Tag Archives: PO

Possibilities for cooperation with Hong Kong and Macao

Possibilities for cooperation with Hong Kong and Macao

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Possibilities for cooperation with Hong Kong and Macao

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Relations with third countries > Asia

Possibilities for cooperation with Hong Kong and Macao (2007-2013)

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 25 October 2006 entitled “The European Union, Hong Kong and Macao: possibilities for cooperation 2007-2013” [COM(2006) 648 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Cooperation between the European Union (EU) and the Hong Kong and Macao Special Administrative Regions (SARs) is based principally on economic, trade and financial actions.

Since the handover of Hong Kong and Macao to China, these two SARs have been governed by the “one country, two systems” principle. In effect, their governments possess a high degree of autonomy in trade, fiscal, financial and regulatory matters, as well as their own legal and market economy systems. They are also members of international bodies such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the World Customs Organization (WCO).

Greater cooperation

The region of Hong Kong is a major maritime and air transportation hub in Asia. It is a major trading partner of the EU; thousands of European companies and citizens are established there. European diplomatic presence is represented there by a permanent office and a European chamber of commerce, in addition to the diplomatic and trade missions of Member States.

Cooperation between Hong Kong and the EU is based on a set of agreements on:

  • trade, under the framework of WTO multilateral commitments;
  • customs cooperation, specifically with the aim of combating fraud and piracy;
  • readmission of persons residing without authorization.

However, cooperation must also progress in the areas of competition rules and intellectual property rights.

The EU is Macao’s third largest trading partner. The close links it retains with Portuguese culture also contribute to the strength of its cooperation relations with the EU.

The partners concluded a trade cooperation agreement in 1992, which acted as a framework for funding projects in different areas (training, tourism, European studies, services, law, etc.), as well as a readmission agreement for persons in 2002.

New areas for cooperation

The partners identify a set of priorities aimed at expanding their cooperation. The EU must also endeavour to participate in the actions of trilateral cooperation undertaken by Hong Kong, Macao and mainland China.

In the areas of trade and customs, there is a need to:

  • improve the exchange of information and coordination on bilateral and multilateral trade;
  • strengthen the protection of intellectual property rights, combat smuggling and make shipping more secure;
  • develop exchanges of best practice on competition policy and public procurement;
  • support businesses, and inform them of the possibilities to access markets, specifically to the benefit of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs);
  • encourage university exchanges, in particular concerning training on business management.

The partners also need to give new impetus to their financial cooperation by developing dialogue and through regulatory convergence (investment funds, company law, etc.). In addition, the cooperation should contribute towards compliance with the principles of good fiscal governance in order to promote the business environment, growth and jobs.

Cooperation must also make progress with regard to immigration and university exchanges.

As regards transport, maritime security and regulation must be the subject of enhanced cooperation. Similarly, the partners share common interests on matters relating to legal certainty for air carriers and civil aviation.

Action must also be taken to improve the protection of health, food and product safety, and in particular to promote the implementation of rapid alert systems for foodstuffs and compliance with EU safety standards.

Effort must be made to promote environmental protection, particularly through combating air and water pollution, and reducing industrial emissions.

Related Acts

Joint Report to the European Parliament and the Council: Annual Report Hong Kong 2010 [COM(2011) 204 Final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Joint Report to the European Parliament and the Council: Annual Report Macao 2010 [COM(2011) 205 Final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Pollutants from large combustion plants

Pollutants from large combustion plants

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Pollutants from large combustion plants

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Air pollution

Pollutants from large combustion plants

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2001/80/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2001 on the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants into the air from large combustion plants [See amending acts].

Summary

This Directive applies to combustion plants (technical apparatus in which fuels are oxidised in order to use the heat thus generated) with a rated thermal input equal to or greater than 50 MW, irrespective of the type of fuel used (solid, liquid or gaseous).

Its purpose is to limit the amount of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and dust emitted from large combustion plants each year.

It encourages the combined production of heat and electricity (cogeneration).

Combustion plants authorised between 1 July 1983 and 27 November 2002 and brought into operation no later than 27 November 2003 must comply with the emission limit values laid down in Part A of Annexes III to VII for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and dust.

Plants authorised after 27 November 2002 must comply with the emission limit values laid down in Part B of Annexes III to VII for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and dust.

