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Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area: Towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system

Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area: Towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area: Towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system

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Transport > Bodies and objectives

Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area: Towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system

Document or Iniciative

Commission White Paper of 28 March 2011: “Roadmap to a Single European Transport Area – Towards a competitive and resource efficient transport system” [COM (2011) 144 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

In this White Paper, the Commission sets out to remove major barriers and bottlenecks in many key areas across the fields of transport infrastructure and investment, innovation and the internal market. The aim is to create a Single European Transport Area with more competition and a fully integrated transport network which links the different modes and allows for a profound shift in transport patterns for passengers and freight. To this purpose, the roadmap puts forward 40 concrete initiatives for the next decade, explained in detail in the Commission Staff Working Document accompanying the White Paper.

The White Paper shows how we can achieve the transformation of our transport system, keeping our objective to reduce CO2 emissions by 60 % by 2050 through:

  • developing and deploying new and sustainable fuels and propulsion systems;
  • optimising the performance of multimodal logistic chains, including by making greater use of more energy-efficient modes;
  • increasing the efficiency of transport and of infrastructure use with information systems (including SESAR and Galileo) and market-based incentives (such as the application of “user pays” and “polluter pays” principles).

It also sets ten goals to guide policy and measure our progress inter alia on:

  • phasing out conventionally fuelled cars and trucks from cities by 2050;
  • shifting 30 % of medium and long distance road freight to other modes by 2030;
  • using cars for less than half of middle distance travel by 2050; or
  • halving road traffic deaths by 2020 and achieving near-zero casualties in road transport by 2050.

In order to implement the above goals, a genuine single European transport area needs to be established by eliminating all existing barriers between modes and national systems, easing the process of integration and facilitating the emergence of multinational and multimodal operators. A single European transport area would facilitate the movement of EU citizens and freight, reduce costs and improve the sustainability of EU transport. A transformation of the current European transport system will only be possible through a combination of initiatives at all levels and covering all transport modes.

In air transport, the initiatives include the completion of the Single European Sky, the deployment of the future European air traffic management system (SESAR), as well as revising the Slot Regulation to make more efficient use of airport capacity. In rail transport, the initiatives include the development of a Single European Railway Area, opening the domestic rail passengers market to competition, and establishing an integrated approach to freight corridor management. In maritime transport, the European Maritime Transport Space without Barriers should be further developed into a “Blue Belt” of free maritime movement both in and around Europe, with waterborne transport being used to its full potential. In road transport, the initiatives include the review of the market situation of road freight transport as well as the degree of convergence on road user charges, social and safety legislation, transposition and enforcement of legislation in EU countries.

The Commission also proposes initiatives concerning e-Freight, the EU approach to jobs and working conditions across transport modes, security of cargo and land transport. Proposed initiatives also aim to improve the safety in all transport modes, including civil aviation safety and the transport of dangerous goods.

Innovation is also paramount to this strategy and the EU recognises the need to promote the development and use of new technologies. The Commission therefore proposes a regulatory framework for innovative transport, including:

  • appropriate standards for CO2 emissions of vehicles in all transport modes;
  • vehicle standards for noise emission levels;
  • public procurement strategies to ensure rapid up take of new technologies;
  • rules on the interoperability of charging infrastructure for clean vehicles;
  • guidelines and standards for refuelling infrastructures.

One of the White Paper’s top priorities is to complete the trans-European transport network: TEN-T. This is essential for creating employment and economic growth because the network aims to provide a seamless chain linking all modes of transport – air, rail, road and sea.

Finally, to promote sustainable behaviour in EU transport, the White Paper puts forward the following initiatives:

  • promote awareness of alternative means of transport (walking, cycling, car sharing, park & ride, intelligent ticketing);
  • review and develop vehicle labelling for CO2 emissions and fuel efficiency;
  • encourage carbon footprint calculators, allowing better choices and easier marketing of cleaner transport solutions;
  • include eco-driving requirements in the future revisions of the driving licence directive;
  • consider reducing maximum speed limits of light commercial road vehicles, to decrease energy consumption and enhance road safety.

Roadmaps for Bulgaria and Romania

Roadmaps for Bulgaria and Romania

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Roadmaps for Bulgaria and Romania

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007

Roadmaps for Bulgaria and Romania

1) Objective

To draw up roadmaps setting out the main steps to be taken by Bulgaria and Romania to ensure that they are ready for accession.

2) Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 13 November 2002 – Roadmaps for Bulgaria and Romania [COM(2002)624 – Not published in the Official Journal].

3) Summary

In its 2002 strategy paper for enlargement, the Commission indicated that roadmaps would be adopted for Bulgaria and Romania. They were in fact adopted at the Copenhagen European Council held on 12 and 13 December 2002. The communication contains these roadmaps, aimed at helping Romania and Bulgaria to meet the necessary criteria before accession (the European Council supports the efforts of both countries to join the Union in 2007). To achieve this goal, the roadmaps set out the tasks to be completed by these countries and provide additional financial assistance.

Among the tasks to be carried out, the roadmaps concentrate, in particular, on the administrative and judicial capacities required in the countries to enable them to implement the acquis and on economic reform.

The Commission proposes a substantial increase in the financial assistance for Bulgaria and Romania from the first wave of accessions (which should take place in May 2004). It proposes that the assistance should be increased gradually until 2006, when it should total 40% more than the average assistance granted to both countries from 2001 to 2003. All additional assistance will be conditional on making progress in line with the roadmaps and each country’s capacity to use the funds effectively. The instruments used will continue to be the same, in other words Phare, ISPA and SAPARD. Additional aid will be used to help Bulgaria and Romania prepare for participation in the Structural Funds.

The roadmaps cover the period up to the accession of Bulgaria and Romania and will be updated periodically in view of progress in the negotiations and developments in the countries.

The Commission will continue to monitor the progress and implementation of the commitments made at Bulgaria’s and Romania’s accession negotiations, in particular through the regular reports published each year. The next regular reports will contain an assessment of the implementation of the roadmaps.

Roadmap for Bulgaria

The roadmap for Bulgaria concentrates on administrative and judicial capacities, economic reform and the chapters of the acquis. The current situation in these three areas is described and steps to be taken are indicated. As regards administrative capacity, a reform strategy should be drawn up. As regards judicial capacity, the Commission expresses its support for the implementation of a strategy and action plan for the reform of the judicial system. As far as economic reform is concerned, priority should be given to the following aspects: the privatisation programme, development of small and medium-sized businesses, the programme to reduce and simplify licensing procedures, reform of the customs and tax administrations, bankruptcy procedures, development of financial intermediation, enforcement of property rights, transactions and prices of agricultural land, and public investment in education, the environment, health and infrastructure. Finally, for each of the chapters of the acquis, the necessary measures are indicated.

Roadmap for Romania

The roadmap for Romania also concentrates on administrative and judicial capacities, economic reform and the chapters of the acquis. The current situation in these three areas is described and steps to be taken are indicated. Key areas for the reform of the public administration and the reform of the judiciary are highlighted. The Commission will support these reforms through the Phare programme. Priority areas for the economic reform are set out: rate of inflation, inter-enterprise arrears, wage bill in the public sector, energy costs, tax reform, budgetary reform, bankruptcy procedures, development of financial intermediation, enforcement of property rights, transactions and prices of agricultural land, public enterprise reform, completion of privatisation in the banking sector, public investment in infrastructure, education, the environment and health, and reduction of State aid. Finally, for each of the chapters of the acquis, the necessary measures are indicated.

4) Implementing Measures

5) Follow-Up Work

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Romania – adoption of the community acquis

Romania – adoption of the community acquis

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Romania – adoption of the community acquis

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Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Romania – adoption of the community acquis

Romania – adoption of the community acquis

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Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

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Transport > Road transport

Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

The purpose of this directive is to require undertakings involved in the carriage of dangerous goods to designate one or more safety advisers to be responsible for helping to prevent the type of risk inherent in this kind of transport operation.

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 96/35/EC of 3 June 1996 on the appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods by road, rail and inland waterway [Official Journal L 145 of 19.06.1996].

Summary

Aim: To require Member States to ensure that undertakings the activities of which include the transport, or the related loading or unloading, of dangerous goods by road, rail or inland waterway each appoint one or more safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods, responsible for helping to prevent the risks inherent in such activities with regard to persons, property and the environment.

Definition of terms: (undertakings, safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods, etc.).

