Tag Archives: Packaging

Good manufacturing practice for materials and articles intended to come into contact with food

Good manufacturing practice for materials and articles intended to come into contact with food

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Good manufacturing practice for materials and articles intended to come into contact with food

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Contamination and environmental factors

Good manufacturing practice for materials and articles intended to come into contact with food

Document or Iniciative

Commission Regulation (EC) No 2023/2006 of 22 December 2006 on good manufacturing practice for materials and articles intended to come into contact with food.

Summary

This Regulation establishes “good manufacturing practice *” for materials and articles intended to come into contact with food.

“Good practice” harmonises manufacturing procedures in the European Union for the aforementioned materials at all stages of production, from manufacture to distribution.

Manufacturers must establish a quality assurance system and a quality control system (see below) following the detailed manufacturing regulations, for example the processes involving printing inks.

Materials in contact with food include objects such as containers and packaging, but also all materials in contact with foodstuffs, such as paper and cardboard or those which could possibly transfer their constituents to food, for example inks and adhesives.

Annex 1 to Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004 includes a list of the materials covered by this Regulation: active and intelligent objects, adhesives, ceramics, cork, rubbers, glass, ion-exchange resins, metals and alloys, paper and cardboard, plastics, printing inks, regenerated cellulose, silicones, textiles, varnishes and coatings, waxes and wood.

Quality assurance system and quality control system

This Regulation includes an obligation for manufacturers to implement a quality assurance system (taking account of the personnel required to put the system in place and the size of the business), as well as a quality control system. The latter provides for measures to be taken should a business fail to comply with good manufacturing practice.

In addition, manufacturers shall create and maintain documentation regarding the specifications, manufacturing formulae and product processing which are important for the compliance and safety of the finished article, as well as those related to the various manufacturing operations. They are required to make the documentation available to the competent authorities at their request.

Key terms of the Act
  • ‘good manufacturing practice (GMP)’ means those aspects of quality assurance which ensure that materials and articles are consistently produced and controlled to ensure conformity with the rules applicable to them and with the quality standards appropriate to their intended use by not endangering human health or causing an unacceptable change in the composition of the food or causing a deterioration in the organoleptic characteristics thereof.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 2023/2006

18.1.2007

OJ L 384 of 29.12.2006

AMENDMENTS TO THE ANNEXES

Annex – Detailed rules on good manufacturing practice
Regulation (EC) No 282/2008 [Official Journal L 86 of 28.3.2008].

Materials and articles which come into contact with foodstuffs

Materials and articles which come into contact with foodstuffs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Materials and articles which come into contact with foodstuffs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Contamination and environmental factors

Materials and articles which come into contact with foodstuffs

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 October 2004 on materials and articles intended to come into contact with food and repealing Directives 80/590/EEC and 89/109/EEC [See amending acts].

Summary

This Regulation aims at guaranteeing a high level of protection of human health and the interests of consumers with regard to the placing on the Community market of materials and articles intended to come into contact with food either directly or indirectly.

Scope

This Regulation covers all materials and articles that are intended to come into contact with food: all types of packaging, bottles (plastic and glass), cutlery, and even adhesives and inks for printing labels.

The Regulation also introduces specific provisions concerning “active”
* and “intelligent”
*
packaging which extends the shelf-life of food or which reacts when food has gone off (packaging which changes colour, for example).

The Regulation does not cover:

  • materials and articles which are supplied as antiques;
  • covering or coating materials, such as materials which cover cheese rinds, prepared meat products or fruit;
  • fixed water supply equipment.

Requirements for materials and articles

Materials and articles which come into contact with food shall be produced in line with good manufacturing practice. They must under no circumstances transfer substances to the food with which they are in contact in quantities likely to:

  • endanger human health;
  • bring about an unacceptable change in the composition of the food; or
  • bring about a deterioration in the organoleptic characteristics thereof.

If “active” materials and articles change the composition or organoleptic characteristics of food, they must comply with Directive 89/107/EEC on additives and/or any national rules.

The labelling, advertising and presentation of a material or article shall not mislead consumers under any circumstances.

