealed package or container; and
  • blocks or licks.

Community Catalogue of feed materials

The Community Catalogue of feed materials is intended to improve the labelling of feed materials and compound feed. For each material listed, it includes the following particulars:

  • the name;
  • the identification number;
  • a description (including information on the manufacturing process); and
  • a glossary of definitions.

Community Codes of good labelling practice

Stakeholders are also encouraged to create Community Codes of exemplary practice in the context of optional labelling: one for pet food and one for compound feed for food-producing animals.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 767/2009

21.9.2009

OJ L 229 of 1.9.2009

Subsequent amendments and corrections to Regulation (EC) No 767/2009 have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated versionhas a purely documentary value”.

DEROGATION FROM THE ACT

Regulation (EU) No 454/2010 [Official Journal L 128 du 27.5.2010].
Feed intended for pet animals which is labelled in accordance with Directive 79/373/EEC and Article 16 of Directive 70/524/EEC may be placed on the market until 31 August 2011.

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EU) No 242/2010 of 19 March 2010 creating the Catalogue of feed materials [Official Journal L 77 of 24.3.2010].

Unique identifiers for GMOs

Unique identifiers for GMOs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Unique identifiers for GMOs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Specific themes

Unique identifiers for GMOs

Document or Iniciative

Commission Regulation (EC) No 65/2004 of 14 January 2004, establishing a system for the development and assignment of unique identifiers for genetically modified organisms.

Summary

Scope

The Regulation applies to all genetically modified organisms that will be imported into the Community for cultivation and for human food and animal feed, except medicinal products for human and veterinary use.

Authorisation to place on the market

Since the beginning of the 1990s, the placing on the market of genetically modified organisms has been regulated by Directive 90/220/EEC. Since 1997, the regulations on GMOs, limited to Directive 90/220/EEC (covering the import, processing and cultivation of GMOs and their use in animal feed) have been strengthened by a Regulation concerning novel foods and novel food ingredients intended for human food (Regulation 97/258/EC).

The regulatory framework for GMOs was amended and updated by the adoption of Directive 2001/18/EC repealing the above-mentioned Directive 90/220/EEC, and by the adoption of two Regulations, one relating to GMOs in human food and animal feed (Regulation 1829/2003/EC) and the other to the labelling and traceability of GMOs (Regulation 1830/2003/EC).

All GMOs must be assessed before they can be sown or placed on the market. This risk assessment is carried out on a case-by-case basis and examines the expected or unexpected possible effects that the GMO is likely to have on health and on the environment. Therefore, effects linked to a GMO’s potential toxicity/allergenicity or its effects on non-target organisms for example are evaluated by national and Community scientific bodies (including the European Food Safety Authority).

Once GMO products have been authorised to be placed on the market (Directive 2001/18/EC or Regulation 1829/2003), the appropriate identifier unique to each GMO must be included on the labelling.

The identifier is made up of 9 characters, including letters and numbers, combined in a uniform way (see the Regulation’s annex). This format was approved within the framework of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The identifier for each specific GMO is therefore listed in the OECD’s BioTrack database.

The Commission or the authority that approved the product’s marketing must inform the Biosafety Clearing-House (set up under the Cartagena Biosafety Protocol) in writing of this unique identifier.

Context

The unique identifier is a GMO identification measure that is also linked to labelling and which facilitates the traceability of these products throughout the food chain, in application of Regulation 1830/2003.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 65/2004 16/01/2004 OJ L 10 of 16/01/2004

Related Acts

Regulation (EC) No 641/2004 of the Commission of 6 April 2004 on detailed rules for the implementation of Regulation (EC) No 1829/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the application for the authorisation of new genetically modified food and feed, the notification of existing products and adventitious or technically unavoidable presence of genetically modified material which has benefited from a favourable risk evaluation (Official Journal L 102 of 07/04/2004).


Regulation (EC) No 1830

of the European Parliament and of the Council of 22 September 2003 concerning the traceability and labelling of genetically modified organisms and the traceability of food and feed products produced from genetically modified organisms and amending Directive 2001/18/EC (Official Journal L 268 of 18/10/2003).

 

Information on the payer accompanying transfers of funds

Information on the payer accompanying transfers of funds

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Information on the payer accompanying transfers of funds

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Single market for capital

Information on the payer accompanying transfers of funds

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 1781/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council dated 15 November 2006 on information on the payer accompanying transfers of funds * .

