Tag Archives: Slovenia

Enlargement 2004 and 2007

Enlargement 2004 and 2007

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Enlargement 2004 and 2007

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Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007

Enlargement 2004 and 2007

The fifth enlargement is historic and unprecedented in the history of the European Union. The ten Central and Eastern European countries, together with Cyprus and Malta, joined the EU in two successive waves in 2004 and 2007. In this context, the EU paved the way for the current enlargement process by establishing suitable instruments to be able to respond not only to the needs of the candidate countries, but also to the specific needs of the EU to receive them.

  • Bulgaria – adoption of the community acquis
  • Romania – adoption of the community acquis
  • Cyprus – adoption of the community acquis
  • Estonia – adoption of the community acquis
  • Hungary – adoption of the community acquis
  • Latvia – adoption of the community acquis
  • Lithuania – adoption of the community acquis
  • Malta – adoption of the community acquis
  • Poland – adoption of the community acquis
  • Czech republic – adoption of the community acquis
  • Slovakia – adoption of the community acquis
  • Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis
  • Partnership for the accession of Cyprus
  • Partnership for the accession of Estonia
  • Partnership for the accession of Hungary
  • Partnership for the accession of Latvia
  • Partnership for the accession of Lithuania
  • Partnership for the accession of Malta
  • Partnership for the accession of Poland
  • Partnership for the accession of the Czech Republic
  • Partnership for the accession of Slovakia
  • Partnership for the accession of Slovenia

HISTORY OF EASTERN ENLARGEMENT

General Provisions

  • The 2004 enlargement: the challenge of a 25-member EU
  • Enlargement, two years after – an economic success
  • The communication strategy on enlargement
  • Participation of the Central and Eastern European candidate countries in Community programmes
  • The challenge of enlargement
  • Agenda 2000: for a stronger and wider Union

Sectoral approach

  • Enlargement of the euro area after 1 May 2004
  • Joint assessments of employment policies in the candidate countries
  • Community response to the flooding in central Europe
  • Strengthening administrative and judicial capacity
  • Nuclear safety in the Newly Independent States and Central and Eastern Europe
  • Accession strategies for the environment
  • Community action for regions bordering the candidate countries

PRE-ACCESSION INSTRUMENTS 2000-2006

  • Phare Programme
  • Pre-accession agricultural instrument (SAPARD)
  • Instrument for structural policy for pre-accession
  • Cross-border cooperation programme
  • Coordination instrument

ENLARGEMENT 2007

  • Roadmaps for Bulgaria and Romania

Bulgaria

  • Partnership for the accession of Bulgaria

Romania

  • The Accession Partnership with Romania

ENLARGEMENT 2004

Cyprus

  • Partnership for the accession of Cyprus

Estonia

  • Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Hungary

  • Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Latvia

  • Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Lithuania

  • Partnership for the accession of Lithuania

Malta

  • Partnership for the accession of Malta

Poland

  • Partnership for the accession of Poland

Czech Republic

  • Partnership for the accession of the Czech Republic

Slovakia

  • Partnership for the accession of Slovakia

Slovenia

  • Partnership for the accession of Slovenia

Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

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Placeholder Slovenia

placeholder Slovenia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about placeholder Slovenia

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Research and innovation > Research and innovation: international dimension and enlargement

placeholder Slovenia

Slovenia authorised to join the euro zone

Slovenia authorised to join the euro zone

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Slovenia authorised to join the euro zone

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Economic and monetary affairs > Institutional and economic framework of the euro

Slovenia authorised to join the euro zone (2007)

Document or Iniciative

Council Decision 2006/495/EC of 11 July 2006 in accordance with Article 122(2) of the Treaty on the adoption by Slovenia of the single currency on 1 January 2007 [Official Journal L 195, 15 July 2006].

Summary

With this Decision the Council authorises Slovenia to introduce the euro on 1 January 2007. The Council notes that Slovenia fulfils the necessary conditions for the adoption of the single currency – i.e. the convergence criteria.

Fulfilment of the convergence criteria

On 2 March 2006, Slovenia submitted a formal request for a convergence assessment. The European Commission’s conclusions are as follows:

  • Slovenian national legislation, including the Statutes of the national central bank, is compatible with Articles 108 and 109 of the Treaty establishing the European Community and with the Statutes of the European System of Central Banks (ESCB);
  • the average inflation rate in Slovenia in the year ending March 2006 remained stable at 2.3 percent, which is below the reference value, and is likely to continue to do so in the months ahead;
  • Slovenia is not the subject of a Council Decision on excessive government deficit;
  • Slovenia has been a member of the European Exchange-Rate Mechanism (ERM II) since 28 June 2004 and during that period the Slovenian tolar (SIT) has remained stable without any extreme fluctuations;
  • the long-term interest rate has remained, on average, at around 3.8 percent, i.e. below the reference value.