Specific measures for groups of materials and articles

Annex I of this Regulation identifies 17 groups of materials and articles for which specific measures may be adopted:

  • intelligent materials and articles;
  • adhesives;
  • ceramics;
  • cork;
  • rubbers;
  • glass;
  • ion-exchange resins;
  • metals and alloys;
  • paper and cardboard;
  • plastic materials;
  • printing inks;
  • regenerated cellulose;
  • silicones;
  • textiles;
  • varnishing and coatings;
  • waxes;
  • wood.

These specific measures may include:

  • the list of substances authorised for use in the manufacture of materials and articles that are intended to come into contact with food;
  • criteria of purity;
  • specific conditions of use;
  • limits on the migration of certain constituents into or on to food;
  • provisions aimed at protecting human health or ensuring compliance with requirements for materials and articles that are intended to come into contact with food;
  • basic rules for checking compliance with the provisions above;
  • rules concerning the collection of samples;
  • provisions for ensuring traceability;
  • additional provisions of labelling for active and intelligent materials and articles;
  • provisions concerning the establishment of a Community Register of authorised substances, processes, materials or articles;
  • specific procedural rules for the authorisation of a substance, process, material or article.

In the absence of specific measures, Member States may maintain or adopt national provisions.

Authorisation of substances

Applications for authorisation of a new substance for the manufacture of materials or articles intended to come into contact with food shall be made to the competent authority of the Member State where the substance is to be placed on the market. Applications shall then be sent to the European Food Safety Authority which is responsible for evaluating the toxicity of substances in order to avoid any risk to consumers.

Traceability

This Regulation also establishes the requirements to be met regarding the traceability of food contact materials from production to sale.

The labelling or documentation accompanying materials and articles placed on the market in the Community should guarantee the traceability of the said materials and articles. This facilitates control, the recall of defective products, consumer information and the attribution of responsibility.

Labelling

The nature of materials and articles intended to come into contact with food is to be described on their labelling. Materials and articles which are not clearly intended to contain or to package food must bear the words “For food contact” or the symbol given in Annex II (the symbol represents a glass and a fork).

Context

Earlier legislation on materials in contact with foodstuffs protected the health of consumers by ensuring that no material or article in contact with foodstuffs could bring about chemical reactions which would change the composition or organoleptic properties of these foodstuffs (taste, appearance, texture or even smell).

This Regulation repeals this legislation in order to allow the introduction of “active” and “intelligent” packaging. It also repeals Directive 80/590/EEC determining the symbol that may accompany materials and articles intended to come into contact with foodstuffs and incorporates the symbol in Annex II (see the above explanation on labelling).

Key terms of the Act
  • Materials and articles intended to come into contact with food: materials and articles that are intended to extend the shelf-life or to maintain or improve the condition of packaged food. They are designed to deliberately incorporate components that would release or absorb substances into or from the packaged food or the environment surrounding the food.
  • Intelligent materials and articles intended to come into contact with food: materials and articles which monitor the condition of packaged food or the environment surrounding the food.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1935/2004

3.12.2004

OJ L 338 of 13.11.2004


Amending act(s)
Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 596/2009

7.8.2009

OJ L 188 of 18.7.2009

Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous preparations

Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous preparations

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous preparations

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Single Market for Goods > Chemical products

Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous preparations

Document or Iniciative

Directive 1999/45/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 31 May 1999 concerning the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the Member States relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous preparations [See amending acts].

Summary

Scope

This Directive applies to dangerous preparations which contain at least one dangerous substance within the meaning of Article 2 or which are considered dangerous within the meaning of Articles 5, 6 or 7. The term “preparation” covers mixtures or solutions composed of two or more substances.

This Directive provides specific provisions for preparations which are not considered dangerous (within the meaning of Articles 5, 6 or 7), but which may nevertheless present a specific hazard.

This Directive shall not apply to the following preparations in the finished state, intended for the final user:

  • medicinal products for human or veterinary use;
  • cosmetic products;
  • mixtures of substances in the form of waste covered by Directive 2006/12/EC on waste disposal);
  • foodstuffs;
  • animal feedingstuffs;
  • preparations containing radioactive substances;
  • medical devices which are invasive or used in direct physical contact with the human body;
  • the carriage of dangerous preparations by rail, road, inland waterway, sea or air;
  • ,preparations in transit which are under customs supervision, provided they do not undergo any treatment or processing.

