Tag Archives: Sheep

Bluetongue

Bluetongue

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Bluetongue

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal health

Bluetongue

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 2000/75/EC of 20 November 2000 laying down specific provisions for the control and eradication of bluetongue [See amending act(s)].

Summary

This Directive lays down measures to control and eradicate bluetongue.

Suspected or confirmed cases of the bluetongue virus must be notified to the competent authority of the Member State concerned before implementing the required measures.

Measures for suspected cases of the disease

Where the presence of the disease is suspected in a flock, the official veterinarian is to place the holding(s) concerned under surveillance and undertake a certain number of investigative measures (surveillance of the holding, inventory of the animals and the premises, epidemiological survey, etc.) and protective measures (ban on movements of animals, treatment of animals with insecticide, destruction and disposal of animal carcases, etc.).

Measures for confirmed cases of the disease

If the presence of the disease is confirmed, the official veterinarian will extend the measures introduced on suspicion to all holdings within a 20-km radius around the infected holding(s). He will also carry out an epidemiological survey and may launch a vaccination programme around the outbreaks of bluetongue.

Where the presence of the disease is confirmed, the competent authority must establish a protection zone and a surveillance zone around the holdings.

Protection zone and surveillance zone

The protection zone will extend over a radius of at least 100 kilometres around the infected holding(s). Within that zone, all holdings with animals must be identified and the animals may not leave the zone. The competent authority must establish an epidemiological surveillance programme. A vaccination programme may also be set up within the protection zone.

The surveillance zone will extend for at least 50 kilometres beyond the protection zone. Within that zone, the measures for identification, restriction of movement and epidemiological surveillance applicable within the protection zone must be implemented. However, the vaccination of animals against bluetongue is forbidden.

The protection and surveillance zones may be extended or reduced depending on the epidemiological, geographical, ecological or meteorological circumstances.

Derogations and supplementary measures

The Commission, assisted by the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health may adopt supplementary or derogatory measures. In particular provisions may be adopted to allow animals to leave the protection and surveillance zones under certain conditions.

National laboratories

Each Member State designates a national laboratory responsible for carrying out the laboratory tests provided for by this Directive and then informs the other Member States and the public of the laboratory’s contact details. Each national laboratory must cooperate with the Community reference laboratory located at Pirbright (United Kingdom).

Context

The outbreak of bluetongue at the end of the 1990s demonstrated that the Community legislation then in force did not deal with the specific features of the disease. This Directive takes over a number of measures laid down by Directive 92/35/EEC concerning African horse sickness, which were adaptable to cover bluetongue.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2000/75/EC

22.12.2000

1.1.2002

OJ L 327 of 22.12.2000

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2008/73/EC

12.12.2006

OJ L 219 of 14.8.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 2000/75/EC have been incorporated in the original text. This consolidated versionis of documentary value only.

Common organisation of sheepmeat and goatmeat markets

Common organisation of sheepmeat and goatmeat markets

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Common organisation of sheepmeat and goatmeat markets

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Markets for agricultural products

Common organisation of sheepmeat and goatmeat markets

The common organisation of the market in sheepmeat and goatmeat is designed to stabilise prices and guarantee a fair level of income for farmers, while establishing a system of prices and arrangements for trade with third countries. These specific provisions remain in force until 30 June 2008.

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 2529/2001 of 19 December 2001 on the common organisation of the market in sheepmeat and goatmeat [see amending Acts].

Summary

As from 1 July 2008, products falling under the scope of this Regulation will be covered by the common organisation of agricultural markets.

Scope

The products affected are lambs, live sheep and goats, fresh, chilled and frozen meat from sheep or goats, edible offal, fats and other prepared or preserved meat and offal from sheep or goats.

Private storage aid

When there is a particularly difficult market situation in Great Britain, Northern Ireland or any other Member State taken separately, the European Commission may decide to grant private storage aid within the framework of a tendering procedure. In urgent cases, aid amounts may be fixed in advance without tendering.

Trade with third countries

Imports and exports may be subject to presentation of an import or export licence issued by Member States to any applicant.