The Directive also requires significant cuts in emissions at “existing plants”, i.e. plants authorised before 1 July 1987. These cuts are to be achieved by 1 January 2008:

  • by achieving compliance, plant by plant, with the emission limits applicable to plants authorised between 1 July 1983 and 27 November 2002 (Part A of Annexes III to VII), or
  • through a national emission reduction plan applicable to the total emissions of the plants it covers.

Member States must send the Commission their national emission reduction plan for existing plants by no later than 27 November 2003. These plans must contain objectives, measures and timetables for attaining them, and a monitoring mechanism. The Commission must publish guidelines to help the Member States draw up their national plans.

The Directive allows existing plants to be exempted from compliance with the emission limits and from inclusion in the national emission reduction plan on condition that the operator undertakes not to operate the plant for more than 20 000 hours between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2015.

In addition, the Directive authorises derogations from compliance with the emission limit values for plants which burn specific types of fuel.

Member States must ensure that waste gases from combustion plants are discharged via stacks high enough to safeguard human health and the environment.

The methods for measuring emissions and the frequency of monitoring are set out in Annex VIII to the Directive. The same Annex contains the rules on establishing and keeping emission inventories for large combustion plants.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2001/80/EC 27.11.2001 27.11.2002 OJ L 309 of 27.11.2001
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Acts concerning the accession of the Czech Republic, Estonia, Cyprus, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia 1.5.2004 OJ L 236 of 23.9.2003
Directive 2006/105/EC 1.1.2007 1.1.2007 OJ L 363 of 20.12.2006

Related Acts

Proposal of 21 December 2007 for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on industrial emissions (integrated pollution prevention and control) (Recast) [COM(2007) 844 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Council Decision 2003/507/EC of 13 June 2003 on the accession of the European Community to the Protocol to the 1979 Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution to Abate Acidification, Eutrophication and Ground-Level Ozone [Official Journal L 179 of 17.7.2003].
This Protocol seeks to cut emissions of sulphur, NOx, NH3 and VOC caused by human activity and capable of damaging human health and the environment through processes of acidification, eutrophication and tropospheric ozone formation resulting from long-range transboundary transport.

Commission Recommendation 2003/47/EC of 15 January 2003 on the guidelines to assist a Member State in the preparation of a national emission reduction plan further to the provisions of Directive 2001/80/EC on the limitation of emissions of certain pollutants into the air from large combustion plants [Official Journal L 16 of 22.1.2003].

Poland – adoption of the community acquis

Poland – adoption of the community acquis

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – adoption of the community acquis

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Poland – adoption of the community acquis

Poland – adoption of the community acquis

src=”../../../images/icons/picto_18_heading.jpg” alt=”Enlargement” >

  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland
  • Poland

Police and customs cooperation

Police and customs cooperation

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Police and customs cooperation

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Justice freedom and security > Police and customs cooperation

Police and customs cooperation

The protection of citizens requires better mutual assistance and exchanges of information between the law enforcement agencies of Member States. In particular, it is imperative that cooperation between national police as well as customs authorities be stepped-up to effectively fight crime at both local and European levels.
Mutual assistance between police services is based on bodies such as Europol and the European Police College (Cepol). Customs cooperation is based on the Naples II Convention.
In addition, various instruments have been put in place to achieve police and customs cooperation targets. These include the specific programme “Prevention of and fight against crime”, the Customs 2013 programme and the modernised customs code.

POLICE COOPERATION

  • Standing Committee on operational cooperation on internal security
  • Cooperation between special intervention units
  • Stepping up cross-border cooperation (Prüm Decision)
  • Cooperation in criminal matters: protection of personal data
  • Simplifying the exchange of information between law enforcement authorities
  • Joint investigation teams
  • Sharing of information on terrorist kidnappings
  • A global approach to PNR data transfers
  • Information management in the area of freedom, security and justice
  • The external dimension of the area of freedom, security and justice
  • Exchange of information between the law enforcement authorities of the Member States
  • Enhancing police and customs cooperation in the European Union
  • Improved effectiveness, enhanced interoperability and synergies between European databases

Action programmes

  • Specific programme: Preventing and combating crime (2007-2013)
  • Framework programme concerning police and judicial cooperation in criminal matters (AGIS)
  • Robert Schuman project (1998-2000)

Europol

  • European Police Office – Europol (from 1.1.2010)
  • Access to the Visa Information System (VIS) by the national authorities and Europol
  • Protecting the euro against counterfeiting: the role of Europol
  • The European Police College (CEPOL)
  • Secretariat for the joint supervisory data-protection bodies
  • Democratic control over Europol
  • Transmission of personal data by Europol
  • Europol: European Police Office (until 31.12.2009)