The European Commission deems that Slovenia has achieved a high degree of sustainable convergence by reference to these criteria. Slovenia consequently fulfils the necessary conditions for the adoption of the single currency.

Adoption of the single currency

The Council, acting by a qualified majority, notes with this Decision that Slovenia fulfils the necessary conditions for the adoption of the euro. The derogation in favour of Slovenia referred to in Article 4 [PDF ] of the 2003 Act of Accession is repealed with effect from 1 January 2007. The Decision is addressed to the Member States of the EU.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 2006/495/EC 15.7.2006 OJ C 195 of 15.7.2006

Slovenia

Slovenia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Slovenia

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Competition > Competition: international dimension and enlargement

Slovenia

1) References

Commission Opinion [COM(97) 2010 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(98) 709 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(99) 512 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2000) 712 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1755 – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1411 – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1208 – Not published in the Official Journal]
Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236 of 23.09.2003]

2) Summary

In its July 1997 Opinion, the Commission took the view that current Slovene legislation on restrictive agreements was unsatisfactory and that the competition protection office needed to be strengthened if the law was to be effectively enforced. As for State aid, the Commission found that satisfactory information and monitoring systems did not yet exist and invited Slovenia to make a major effort over the medium term to meet the conditions laid down by the Community.

The November 1998 Report noted that, despite some progress in implementing legislation on restrictive agreements, administrative capacity needed to be improved in order to ensure effective enforcement of competition law. As far as State aid was concerned, the Report called for considerable efforts to align legislation, establish an inventory and make the monitoring authority operational.

The October 1999 Report indicated that encouraging progress had been made. Slovenia must consolidate this progress, particularly in the State aid field.

The November 2000 Report noted that Slovenia had made considerable progress during the year as a result of the entry into force of the new antitrust law and the framework law on State aid control.

The November 2001 Report took the view that Slovenia had continued to make progress, in particular in the field of State aid. The competition protection office and the Commission for the Control of State aid were implementing the new antitrust and State aid laws. In addition, the report and aid inventory were also of good quality.

The October 2002 Report considered that Slovenia had made further progress in the field but that it should implement the provisions on State aid and the financial resources for the Competition Protection Office.

The November 2003 Report stated that, although Slovenia was expected to be in a position to implement the acquis in the field of State aid, further progress was needed in the antitrust sector. The legislation should be amended so as to enable the Competition Protection Office to impose effective and deterrent fines.
The Treaty of Accession was signed on 16 April 2003 and accession took place on 1 May 2004.

COMMUNITY ACQUIS

European Community rules on competition stem from Article 3(g) of the EC Treaty, which states that the activities of the Community must include “a system ensuring that competition in the internal market is not distorted”. The main areas of application are restrictive agreements and State aid.

The Europe Agreement with Slovenia, which came into force on 1 February 1995, provides (i) for a competition regime to be applied in trade relations between the Community and Slovenia and based on the requirements set out in Articles 81, 82 and 87 of the EC Treaty (formerly Articles 85, 86 and 92) concerning agreements between undertakings, abuses of dominant position and State aid, and (ii) for implementing rules in these fields to be adopted within three years of the entry into force of the Agreement.

Furthermore, the Agreement requires Slovenia to make its rules on competition compatible with those of the Community.

The White Paper refers to the progressive application of the above provisions and of those contained in the Merger Regulation (4064/89) and in Articles 31 (formerly Article 37) and 86 (formerly Article 90) concerning monopolies and special rights of the EC Treaty.

EVALUATION

Significant progress has been made in the field of restrictive agreements by the adoption of the new antitrust law in 2000. Slovene legislation is now in line with most of the acquis provisions and EC legislation. However, the competition protection office must put in place a more dissuasive policy in respect of serious distortions of competition rules. It must also ensure that the courts apply the rules effectively.

Following the entry into force in 2000 of the new State aid framework law, Slovenia is now largely in line with the acquis. The Commission for the Control of State Aid is the institution responsible for implementing the new State aid legislation.