Summary

This Regulation lays down rules aimed at establishing the traceability of transfers of funds *. These rules will be applicable to all payment service providers (PSP) involved in the payment chain. The This Regulation aims to transpose into Community legislation Special Recommendation VII on “wire transfers” (SR VII) of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF *).

The Regulation does not apply to transfers of funds * which flow from a commercial transaction carried out using a credit or debit card or any other similar payment instrument, provided that a unique identifier allowing the transaction to be traced back to the payer accompanies all transfers of funds flowing from that commercial transaction and that the beneficiary has entered into agreement with the payment service provider enabling the payment of the provision of goods and services.

Furthermore, under the same conditions as the previous point, this regulation does not apply to transfers of funds carried out via a mobile telephone or any other digital device or linked to IT, when the payments are post paid and insofar as the payment service provider must comply with obligations stated by Directive 2005/60/EC.

In addition, the Regulation will not apply to transfers of funds where both the payer * and the payee * are payment service providers acting on their own behalf.

Under the Regulation, the payer’s payment service provider * (PSP) must ensure that transfers of funds contain complete, accurate and meaningful information on the payer. Any intermediary PSP must also ensure that all information on the payer that accompanies a transfer is transferred with it or retained in an appropriate manner.

In turn, any payment service provider * of the payer must report suspicious transactions to the authorities responsible for combating money laundering and terrorist financing. The payee’s PSP must be able to detect a lack of presence of information on the payer when receiving transfers and must take appropriate steps to correct this situation (refuse the transfer or ask for further information) so that received transfers of funds do not remain anonymous.

Accordingly, the name, address and account number of the person ordering the payment must always accompany the transfer. Access to this information will be granted to the competent authorities only for the purposes of preventing, investigating, detecting and prosecuting money laundering or terrorist financing.

An open consultation exercise on this Regulation was conducted online between 2 December 2003 and 15 February 2004. The Commission received 103 replies. The results are available on the website of the Directorate-General for the Internal Market.

Context: combating terrorist financing

In the European Union’s revised Plan of Action to Combat Terrorism (PDF ) of 18 June 2004, the Council emphasised the importance of adopting measures designed to prevent the phenomenon of terrorist financing. The European Council of 25 March 2004 called on the Member States “to increase cooperation between national competent authorities, financial intelligence units and private financial institutions to facilitate improved exchange of information on terrorist financing”.

In that same statement, the Council also asked the Commission to consider improvements on the regulation and transparency of non-profit bodies so as to prevent them from being used by terrorists to acquire funding for their activities.

For its part, the Commission adopted a communicationon prevention in this field in October 2004 and unveiled in December of that year the Union’s strategy for combating terrorist financing. This document, drawn up on the basis of the proposals made jointly by the Commission and the Secretary-General High Representative, takes stock of measures implemented in this field and contains a list of recommendations for strengthening action by the Union.

Key terms used in the act
  • “Payee”: A natural or legal person who is the intended final recipient of transferred funds.
  • “Payer”: a natural or legal person who is the account holder and who allows a transfer of funds to leave the aforementioned account, or in the absence of an account, the natural or legal person who gives the order to carry out a transfer of funds.
  • FAFT: The intergovernmental body responsible for designing and promoting, at both national and international level, strategies to combat money laundering and terrorism financing.
  • “Payment service provider” (PSP): A natural or legal person whose business includes the provision of fund transfer services.
  • “Intermediary payment service provider”: A payment service provider which is neither that of the payer nor that of the payee and which participates in the execution of transfers of funds.
  • “Transfer of funds”: Any transaction carried out on behalf of a payer through a payment service provider by electronic means with a view to making funds available to a payee at another payment service provider, irrespective of whether the payer and the payee are the same person.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation on information on the payer accompanying transfers of funds 1.1.07 OJ L 345 of 8 December 2006

Related Acts

Directive 2005/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on 26 October 2005 on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the purpose of money laundering and terrorist financing [Official Journal L 309 of 25.11.2005].