The rates of duty in the Common Customs Tariff apply to products in the sheepmeat and goatmeat sectors.

Additional import duties may be imposed if there is a risk that imports might destabilise the Community market.

Tariff quotas are administered by applying one of the following methods: first come, first served; simultaneous examination; or traditional/new arrival. Other non-discriminatory methods may be applied.

The use of inward processing arrangements may be prohibited to the extent necessary for the proper working of the common organisation of the market or if there is a risk of the Community market being disturbed.

When trading with third countries, it is forbidden to impose charges having equivalent effect to customs duties or to apply any quantitative import restrictions or measures having the same effect.

Protective measures may be taken if the Community market is threatened with disturbance by reason of imports or exports.

Other provisions

Member States monitor prices on the market. When there is a substantial rise or fall in prices and this threatens to disturb the market, the necessary measures may be taken.

Exceptional measures may be taken to support a market affected by restrictions on free movement resulting from animal diseases.

Save as otherwise provided in this Regulation, the Treaty rules on State aid apply to the sheepmeat and goatmeat sector.

The Member States and the Commission notify one another of the information needed in order to implement the Regulation.

In implementing the Regulation, the Commission is assisted by a Management Committee for Sheepmeat and Goatmeat, comprising representatives of the Member States and chaired by a representative of the Commission.

At the end of 2005, the Commission reported to the European Parliament and the Council on the environmental consequences of sheep and goat farming.

If necessary, transitional measures may be taken to ensure the smooth changeover to the new common organisation of the market.

Background

This common organisation of the market in sheepmeat and goatmeat brought together all the various pieces of legislation governing that market up until 2001. It regulated trade in these products both on the internal market and with third countries. It did so by providing aid to Community producers in the form of direct payments.

This scheme was replaced by the 2003 agricultural reform which introduced the single farm payment, while still providing ewe and goat premiums.

In 2007, the common organisation of the market in sheepmeat and goatmeat was subsumed under the single common organisation of the market, which replaced the 21 individual systems in place for various sectors and simplified the legislative framework for the common agriculture policy.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 2529/2001 22.12.2001 OJ L 341, 22.12.2001
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Acts on the accession to the EU of the Czech Republic and the Republics of Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia 1.5.2004 OJ L 236, 23.9.2003
Regulation (EC) No 1782/2003 1.1.2004 OJ L 270, 21.10.2003
Regulation (EC) No 1913/2005 2.12.2005 OJ L 307, 25.11.2005

Successive amendments and corrections to Regulation (EC) No 2529/2001 have been incorporated into the basic text. This consolidated version (pdf ) is for reference purposes only.

Related Acts

Definitions

Regulation (EEC) No 461/93 [Official Journal L 49, 27.2.1993].

Community scale for the classification of sheep carcasses.
See consolidated version (pdf ).

Premium scheme

Regulation (EC) No 2550/2001 [Official Journal L 341, 22.12.2001].
Detailed rules for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 2529/2001 on the common organisation of the market in sheepmeat and goatmeat as regards premium schemes and amending Regulation (EC) No 2419/2001.

Intervention/private storage

Regulation (EC) No 6/2008 [Official Journal L 3, 5.1.2008].
Detailed rules for the granting of private storage aid for sheepmeat and goatmeat.

Regulation (EEC) No 3447/90 [Official Journal L 333, 30.11.1990].

Special conditions for the granting of private storage aid for sheepmeat and goatmeat.
See consolidated version (pdf ).

Imports

Regulation (EC) No 874/96 [Official Journal L 118, 15.5.1996].

Imports of pure-bred breeding animals of the ovine and caprine species from third countries.

Monitoring of the markets

Regulation (EC) No 315/2002 [Official Journal L 50, 21.2.2002].

Survey of prices of fresh or chilled lamb on representative markets in the Community.

Transitional measures

Regulation (EC) No 264/2002 [Official Journal L 43, 14.2.2002].

Transitional measures for the application of premium schemes in the sheepmeat and goatmeat sectors.