Maintaining public order and safety

  • European network for the protection of public figures
  • Security in connection with football matches with an international dimension
  • Exchange of information on movements of groups
  • Prevention and control of hooliganism

CUSTOMS COOPERATION

  • Customs 2013 (2008-2013)
  • Action programme: Customs 2007 (2003-2007)
  • Money laundering: prevention through customs cooperation
  • International convention on the simplification and harmonisation of customs procedures
  • Convention on mutual assistance and cooperation between customs administrations (Naples II)
  • Strategy for the evolution of the Customs Union
  • The role of customs in the integrated management of external borders
  • Strategy for the Customs Union

Agreements with non-EU countries

  • Customs Agreement with Japan
  • Agreement with China
  • Agreement with India
  • Agreement with Hong Kong
  • Agreement with Canada
  • Agreement with the Republic of Korea

Poland – Economic Reform

Poland – Economic Reform

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – Economic Reform

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Poland

Poland – Economic Reform

Short-term priorities:

  • To establish medium-term economic policy priorities and to make a joint assessment within the framework of the Europe Agreement;
  • To adopt measures to deal with the external deficit;
  • To accelerate the privatisation of State enterprises;
  • To contribute to the sound development of the financial sector.

Assessment (October 1999)

Poland implemented its short-term priorities measures in part.

A medium-term economic strategy was developed. Privatisation and restructuring of some State enterprises was carried out, but further efforts were needed for restructuring enterprises in the coming years. The financial sector was strengthened by framework legislation and progress was made on privatising banks. In the telecommunications sector, legislation on interconnection was adopted. A start was made on privatising TPSA (telecommunications), but no progress was made in setting up a regulatory authority. No improvement was recorded in respect of bankruptcy procedures.

Assessment (November 2000)

The restructuring of the steel industry continued. Little progress was noted on restructuring and privatising the main steelworks. Some notable privatisation successes were recorded in other sectors. No improvements were noted in the functioning of the land register or bankruptcy procedures. Economic stability had largely been achieved.

Assessment (November 2001)

Economic stability has been achieved. Efforts are continuing to restructure the steel industry and on privatisation. Improvements have been made in the functioning of the land register and bankruptcy procedures.

Assessment (October 2002)

Progress with privatisation is less marked. Certain steps have been taken to facilitate the restructuring of the steel and railway industries and, to a lesser extent, of the coal industry.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • To complete privatisation;
  • To strengthen the institutions necessary for the operation of the market economy.

Assessment (October 1999)

Poland completed its first joint assessment and developed a macro-economic strategy in order to balance its books. Significant progress was made in bringing Polish legislation on the central bank into line with Community requirements. The new legal framework strengthened the independence of the central bank, but further efforts were needed to prepare for its accession to the European system.

Assessment (November 2000)

Competitiveness had improved as regards the policy on small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and export promotion.

Assessment (November 2001)

As regards competitiveness, progress has been noted in SME policy and the promotion of exports, and improvements have been made to their legal and commercial framework. The reform of the steel and coal industries and social security has continued, as have efforts to consolidate the property market. A budget monitoring procedure still needs to be put in place.

Assessment (October 2002)

Considerable efforts have been made to maintain macroeconomic and budgetary stability, while progress has been achieved in implementing an institutional framework for the market economy. In general, the priorities set for the accession partnership as regards economic criteria have, to a large extent, been achieved.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Council Decision 98/260/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2002 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 701 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 509 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 709 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1752
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1408
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1207
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Poland – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Poland – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Poland

Poland – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Short-term priorities:

  • improvements in customs, state aid monitoring, justice and home affairs (ministries and departments), financial control, veterinary and phytosanitary controls (particularly as regards infrastructures at external borders), the environment, taxation and regional policy.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been implemented only in part.

Poland has made little progress in strengthening its institutional and administrative capacities. In terms of regional policy, the new decentralised administrative body set up in January 1999 is an important step forward. However, more sustained attention needs to be devoted to improving the operation of customs, in particular by applying a uniform system for the processing of declarations. In all the other sectors, such as state aid, financial control, fisheries, the Ministries responsible for justice and home affairs, veterinary and phytosanitary controls, the environment and taxation, limited progress has been made in defining administrative and regulatory responsibilities and in setting up bodies to apply the rules.