Exemptions: The Directive does not apply to:

  • the carriage of goods under the authority of the armed forces;
  • activities concerning quantities within the limits defined in the Directive;
  • undertakings which only occasionally engage in the national transport of dangerous goods posing little danger or risk of pollution.

Role and appointment of adviser: The adviser has to seek all appropriate means and promote all appropriate action to ensure that dangerous goods are transported in the safest possible way.

Training certificate: the adviser must hold a vocational training certificate covering at least the subjects listed in Annex II to the Directive, the aim being to ensure that the candidate is sufficiently aware of the risks inherent in the transport of dangerous goods, knows the laws in question and has sufficient knowledge of the duties of the adviser defined in Annex I.

Validity of the certificate: five years, may be extended where, during the final year before its expiry, its holder has followed refresher courses or passed an examination both of which must be approved by the competent authority.

Accident report: In the event of an accident affecting persons, property or the environment, the adviser is required to draw up a report.

Adaptation of the Directive: The Directive sets up an advisory committee to assist the Commission by giving its opinion on the legislation in question.

Directive 96/35/EC will be repealed by Directive 2008/68/EC tr0006 as from 30 June 2009.

References

Act Date
of entry into force
Final date for implementation in the Member States
Directive 96/35/EC 09.07.1996 31.12.1999

Related Acts

Directive2000/18/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2000 on minimum examination requirements for safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods by road, rail or inland waterway [Official Journal L 118 of 19.5.2000]

Directive 96/35/EC lays down that undertakings whose activities include the transport of dangerous goods must appoint one or more safety advisers. However, that directive does not contain any detailed provisions aimed at the harmonisation of examination requirements for safety advisers or any provisions applicable to examination bodies. For this reason, Directive 2000/18/EC establishes a common minimum framework for the examination of safety advisers and the conditions for the examination bodies in order to guarantee a certain level of quality and to facilitate the mutual recognition of EC certificates of training for safety advisers.
The national authorities organise a compulsory written examination which may be supplemented by an oral examination to check whether candidates possess the necessary level of knowledge required to carry out the tasks of adviser in order to obtain the EC certificate. This examination covers general prevention and safety measures, the classification of dangerous goods, general packaging requirements, danger markings and labels etc.
If Member States do not take direct charge of the organisation of the examination, they must appoint the examination bodies on the basis of various criteria such as: competence of the examination body, independence of the body etc.
Directive 2000/18/EC entered into force on 19.5.2000. It will be repealed by Directive 2008/68/EC as from 30 June 2008.

Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

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Transport > Road transport

Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Document or Iniciative

Council Decision 93/704/EEC of 30 November 1993 on the setting-up of a Community database on road traffic accidents [See amending acts].

Summary

Requirement that Member States record statistics on bodily damage caused by road traffic accidents taking place on their territory (collision between users involving at least one vehicle and causing deaths or injuries).

Requirement that the Member States pass on those data each year to the Statistical Office of the European Communities (Eurostat).

Requirement that the Commission ensures that the data received are disseminated and that the base functions properly (conditions attached to access to statistics, any publications, etc.) in cooperation with the Committee for the statistical programme.

Three years after implementation of this decision, the Commission will send the Council an assessment report on the results obtained and on the resultant pointers for the continuation of the activities.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 93/704/EC 22.12.1993 OJ L 329 of 30.12.1993
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 20.11.2003 OJ L 284 of 31.10.2003

Related Acts

Commission report of 26 May 1997 on the progress made with the Community’s “CARE” database on bodily damage caused by road traffic accidents and on the future course to be followed by that data base [COM(97) 238 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

In implementing Article 6 of Decision 93/704/EC this report reviews the first three years of the practical application of the CARE project. Overall that review is positive: the system quickly became operational, the data are available and their confidentiality ensured. In future it will be possible to make improvements, more particularly as regards the homogenisation of accident data. New information would have to be provided in order to round off the comparative international analyses, while the cooperation between the Member States, which plays an essential part in data management and quality, and in the development of a policy concerning CARE access and application, would have to be boosted.

Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

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Transport > Road transport

Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

This Communication aims to improve road safety with a view to reducing the number of accidents in the European Union.