Slovenia has continued to progress in adopting legislation on State aid and the development of the administrative capacity of the Commission for the Control of State Aid. In order to complete preparations for membership, Slovenia must, as a priority, further strengthen its administrative capacity so as to ensure credible enforcement of the antitrust rules.

Negotiations on the current chapter are provisionally closed (see 2002 Report). Slovenia must now continue to update its alignment measures as the acquis in this field develops.

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 


Another Normative about Slovenia

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

Slovenia

1) References

Commission Opinion [COM(97) 2010 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(98) 709 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(99) 512 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2000) 712 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [SEC(2001) 1755 – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1208 – Not published in the Official Journal].
Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236 of 23.09.2003]

2) Summary

In its Opinion of July 1997, the European Commission was optimistic about the medium-term outlook for bringing Slovenian legislation into line with the Community acquis, provided the legislative work was pursued. Hence it invited Slovenia to adopt a Consumer Protection Act, as well as a certain number of amendments designed to reinforce consumer protection, notably as regards general product safety.

However, the November 1998 Report noted that no major effort had been made to adopt the acquis and emphasised that many of the standards adopted were not fully in line with Community legislation.

In its October 1999 Report, the Commission considered that Slovenia had made some progress and stressed the need to improve administrative structures, particularly with regard to market surveillance.

The October 2002 Report highlighted progress by Slovenia in aligning its consumer protection legislation and in developing the administrative capacity required in this field. Negotiations on this chapter have been provisionally concluded. Slovenia has not asked for any transitional provisions in this field.

The October 2003 Report indicates that Slovenia complies with most of the Community acquis concerning safety-related and non-safety-related measures. However, it still has to transpose the revised Directive on general product safety (safety-related measures) and effectively apply all its legislation concerning non-safety-related measures.
The Treaty of Accession was signed on 16 April 2003 and accession took place on 1 May 2004.

COMMUNITY ACQUIS

The Community acquis covers the protection of consumers’ economic interests (notably in the fields of misleading advertising, indication of prices, consumer credit, unfair contract terms, distance selling, package travel, and timeshares), general product safety, cosmetics safety, the labelling of textile products and toy safety.

The European Association Agreement provides for aligning the legislation with Community law and for cooperation measures to bring Slovenian consumer protection law fully into line with the Community rules. The measures set out in the first phase of the White Paper on the Central and Eastern European Countries and the Internal Market (1995) focus on the improvement of product safety, notably in respect of cosmetics, textiles and toys, and on the protection of consumers’ economic interests, mainly in the field of misleading advertising, consumer credit, unfair contract terms, and indication of prices. The second-phase measures concern package travel and timeshares. New, recently adopted Community legislation (distance selling, comparative advertising and indication of prices) must also be transposed.

EVALUATION

Non-safety-related measures

The adoption of amendments to the law on consumer protection adopted in 1998, which should transpose a number of Community Directives, primarily in non-safety-related fields, has progressed well, except with regard to the acquis on misleading and comparative advertising.

One part of the Community acquis concerning non-safety-related measures has still to be transposed: namely, the aforementioned legislation on misleading and comparative advertising and the use of languages in commercial communications aimed at consumers.

It is also necessary to increase the human and financial resources of the Consumer Protection Office and the other administrative bodies in this area.

The Slovene Government must also give more support to the promotion and setting up of alternative dispute-settlement systems.

Consumer associations

The role of non-governmental organisations must be promoted so that they take part in the implementation of consumer policy, particularly the development of product safety standards.

The Government must also increase the human and financial resources of these organisations and clearly define their tasks and those of the Consumer Protection Office.

Safety-related measures

Slovenia has transposed the acquis concerning safety-related measures apart from the revised Directive on general product safety.

Moreover, action still needs to be taken to improve the capability and coordination of the main bodies responsible for market surveillance. The human and financial resources of the market surveillance system, which consists of five institutions responsible for consumer protection, should also be increased.

In order to complete its preparations for accession, Slovenia’s efforts must therefore concentrate on improving the administrative structures in place so that they can effectively carry out their market surveillance tasks.

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.


Another Normative about Slovenia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

Slovenia

1) References

Commission opinion [COM(97) 2010 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(98) 709 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(99) 512 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2000) 712 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1755 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1411 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission report [COM(2003) 675 final – SEC (2003) 1208 – Not published in the Official Journal]
Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236 of 23.09.2003]

2) Summary

In its July 1997 opinion, the European Commission concluded that as regards farming legislation, Slovenia still had work to do on alignment with the EU, although significant progress had been made in adopting the measures listed in the 1995 White Paper White Paper on the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Internal Market..