Assessment (November 2000)

Legislation on external financial control is almost complete, but work on internal financial control must continue. Additional legislation is needed to achieve this.

Assessment (November 2001)

The rural development plan has been adopted, although the national development plan has not progressed. The framework legislation on external financial control is almost finished, but the legislation on internal control has yet to be finalised. Efforts are necessary with regard to application for the timetables of the programmes cofinanced by the European Union.

Assessment (October 2002)

These priorities have not been assessed. The section on the Partnership for accession in the 2002 report focuses on issues which require more work in order to prepare Poland for accession.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • setting up a unit to fight fraud and a National Audit Office;
  • strengthening financial control capacities;
  • improving the functioning of the judicial system;
  • strengthening justice and home affairs institutions (with an adequate number of suitably trained staff);
  • strengthening parliamentary procedures for adopting laws;
  • improving the capacity to collect taxes;
  • strengthening the relevant food control administration.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress has been made towards achieving these medium-term priorities.

Assessment (November 2000)

A fast-track procedure for adopting Community legislation has been developed. Progress has been made in strengthening institutions, but greater efforts are needed.

Assessment (November 2001)

Poland has developed a fast-track procedure for adopting Community legislation. Efforts have been made to strengthen capacities in the field of statistics and training on Community law. The legislation on internal financial control is in place. The anti-fraud unit must be strengthened further, as should the financial control of the public administration.

Assessment (October 2002)

These priorities have not been assessed.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Council Decision 98/260/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2002 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 701 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 509 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 709 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001)700 final – SEC(2001) 1752
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002)700 final – SEC(2002) 1408
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1207
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Poland – internal market

Poland – internal market

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – internal market

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Poland

Poland – internal market

Short-term priorities:

  • mainly in the field of certification and standardisation (continued alignment of regulatory measures and conclusion of a European Conformity Assessment Agreement);
  • continued alignment of intellectual and industrial property law and public contracts;
  • strengthening the regulatory authority and completing the inventory of state aids;
  • liberalisation of capital movements;
  • adoption of a law on state aids.

Assessment (October 1999)

Progress in this area has been very limited.

In the field of standards and certification, there have been considerable delays with the adoption of the New Approach and institutional bodies. As regards state aids, the necessary legislative framework has not been created, nor has an independent surveillance body been set up. There has not been any progress in the field of intellectual and industrial property. In the public contracts sector, the national preference clause is still in force. Poland has not yet adopted the legislation required under its Europe Agreement concerning the liberalisation of capital movements.

Assessment (November 2001)

European businesses are still encountering difficulties in gaining access to the Polish market. There has been good progress with legislation on intellectual and industrial property. Progress on the free movement of capital has been limited, but better on competition. A regulatory authority has been set up for telecommunications.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • alignment of legislation on public contracts;
  • alignment of legislation on conformity assessment for financial products and services;
  • further improvements in the field of competition, the audio-visual sector, land ownership and external border controls;
  • strengthening standardisation and conformity assessment bodies;
  • establishment of a market surveillance system;
  • alignment of horizontal technical regulations governing industrial products;
  • strengthening the powers of the authorities responsible for state aids and concentrations;
  • promoting the development of enterprises, especially SMEs;
  • alignment of the telecommunications sector, consumer protection and the internal energy market with the acquis communautaire.

Assessment (October 1999)

A new law on public contracts has been adopted and is due to come into force in 2000, but further legislative amendments will be required. A Bill on standardisation and certification is currently being considered by Parliament. There has been some progress with antitrust legislation, and the Government plans further measures to harmonise Polish competition law with the acquis. Legislation on state aids is currently being adopted, but there has not yet been any progress with aligning regulations on state monopolies. Polish legislation on the energy market continues to be brought into line with the acquis.

Assessment (November 2001)

Legislation has been adopted on public contracts. There are still obstacles to the free movement of capital. Work

has been done towards setting up regulatory and control bodies in the services sector, and the regulatory body for telecommunications is now operational. Progress has been made with mutual recognition of diplomas. The application of standards relating to State aids needs to be improved. Administrative capacity for customs and consumer protection needs to be further enhanced.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Council Decision 98/260/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Opinion of the Commission COM(97) 2002 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(98) 701 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(1999) 509 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1752
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1207
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Poland – Justice and Home Affairs

Poland – Justice and Home Affairs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – Justice and Home Affairs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Poland

Poland – Justice and Home Affairs

Short-term priorities:

  • To develop more effective border management and control systems, in particular of the borders of Belarus and Ukraine;
  • Visa regimes.