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions: Promoting road safety in the European Union: – the programme for 1997-2001 [COM (97) 131 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Communication takes stock of road safety matters in the European Union for the years 1993-1996:

  • almost all legislative measures announced in the action programme presented in 1993 have been undertaken;
  • all planned studies have been carried out; these focused mainly on vehicles (passive safety), telematic applications and behaviour analysis;
  • non-legislative measures such as the Year of the Young Driver 1995 and the YES campaigns were implemented;
  • the CARE project was initiated, facilitating the creation of a detailed database on road accidents involving personal injury in the different Member States.

The trends and characteristics of road safety in the European Union are as follows:

  • figures vary widely from one country to another;
  • an explosion in the number of cars in certain Member States has gone hand in hand with a worsening of the situation in those countries;
  • the number of fatal accidents is decreasing;
  • those most at risk are pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, young adults and the elderly;
  • alcohol is still a significant factor in accidents, despite the undoubted success of alcohol-related programmes in some countries;

The Commission advocates a cost-benefit approach in the formulation of future road safety policy.

The record shows that road accidents are estimated to cost 45 billion euros per year, consisting of 15 billion for medical care, police involvement and vehicle repairs, and 30 billion in lost economic production due to fatalities or injuries. With 45 000 vicitims annually, the avoidance of a fatal accident would save 1 million euros. There is therefore an economic justification for taking measures costing up to one million euros rder to save a single life (“the million euros rule”).

Using this approach, the Commission identifies several courses of action involving:

  • the wearing of seat belts;
  • vehicle design (reduction of the risk to pedestrians, improvements to passive safety):
  • the use of collision warning and cruise control systems;
  • day running lights;
  • speed;
  • blood alcohol level while driving;
  • the effect of drugs or medicines on driving;
  • infrastructures.

The aim of this new policy is to reduce the annual total of victims to 18 000 in 2010 (as against 27 000 if the current policy is maintained).

The primary role of the Commission is:

  • to monitor the overall progress of road safety in the Union;
  • to collect, interpret and disseminate information relating to all aspects of road safety;
  • to ensure that the most efficient practices are promoted throughout the whole of Europe;
  • to collect information on offences giving rise to serious accidents in the Union;
  • to support research.

The main elements of the programme for 1997-2001 are the following:

  • a Commission Recommendation which acknowledges the high financial cost of road accidents by applying cost-benefit methods of evaluation to road safety measures;
  • an integrated information system for the European Union which would consolidate information on accident statistics and data on the implementation of road safety measures, research etc.
  • measures aimed at combating driving while in a state of fatigue or under the influence of alcohol, medicines or drugs;
  • the application of technology and telematics in order to increase driving safety;
  • the co-ordination and promotion of a safety classification system so as to give consumers scientifically accurate information on vehicle safety features.

Related Acts

Council resolution of 26 June 2000 on the improvement of road safety [Official Journal C 218 of 31.7.2000].

The Council welcomes the publication of the Progress Report (see point 8 below), which forms part of the second Community action programme for the promotion of road safety in the European Union for the period 1997 – 2001. The Council finds that progress needs to be made in three areas:

  1. In terms of legislation, the Council proposes to extend the compulsory use of seatbelts, to extend the scope of the legislation on speed limitation devices to include vehicles weighing over 3.5 tonnes, to introduce legislation requiring motorbike and moped users to wear helmets, and to act in relation to a maximum blood-alcohol level for drivers;
  2. In terms of research, the Council wishes to pursue efforts under the existing research programmes (evaluation of new car models, influence of drugs and medicinal products on drivers, telematic systems, safety systems, etc.) and to initiate other research (secondary effects of air bags, effects of making it compulsory to wear a helmet, etc.);The Council wishes to promote information campaigns and exchange of information on road safety.

Priorities in EU road safety: Progress Report and Ranking of Actions. Communication from the Commission of 17 March 2000 [COM (2000) 125 Not published in the Official Journal].
The Communication takes up suggestions from the Council and the European Parliament to issue a progress report on the Action Programme. It gives a ranking to future measures at Community level and makes a recommendation to decision-makers at all levels to give more weight to the fact that the cost of preventing accidents is generally much lower than the economic cost of the casualties and damage they cause.
The Commission considers the current Action Programme (1997 – 2001) a success. Much has been achieved in the strategic fields of improving enforcement of traffic rules and regulations, raising public awareness of road safety, and the gathering and dissemination of information on safety issues.
A multi-criteria analysis followed by a cost-effectiveness assessment of the actions listed in the 1997-2001 Programme has led to the definition of the following short and medium-term priorities in road safety in the EU:

  • Continue to work with and develop the European New Car Assessment Programme, (EuroNCAP);
  • Campaigns and legislation on seat belts and child restraints;
  • Recommendation to the Member States on maximum blood alcohol levels in traffic;
  • Legislation on speed limiters for light commercial vehicles;
  • Develop guidelines for ‘Black Spot’ management (places with a concentration of accidents) and the design of ‘forgiving’ roadsides (i.e. less likely to cause injury in the event of an accident);
  • Legislation on safer car fronts for pedestrians and cyclists.

Beyond these key priorities the Communication lists a further five measures for which more research into cost-effectiveness is desirable: medical standards for driving licences; standards for driving tests; daytime running lights; effects of medicines on driver behaviour; post-accident care.
Three supporting measures also receive a high priority: the CARE accident statistics data base; an integrated information system; research into vehicle standards and telematics.
Finally, the Communication contains a Recommendation from the Commission encouraging the governments and local and regional authorities of the Member States to establish the practice of calculating the costs and effects of road safety measures, to increase investments in these measures and to develop mechanisms that will enable the benefits of road safety measures to be felt more directly by those taking the decisions and bearing the costs of their implementation.

Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

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Transport > Road transport

Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Last updated: 04.09.2007

Road safety: transportable pressure equipment

Road safety: transportable pressure equipment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: transportable pressure equipment

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: transportable pressure equipment

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2010/35/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 June 2010 on transportable pressure equipment and repealing Council Directives 76/767/EEC, 84/525/EEC, 84/526/EEC, 84/527/EEC and 1999/36/EC.

Summary

This directive updates certain technical provisions of Directive 1999/36/EC to avoid conflicting rules. It sets out detailed rules on transportable pressure equipment *to improve safety and to ensure free movement of such equipment within the European Union (EU).

This directive applies to:

  • new transportable pressure equipment which does not bear the conformity markings provided for in Directives 84/525/EEC, 84/526/EEC, 84/527/EEC or 1999/36/EC, for the purpose of making it available on the market;
  • transportable pressure equipment bearing the conformity markings provided for in the above directives, for the purposes of its periodic inspections, intermediate inspections, exceptional checks and use;
  • transportable pressure equipment which does not bear the conformity markings provided for in Directive 1999/36/EC, for the purposes of reassessment of conformity.

This directive does not apply to:

  • transportable pressure equipment placed on the market before the implementation date of Directive 1999/36/EC and which has not been subject to a reassessment of conformity;
  • transportable pressure equipment exclusively used for the transport of dangerous goods between EU and non-EU countries, undertaken in accordance with Directive 2008/68/EC.

Obligations of economic operators *

Manufacturers must ensure that when placing their transportable pressure equipment on the market, the equipment has been designed, manufactured and documented in compliance with the requirements in both this directive and in Directive 2008/68/EC. When this compliance is demonstrated through the conformity assessment process, manufacturers must affix the Pi marking * to the equipment. This Pi marking must only be affixed by the manufacturer or, in cases of reassessment of conformity, by or under the surveillance of the notified body.

If manufacturers believe that they have placed on the market transportable pressure equipment that does not conform to the requirements, they must immediately take the necessary corrective measures to fulfil the requirements and, where appropriate, withdraw or recall the equipment from the market. If requested by the competent national authority, manufacturers must provide all documents to prove the conformity of their equipment, in a language easily understood by the authority.

Manufacturers may, by a written mandate, appoint an authorised representative. The mandate will specify tasks for the authorised representative to undertake, but will include:

  • keep the technical documentation at the disposal of national surveillance authorities;
  • provide the competent national authority, on request, with all necessary information and documentation to prove the conformity of the transportable pressure equipment;
  • cooperate with the competent national authorities on action taken to eliminate any risks posed by the equipment covered by the mandate.

Importers and distributors may only place on the EU market transportable pressure equipment that complies with Directive 2008/68/EC and this directive. They must ensure that the equipment bears the Pi marking and has the necessary certificate of conformity. Where importers or distributors do not believe the equipment to be in conformity, they must not place it on the market.