Commission Communication to the Council, the European Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee – The prevention of and fight against terrorist financing through enhanced national high-level coordination and greater transparency of the non-profit sector

COM(2005) 620 final

– Official Journal C 122, 23.5.2006].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 20 October 2004 on the prevention of and the fight against terrorist financing through measures to improve the exchange of information, to strengthen transparency and to enhance the traceability of financial transactions

COM(2004) 700 final

– Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 20 October 2004 – Prevention, preparedness and response to terrorist attacks

COM(2004) 698 final

– Not published in the Official Journal].

Council Regulation (EC) No

2580/2001

of 27 December 2001 on specific restrictive measures directed against certain persons and entities with a view to combating terrorism [Official Journal L 344 of 28.12.2001].

Directive

97/5/EC
(BG) (CS) (ET) (GA) (LV) (LT) (HU) (MT) (PL) (RO) (SK) (SL)
of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 January 1997 on cross-border credit transfers [Official Journal L 43 of 14.2.1997].

Fair Trade and non-governmental trade-related sustainability assurance schemes

Fair Trade and non-governmental trade-related sustainability assurance schemes

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Fair Trade and non-governmental trade-related sustainability assurance schemes

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Development > Sectoral development policies

Fair Trade and non-governmental trade-related sustainability assurance schemes

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee of 5 May 2009 – Contributing to Sustainable Development: the role of Fair Trade and non-governmental trade-related sustainability assurance schemes [COM(2009) 215 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Following the 1999 Communication on Fair Trade, the Commission presented a report on the developments in the sector.

Since then a single international brand has replaced national Fair Trade certification labels in the Member States. The introduction of this brand has strengthened consumer confidence and recognition of Fair Trade products. In 2009 between 60 % and 70 % of global sales of Fair Trade products were made in the European Union (EU).

The growth of the sector has encouraged the development of new sustainability schemes. Fair Trade * is based on economic, environmental and social development. Private trade-related *
sustainability schemes are based on at least one of these three pillars.

The definition of Fair Trade is based on common criteria, which form part of an integrated approach to sustainable development. They concern:

  • the definition of a fair price which covers the costs of sustainable production and living and the possibility for part payments to be made to producers in advance;
  • the establishment of long-term relations between producers and distributors;
  • transparency and traceability throughout the supply chain;
  • compliance with the International Labour Organization’s (ILO) core conventions, specifically with regard to decent work, trade union freedom and labour standards;
  • respect for human rights, the environment and traditional methods;
  • building production capacity and developing market access for producers;
  • raising the awareness of stakeholders and consumers on the aims and operation of Fair Trade;
  • establishing a certification process;
  • impact assessments of Fair Trade activities.

Private trade-related sustainability schemes also offer possibilities for growth and sustainable development. The Commission considers that certain measures could improve their results. It seems necessary to preserve the non-governmental nature of the organisations setting up these schemes in order to encourage synergies between the different schemes and to increase their visibility. It is also necessary to reach a common definition of the basic requirements of these schemes and to develop impact assessment criteria.

Private sustainability schemes are compatible with the principles of the multilateral trading system. The World Trade Organization (WTO) and EU trade policy support the integration of developing countries into the global economy. However, the awarding of Fair Trade labels should comply with the WTO obligations concerning the principles of transparency and non-discrimination.

Public procurement contracts represent 16 % of the EU GDP. Their procedures should comply to a greater extent with the principles of sustainable development. In 2009, the Commission published a Communication on Green Public Procurement. In addition, a guide on social procurement is currently being produced. It recommends that Fair Trade criteria be considered in public tenders.

Through its development cooperation instruments, the EU supports non-governmental organisations carrying out Fair Trade activities. Between 2007 and 2008 the EU provided

funding of EUR 19.466 million for actions specifically related to raising awareness of Fair Trade. Such actions are also carried out under the framework of support for developing agricultural, rural and trade sectors through the Special Framework for Assistance to traditional ACP suppliers of bananas
and signatory countries to the Sugar Protocol.

In the coming years, additional efforts should enable EU aid for the development of Fair Trade schemes to be increased. The Commission proposes to improve the current interventions by evaluating the assistance provided, carrying out impact assessments and promoting market transparency.

Key terms
  • Fair Trade: a term which applies to organisations whose operations comply with standards established by the international standard setting and conformity assessment organisations, that are members of the International Social and Environment Accreditations and Labelling Alliance (ISEAL).
  • Private sustainability assurance schemes: a term used to describe labelling schemes that aim to inform consumers about the sustainability of the production of the product.