Assessment (October 1999)

Implementation of priority measures in this area advanced very little.

Poland made progress by adopting the law on aliens, but further efforts were needed to adjust its legislation on visas and immigration. It was also required to increase technical and financial resources to strengthen the administrative aspect of border management. Control of the Eastern border still presented major problems with regard both to staff and to installation and equipment.

Assessment (November 2000)

A national border management strategy was adopted. Coordination between law enforcement services improved. There was little progress in upgrading institutional capacity to fight organised crime and drug trafficking or in implementing an anti-corruption and anti-fraud programme.

Assessment (November 2001)

Poland has adopted an interinstitutional border management strategy. Progress has been made in combating organised crime and drug trafficking. With regard to efforts to combat fraud and corruption, Poland has ratified all the relevant conventions. However, further efforts are necessary.

Assessment (October 2002)

Efforts are being made to modernise equipment at the border inspection posts. Progress has also been made at the green and blue border, and in particular at the future external border of the European Union. However, these efforts are not sufficient. More progress is needed in the field of the allocation of budgetary resources and adequate administrative provisions. The decision to complete the alignment with the common visa policy will enter

into force in July 2003.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • to implement a new asylum system and to fight organised crime and corruption;
  • to implement a reform of the legislation on aliens, notably in view of the Schengen acquis.

Assessment (October 1999)

The adoption of the law on aliens was undoubtedly a very important step towards to achievement of a legislative framework relating to procedures. However, the various services responsible for the fight against crime (police, border guards, immigration and customs) had to be coordinated. Specific measures were adopted, in particular relating to the introduction of the witness protection scheme, which was consistent with the practice in force in the European Union. These measures were beginning to bear fruit.

Assessment (November 2000)

Some progress was made with regard to the administrative capacity of the judiciary. Border controls improved, but efforts needed to be intensified along the future borders of the Union.

Assessment (November 2001)

Progress has been made in boosting the administrative capacity of the judiciary and in border controls. Rapid progress has been made in bringing Polish law into line with EU asylum and immigration law. The struggle against organised crime and police cooperation with Europol must continue to be priorities for Poland. Overall, the Commission is satisfied with the progress made.

Assessment (October 2002)

Measures have been taken to adopt and implement a strategy to combat organised crime.
Measures have been taken to improve internal cooperation within the police and with other bodies. However, other measures are necessary to increase the capacity to combat organised crime.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Council Decision 98/260/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2002 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 701 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 509 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 709 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1752
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1408
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1207
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Poland – Agriculture

Poland – Agriculture

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – Agriculture

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Poland

Poland – Agriculture

Short-term priorities:

Agriculture

  • definition of a coherent rural development and structural policy;
  • adoption of implementing regulations;
  • introduction and application of veterinary and plant health rules, especially as regards inspection and control with a view to protecting the European Union’s external borders;
  • upgrading of certain food-processing plants (milk and meat sectors) and certain testing and diagnostic facilities.

Assessment (October 1999)

Very few aspects of the short-term priorities for agriculture have been implemented.

Progress has been made on reorganising the veterinary and plant health services. In July 1999 the Polish Government adopted a text on agricultural structural policy which is a first step towards a rural development policy. The Polish authorities must ensure, however, that this policy adequately meets the requirements for accession. Limited progress has been made in upgrading certain food-processing plants and diagnostic facilities.

Assessment (November 2000)

The rural development plan has been adopted but its implementation is still not far advanced. The obstacles to imports have been increased. Competitiveness must be improved. Little progress has been made on the priorities relating to control arrangements and the improvement of diagnostic and testing facilities. Veterinary and plant health legislation has not been aligned with the Community’s.

Assessment (November 2001)

The rural development plan is still being introduced. Efforts have been made as regards removing tariff barriers, inspection, testing and diagnostic facilities and the alignment of veterinary and plant health legislation. Special attention must be paid to non-tariff barriers and competitiveness.

Assessment (October 2002)

Poland must strengthen its border controls and modernise its facilities.

Fisheries

  • accelerated preparation of a fisheries policy and restructuring plan;
  • drafting of an integrated development programme with a view to providing appropriate institutional structures and sufficient resources and facilities for the inspections;
  • introduction of a fleet register.