Importers, distributors and owners must:

  • inform the manufacturer and competent authority of any risk presented by the equipment. Alternatively, where relevant, the distributor can inform the importer and the owner can inform either the distributor or the importer of such a risk;
  • document all instances of non-compliance and corrective measures;
  • ensure that when transportable pressure equipment is under their responsibility, storage or transport conditions do not jeopardise its conformity.

The above does not apply to private individuals intending to use the equipment for their personal use, leisure or sporting activities.

Conformity of transportable pressure equipment

The transportable pressure equipment must meet the relevant conformity assessment, periodic inspection, intermediate inspection and exceptional checks requirements, as well as the specifications of the documentation according to which the equipment was manufactured;

Free movement of transportable pressure equipment

No EU country may prohibit, restrict or impede the free movement, the placing on the market and the use of transportable pressure equipment on their territory, when the above complies with this directive.

Key terms used in the act
  • Transportable pressure equipment:
    • all pressure receptacles, their valves and other accessories when appropriate;
    • tanks, battery vehicles / wagons, multiple-element gas containers (MEGCs), their valves and other accessories when appropriate;
    • includes gas cartridges but excludes aerosols, open cryogenic receptacles, gas cylinders for breathing apparatus and fire extinguishers;
  • economic operator: the manufacturer, the authorised representative, the importer, the distributor, the owner or the operator acting in the course of a commercial or public service activity, whether in return for payment or free of charge;
  • Pi marking: marking which indicates that the transportable pressure equipment is in conformity with the applicable conformity assessment requirements set out in Directive 2008/68/EC and in this directive.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2010/35/EU

20.7.2010

30.6.2011

OJ L 165 of 30.6.2010

Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

rd road safety action programme, the Commission has published policy orientations on road safety to provide a general framework, under which concrete action can be taken at European, national, regional or local levels from 2011 until 2020.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Communication of 20 July 2010 to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – “Towards a European road safety area: policy orientations on road safety 2011-2020” [COM(2010) 389 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Although progress was made on road safety in the European Union (EU) during the 3rd European road safety action programme (2003-10), the Commission highlights that efforts to improve road safety need to be further strengthened. This 3rd road safety action programme (RSAP) included an ambitious target to halve the number of road deaths by 2010 as well as numerous proposals for concrete actions in vehicle safety, safety of infrastructure and users’ safety. Although the Commission accepts that the initial target was not likely to be met by the end of 2010, the RSAP has encouraged EU countries to be more proactive in improving road safety and has gone a long way to dramatically reduce the number of fatalities on EU roads.

The European road safety policy orientations 2011-20 aims to provide a general framework and challenging objectives to guide national and local strategies, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity. Within the general framework, the Commission highlights the need to:

  • create a cooperation framework based on the exchange of best practices across the EU;
  • adopt a strategy for injuries and first aid to address the need to reduce the number of road injuries;
  • improve the safety of vulnerable road users.

Principles and target

The Commission sets out three main principles:

  • striving for the highest road safety standards throughout Europe – by encouraging EU citizens to take primary responsibility for their own safety and the safety of others on EU roads, and by focusing on improving the safety of more vulnerable road users;
  • an integrated approach to road safety – through cooperation with other EU policy areas, such as energy, environment, education, innovation and technology, and justice.
  • subsidiarity, proportionality and shared responsibility – through the concept of shared responsibility, commitment and concrete actions at all levels from EU countries and their authorities to regional and local bodies.

Following the RSAP 2003-10, the Commission proposes to maintain the target of halving the overall number of road deaths in the EU between 2010 and 2020. This ambitious target demonstrates the EU’s clear commitment towards road safety and having a common objective is intended to provide EU citizens with a more uniform level of road safety within the EU. The Commission encourages individual EU countries to contribute to the achievement of this common target through their own national road safety strategies.

During the public consultation for these policy orientations, which took place between July and December 2009, a target for reducing road traffic severe injuries was proposed. Once a common definition exists for ‘severe injuries’, the Commission will propose to add a common “injuries reduction target” to these European road safety policy orientations up to 2020.