Particular effort was needed in the following areas:

  • improving structural and rural-development policy;
  • enforcing veterinary and phytosanitary rules and upgrading infrastructure to meet EU standards – especially important in the context of inspection and control arrangements at the EU’s external borders;
  • strengthening the administrative framework to guarantee the necessary capacity for implementing and enforcing the CAP (Common Agricultural Policy);
  • further restructuring the farming and agri-food sector to boost its competitiveness.

The Commission finished by noting that Slovenia’s accession to the European Union should not be a major problem in the medium term as far as implementation of the CAP was concerned, provided the improvements listed above were made. As regards fisheries, the Commission concluded that, with its relatively low output and foreign trade, the Slovenian fisheries sector would not have a significant impact on the EU as a whole.

The November 1998 report called for further efforts from Slovenia to align its farming legislation and reform its farming sector to the CAP and the EU’s agri-food standards. The structures necessary for implementing rural and structural policy needed to be put in place as quickly as possible. In the fisheries sector, the report noted a lack of progress.

In its October 1999 report, the Commission concluded that while some progress towards alignment with EU farming legislation had been made, a great deal of work remained in transposing and implementing legislation. No progress had been made in the fisheries sector.

The November 2000 report flagged up significant progress made by Slovenia in both farming and fisheries.

The November 2001 report highlighted the progress made by Slovenia in the farming sector, while underlining that extensive efforts still had to be made.
In fisheries, Slovenia has made progress in its efforts to standardise legislation, adopting a Maritime Code in March 2001. This established a sound legal basis for the monitoring of fishing vessels and the creation of a fishing fleet register. As regards the management, inspection and control of stocks, a Department for Freshwater and Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture had been created within the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food. Also in 2001, the Fisheries Institute was converted into a Fisheries Research Institute, intended in time to be the main source of scientific advice on marine resources.

The November 2002 report highlighted the progress made by Slovenia in aligning its farming legislation and expanding its administrative infrastructure, especially in the veterinary and plant-health fields. In fisheries, progress had been made on both the legislative and the administrative fronts.

The November 2003 report shows that Slovenia has met some of its commitments. With regard to the common organisations of the markets in sugar and milk and certain aspects of the veterinary field, an effort is still required to ensure that everything will be ready and operational on accession. Slovenia has met most of its commitments as regards fisheries.

COMMUNITYACQUIS

The Common Agricultural Policy is designed to maintain and develop a modern farming system that ensures both a fair standard of living for farmers and a supply of food at reasonable prices for consumers, as well as guaranteeing free movement of goods within the EU.

The Europe Agreement, which provides the legal basis for agricultural trade between Poland and the EU, aims to promote cooperation on modernising, restructuring and privatising Poland’s farming and agri-food sectors and its plant-health standards. The 1995 White Paper on the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Internal Market covers legislation on veterinary, plant-health and animal-nutrition controls, as well as marketing requirements for individual commodities. The purpose of this legislation is to protect consumers, public health and animal and plant health.

The Common Fisheries Policy covers market-organisation regimes, structural policy, agreements with non-member countries, management and conservation of fish stocks and scientific research in support of these activities.

Trade with the EU in fishery products is covered in the Europe Agreement but not the White Paper.

EVALUATION

Agriculture

Slovenia has met most of its commitments. The rules on the common organisations of the markets in sugar and milk are not totally in line with the acquis. The same holds true for veterinary control systems in the internal market, trade in live animals and livestock products in the veterinary field, the protection of public health and common measures. Unless intense efforts are made in these areas, Slovenia will not be ready in time.

Fisheries

Slovenia has met most of its commitments as regards fisheries. Alignment with the acquis must be completed with regard to the fishing fleet register and the common organisation of the market. Staffing levels must be increased to improve administrative capacity.

 


Another Normative about Slovenia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Slovenia – adoption of the community acquis

Slovenia

1) References

Commission Opinion [COM(97) 2010 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(98) 709 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(1999) 512 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2000) 712 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Commission Report [COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1208 final – Not published in the Official Journal]
Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236 of 23.09.2003]

2) Summary

In its July 1997 Opinion, the European Commission took the view that, in the area of social policy, Slovenia needed to pursue the major reforms it had already undertaken and to develop its social dialogue. It stated that Slovenia should be able to take on the obligations of EU membership in the medium term, provided that it maintains its efforts.