Assessment (November 2000)

The process of drafting a fisheries policy and restructuring plan has been speeded up. Little progress has been made on providing the administrative structures, resources or facilities needed for the inspections, or on introducing a fleet register.

Assessment (November 2001)

Preparation of a coherent fisheries policy and a restructuring programme has been completed. However, little progress has been made on introducing the facilities necessary for inspection and control at central and regional level or on creating a fleet register.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

Agriculture

  • adoption of the Community acquis (notably in the veterinary and plant health fields and as regards external border controls in particular);
  • implementation of the structural and rural development policy;
  • development of capacity to implement and apply the common agricultural policy (CAP), notably in terms of administrative structures and the basic management mechanisms for supervising the agricultural markets and for implementing the structural and rural development measures;
  • adoption and implementation of veterinary and plant health rules;
  • upgrading of certain food-processing plants and testing and diagnostic facilities;
  • restructuring of the agri-food industry.

Assessment (October 1999)

Little progress has been noted in the agricultural area, notably regarding the adoption of the acquis in the veterinary and plant health fields.

Assessment (November 2000)

Improvements have been noted as regards the milk and meat processing plants.

Assessment (November 2001)

A start has been made on implementing the rural development plan. Major efforts are needed as regards administrative structures, the upgrading of certain food-processing plants and the introduction of veterinary and phytosanitary control posts at the borders. No progress has been recorded as regards livestock identification, quality control, waste treatment and programmes to control waste and zoonoses. The national laboratory project has not advanced.

Assessment (October 2002)

Alignment with the acquis has not been completed and administrative capacities have not been adjusted. Efforts must continue, particularly in the veterinary area. The integrated administration and control system must be set up.

Fisheries

  • development of capacity to implement and monitor the common fisheries policy.

Assessment (October 1999)

In the case of fisheries, a programme to establish a fisheries policy and to restructure the industry is slowly taking shape. The administrative resources devoted to management and inspection are practically non-existent.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress on these priorities has been noted.

Assessment (November 2001)

Minimal progress has been made on the priorities as regards legislation, institutional means or resources.

Assessment (October 2002)

Progress has been made on alignment with the acquis and strengthening administrative capacity. Efforts must continue.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Council Decision 98/260/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2002 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 701 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 509 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 709 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1752
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1408
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1207
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Poland – Environment

Poland – Environment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Poland – Environment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Poland

Poland – Environment

Short-term priorities

  • continue the transposition of framework legislation,
  • draw up detailed approximation programmes and implementation strategies for individual acts,
  • plan and launch these programmes and strategies.

Assessment (October 1999)

Very limited progress has been made in these areas. No detailed strategy for approximating or implementing legislation has yet been established. Little additional legislation has been transposed.

Assessment (November 2000)

There has been no transposition or implementation of specific directives. No progress has been noted with implementation of the acquis. There has been limited progress in developing a financial investment plan, and progress has been made with regard to the Environmental Impact Assessment Directive. Very little progress has been made in strengthening the environmental administration.

Assessment (November 2001)

Progress has been made with transposition and implementation of specific directives, notably on water and waste. By contrast, there has been little progress on implementation of the acquis and on strengthening the administrative capacity. Progress has been made with developing a financial investment plan. The Environmental

Impact Assessment Directive has been transposed.

Assessment (October 2002)

Some progress has been made with transposing the acquis, though further efforts are required with regard to air quality, water quality, chemicals, waste management and industrial pollution.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • set up capacity and structures for monitoring and implementation,
  • continue the planning and implementation of approximation programmes for individual acts,
  • pay particular attention to drinking water quality, waste water and waste and to large combustion plants.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress has been noted with the medium-term priorities in this area.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been noted with these priorities.

Assessment (November 2001)

Significant progress has been made in the areas of chemicals and genetically modified organisms. Further legislation is required in the areas of noise and waste. Further efforts are required to improve both water and air quality monitoring. More needs to be achieved with regard to the integration of sustainable development into other sectoral policies.

Assessment (October 2002)

There has been a strengthening of administrative, monitoring and enforcement capacity at national level, though considerable further efforts are required at regional and local level. More needs to be done with respect to licensing, monitoring and planning. Higher priority needs to be given to integrating environmental protection requirements into the formulation and implementation of all other sectoral policies.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Council Decision 98/260/EC of 30.3.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.4.1998

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2002 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 701 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 509 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 709 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1752
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1408
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1207
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.