Strategic objectives

The Commission has identified seven objectives, for which actions will be proposed at both EU and national level:

  • improve education and training of road users – the quality of the licensing and training system needs to be improved, with emphasis on young drivers. The Commission will work with EU countries to develop a common educational and training road safety strategy including pre-test learning, the driving licence test, and post-licence training;
  • increase enforcement of road rules – the Commission, the European Parliament and the Council will work together to establish a cross-border exchange of information in the area of road safety. The Commission will also work towards a common road safety enforcement strategy which will involve enforcement campaigns, national enforcement objectives, and vehicle technology to assist enforcement, including the possibility of speed limiters in light commercial vehicles and alcohol interlock devices;
  • safer road infrastructure – the Commission will ensure that European funds will only be granted to infrastructure that complies with the EU safety requirements. The Commission will also promote the application of the relevant principles of safe management to the secondary road network of EU countries, in particular through the exchange of best practices.
  • safer vehicles – as well as continue to encourage the progress of vehicle safety, the Commission will also evaluate and propose actions in the area of harmonisation and progressive strengthening of EU legislation on roadworthiness tests and on technical roadside inspections;
  • promote the use of modern technology to increase road safety – the Commission will continue to promote the use of Intelligent Transport Systems to improve road traffic safety. The effectiveness and speed of rescue will be enhanced by the adoption of the European emergency call service fitted to vehicles, ‘eCall’;
  • improve emergency and post-injuries services – the Commission will propose the establishment of a global strategy of action on road injuries and first aid. The Commission will in particular examine the means to improve the efficiency of first aid intervention and post-care handling in order to reduce the impact of road accidents.
  • protect vulnerable road users – the Commission will work to improve the safety of motorcyclists, addressing behaviour, as well as vehicle and infrastructure safety. It will also encourage the establishment of adequate infrastructures to increase the safety of cycling and other vulnerable road users.

Implementation of the European road safety policy orientations 2011-20

A framework for open cooperation between EU countries and the Commission will be established to facilitate the implementation of the EU road safety policy. Parallel to this, EU countries should also develop national road safety plans including specific national objectives which are individual to their particular situation.

The Commission will pursue the improvement of the existing tools for data collection and analysis, such as CARE, the EU database on road accidents established in accordance with Council Decision 93/704/EC, as well as the European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO), which makes publicly available through the Internet road safety data and knowledge at European level.

Road transport

Road transport

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road transport

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road transport

Road transport is the principal means of transport in the European Union for both passengers and goods. Today, the European Union has almost one vehicle for every two residents, and road freight traffic represents more than two thirds of the total tonnage. European Union action focuses essentially on controlling the multiple costs of road transport. Transport development must comply with safety requirements as well as environmental protection. In addition, a number of aspects of transport are the subject of European regulation, whether this is competition between transport operators, access to the profession, working conditions or the technical standards of vehicles.

CARRIAGE OF GOODS

  • Common rules for access to the international road haulage market
  • Goods: towards a safer and more competitive high-quality road transport system
  • Goods: carriage between Member States
  • Goods: community safeguard mechanism
  • Goods: Non-resident carriers in the national market
  • Taxation of heavy goods vehicles: Eurovignette Directive
  • Goods: distribution of permits for heavy goods vehicles travelling in Switzerland
  • Goods: statistical returns on the carriage of goods by road
  • Hiring of vehicles for the carriage of goods

CARRIAGE OF PASSENGERS

  • Common rules for access to the international market for coach and bus services
  • Rights of passengers in bus and coach transport
  • Interbus Agreement: the international occasional carriage of passengers by coach and bus
  • Passenger car related taxes

EMPLOYMENT AND WORKING CONDITIONS

  • Road transport operators: conditions for the pursuit of the occupation
  • Driving time in the road transport sector
  • Organisation of working time in respect of road transport activities
  • Passengers and goods: Driver attestation

ROAD SAFETY

  • Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20
  • Road safety: Road Safety Action Programme (2003-2010)
  • Road safety: cross-border application of the legislation
  • Inland transport of dangerous goods
  • Checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road
  • European system for registration of carriers of radioactive materials (Proposal)
  • Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers
  • Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents
  • Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union
  • Road safety: Driving licences
  • Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys
  • Drinking and driving: Maximum authorised level of alcohol in the blood
  • Motor vehicles and their trailers: roadworthiness test
  • Motor vehicles and their trailers: roadworthiness testing of heavy goods vehicles
  • Road safety: transportable pressure equipment
  • Minimum levels of safety in European road tunnels