The November 1998 Report stated that insufficient effort had been made to bring Slovenian legislation into line with the Community acquis. Further effort was therefore required to meet the obligations in this area. There was also a need to strengthen the public employment services.

In its October 1999 and 2000 Reports, the Commission considered that the overall employment and social situation had improved because the pace of reforms had increased. However, it noted that in some areas progress was still not up to schedule.

In its 2003 Report the Commission said that Slovenia was essentially meeting the commitments and requirements arising from the accession negotiations in the areas of labour law, equal treatment of women and men, heath and safety at work, social dialogue, public health, employment policy, social inclusion and social protection. It was expected to be in a position to implement this acquis upon accession.
Nevertheless, particular attention still needed to be devoted to full implementation in relation to the European Social Fund and combating discrimination.
The Treaty of Accession was signed on 16 April 2003 and accession took place on 1 May 2004.

COMMUNITY ACQUIS

In the social affairs field, apart from the various specific action programmes, such as those in the area of public health, and the European Social Fund, EU legislation covers health and safety at work, labour law and working conditions, equal opportunities for men and women, coordination of social security schemes for migrant workers, and tobacco products.

In all these areas, the EU’s social legislation lays down minimum requirements, accompanied by safeguard clauses for the most advanced Member States.

In addition, the consultation of the social partners and the social dialogue at European level are enshrined in Articles 138 and 139 of the Treaty (ex-Articles 118a and 118b).

EVALUATION

According to the 2003 Report, Slovenia’s legislation is largely in line with the acquis on labour law, except for the working time of seafarers and civil aviation workers. Some fine-tuning of the legislation regarding collective redundancies is still needed. Slovenia has adopted legislation intended to complete alignment with the acquis on young people. The new acquis supplementing the European Company Statute is expected to be transposed after accession.

In October 1998 a new version of the Law on Employment and Unemployment Insurance was adopted. It aims to enable Slovenia to pursue an “active” employment policy, to promote re-integration into the labour market and to discourage black market labour. A national employment programme for 2000 and 2001 was adopted at the end of 1999.

The 2003 report also notes that efforts are still required on employment policy to effectively implement the priorities identified in the Joint Assessment of Employment Priorities (JAP). In particular, it is important to take measures to assist those excluded from the labour market and to continue reform of the education and training systems, in particular concerning life-long learning. Enhanced efforts are needed to address informal and undeclared work and to promote active ageing.

The unemployment rate has been falling since 1998, from 7.4% that year to 7.2% in 1999, 6.6% in 2000 and 6% in 2002.

The 2000 report found that tripartite social dialogue was working well, but some progress was still needed with bipartite social dialogue. On the eve of accession the 2003 report recorded that the administrative framework was in place and social dialogue was well advanced, especially at tripartite level. However, autonomous bipartite social dialogue and free collective bargaining between social partners’ organisations with voluntary affiliation still needed to be promoted at both sectoral and enterprise level.

In June 1999 a new law on health and safety at work was adopted. Since then, eight implementing decrees transposing EU provisions have been adopted. Slovenia has been participating in the Community Programmes on health promotion, the fight against cancer, combating drugs and AIDS prevention since May 2000.

In the 2003 report the Commission notes that Slovenia has aligned its legislation with a substantial part of the acquis. It has obtained transitional periods regarding the Directives on the protection of workers from the risks related to exposure to noise, chemical, and biological agents at work.

In the field of public health, Slovenia has completed alignment with the acquis. It should continue strengthening administrative capacity during 2004 to implement EU requirements regarding the surveillance and control of communicable diseases. Since 2001 good progress has been made in improving the health status of the population and in the field of health expenditure.

As regards equal treatment for men and women, in 2000 Slovenia still had to adopt the new Law on Parental and Family benefits and ensure equal treatment in occupational social security schemes.

The 2003 report notes that Slovenia has transposed all legislation in the field of equal treatment of women and men and the legislative transposition is in line with the acquis. A specific implementing structure has been created within the Office for Equal Opportunities to hear cases of alleged unequal treatment and issue opinions.

In the field of combating discrimination, legislative alignment is advanced but remains to be completed as regards the Equality Body, which has not yet been established.

In the course of 2004 the Commission and Slovenia must finalise the Joint Memorandum on Social Inclusion, which identifies key challenges and possible policy orientations for promoting social inclusion. On this basis, a national integrated strategy and a National Action Plan on social inclusion will have to be developed.

In the field of social protection, sustained efforts are required to implement the reforms that have been introduced to further help improve the level and efficiency of social protection.

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.