Classification

The classification of dangerous preparations shall be based on the definitions of categories of danger laid down in Article 2 of the Directive. These categories take into account the degree and specific nature of the hazards involved. They include preparations considered dangerous due to:

  • physico-chemical properties (for example, explosive, oxidising, or flammable); and/or
  • the health hazards it presents (for example, toxic, carcinogenic or harmful); and/or
  • the environmental hazards it presents.

The general principles of classification and labelling of dangerous substances applies to the methods specified in Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 and the criteria laid down in Directive 67/548/EEC on the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances, save where alternative criteria in the Directive are applied.

Packaging

The main requirements relating to packaging are as follows:

  • it shall be so designed and constructed that its contents cannot escape;
  • the materials constituting the packaging and fastenings must not be susceptible to adverse attack by the contents, or liable to form dangerous compounds with the contents;
  • packaging and fastenings must be strong and solid throughout to ensure that they will not loosen and will safely meet the normal stresses and strains of handling;
  • the shape and/or graphic decoration of packaging shall not arouse the curiosity of children nor mislead consumers;
  • it shall be designed so that it cannot be confused with foodstuffs, animal feedingstuffs, medicinal products or cosmetics;
  • containers for preparations must be fitted with child-resistant fastenings and/or carrying a tactile warning of danger.

Labelling

Any package must be clearly and indelibly marked with certain specific information such as:

  • the trade name of the preparation;
  • the name and contact details of the person responsible for placing it on the market;
  • in general the chemical name of the substance or substances present in the preparation which have given rise to the classification of the preparation with regard to health hazards;
  • the danger symbols and indications of danger, the risk phrases and the safety advice. Specific provisions concerning the presentation, format and wording of this information are laid down in Annexes II and VI to the Directive 67/548/EEC.

Member States may require the labelling of a preparation to be produced in their official language(s).

Under certain very restricted conditions specified in Article 12 of the Directive, some dangerous preparations may be exempt from the general requirements on packaging and labelling. Henceforth, the labelling of these preparations may be optional or may differ from the requirements laid down if the quantities present are so low that they do not present any hazard to users.

Obligations and duties of the Member States

The Member States appoint a national authority who shall inform the Commission on the application of this Directive. Those responsible for placing dangerous preparations on the market must hold at the disposal of that authority all information relating to the classification of the preparation (safety data, etc.).

Member States are required to designate the bodies responsible for receiving information on the health effects of preparations. This information can be used only in response to requests of a medical nature.

Confidentiality

The person responsible for placing a dangerous preparation on the market may make a request for confidentiality. This request is addressed to the competent authority of the Member States in which the preparation is to be first placed on the market. This procedure prevents the disclosure of the chemical identity of a certain substance on the label and does not risk the confidential nature of intellectual property. When the authority has made its decision, it shall inform the person responsible for placing the preparation on the market.

Free movement clause

Member States may not prohibit, restrict or impede the placing on the market of dangerous preparations which satisfy the requirements of this Directive.

Safeguard clause

A Member State may provisionally prohibit the placing on the market of a dangerous preparation or subject it to special conditions in its territory, even if it complies with the provisions of this Directive.

The Member States shall inform the Commission and the other Member States immediately of the adoption of such a measure and the reasons for its decision. The Commission shall consult Member States as soon as possible before making its decision.

Procedure for adaptation to technical progress

The amendments required to adapt the nine annexes to technical progress are adopted by the Commission with the assistance of a regulatory committee made up of representatives of the Member States and chaired by a representative of the Commission.

Context

This Directive shall be repealed with effect on 1 June 2015 by Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on the classification, labelling and packaging of chemicals and their mixtures.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 1999/45/EC

30.7.1999

30.7.2002

O.J. L 200 of 30.7.1999

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003

20.11.2003

OJ L 284 of 31.10.2003

Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006

1.6.2007
Application:
1.6.2008
1.8.2008 (Art. 135)
1.6.2009 (Title VIII and Annex XVII)

OJ L 396 of 30.12.2006

Regulation (EC) No 1137/2008

11.12.2008

OJ L 311 of 21.11.2008

Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008

20.1.2009

OJ L 353 of 31.12.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 1999/45/EC have been incorporated in the original text. This consolidated version is of documentary value only.

Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances

Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Single Market for Goods > Chemical products

Classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 67/548/EEC of 27 June 1967 on the approximation of laws, regulations and administrative provisions relating to the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances [See amending acts].

Summary

This is the first harmonising Directive in the field of chemical products. Given the extent of that field, the Commission limited the scope of this first Directive to the harmonisation of the classification, packaging and labelling of dangerous substances.

The Directive does not affect provisions relating to:

  • medicinal products;
  • cosmetic products;
  • mixtures of substances in the form of waste;
  • food;
  • animal feed;
  • pesticides;
  • radioactive substances;
  • other substances or preparations for which notification or approval procedures exist;
  • the carriage of dangerous substances;
  • unrefined substances which are in transit and are subject to customs inspection.

Definition

Within the meaning of the Directive, the term “substances” means chemical elements and their compounds as they occur in the natural state or as produced by industry. “Preparation” refers to mixtures or solutions composed of two or more substances.

Classification

The classification of dangerous substances is based on categories clearly defined in the Directive according to the greatest degree of hazard and the specific nature of the risks. These categories include explosive substances, inflammable substances, toxic substances, harmful substances, etc.

The Annexes to the Directive contain, among other things, a list of dangerous substances (Annex I), their classification and the provisions for their labelling, the symbols relating to each substance, the standard phrases relating to the nature of the special risks of each substance as well as, if the case arises, any phrases giving advice on safety precautions for the substance.

Packaging

The packaging of substances must comply with the following provisions:

  • the packaging must prevent any loss of the contents, except where special safety devices are prescribed;
  • the materials constituting the packaging and fastenings must not be liable to attack by the contents or liable to form harmful or dangerous compounds with the contents;
  • packaging and fastenings must be resistant and solid.

Labelling

The labelling must indicate:

  • the name of the substance;
  • the origin of the substance (name and address of the manufacturer, distributor or importer);
  • danger symbols and indication of danger involved in the use of the substance;
  • a reference to the special risks arising from such dangers.

This information must be presented in accordance with the Annexes to the Directive (symbols, standard phrases, etc.). The same applies to any advice on safety precautions.

The labelling must, in addition, comply with provisions on the size of the labelling. In particular, the dimensions of the label must not be less than those of a standard A8 sheet (52 x 74 mm), and each symbol must cover at least one tenth of the surface area of the label.

Member States may require their national language or languages to be used in the labelling of dangerous substances.

Where the packaging is too small, the labelling may be affixed in some other manner.

Member States may allow dangerous substances which are not toxic or explosive to derogate from the general rules on labelling established in Articles 23 and 24 of this Directive. The labelling of these substances may therefore be optional or differ from the established rules if they are present in such small quantities that there is no danger to users,

In the context of the international and/or national transport of dangerous substances, the labelling must comply with the international and/or national rules. Member States may not hamper the free movement within the European Community of dangerous substances which comply with the Directive, unless they establish that the substance constitutes a hazard to health and/or the environment. In such a case, the Member State must inform the Commission, which must launch a consultation procedure to assess the hazards and take any other necessary action

Member States must inform the Commission of measures taken pursuant to the Directive.

Context

Annex I is removed by Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 on the classification, packaging and labelling of chemicals and their mixtures and replaced by Table 3.1 of Annex VI to this Regulation from 20 January 2009.

Annex II will be repealed on 1 June 2015.

Annex III will be repealed on 1 June 2015.

Annex IV will be repealed on 1 June 2015.

Annex V is replaced by Regulation (EC) No 440/2008 laying down test methods pursuant to Regulation

(EC) No 1907/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) with effect from 1 June 2008.

Annex VI will be repealed on 1 June 2015. However, the provisions on the labelling and packaging of substances in Annex VI will no longer apply with effect from 1 December 2010.

Annex VII A, VII B, VII C, VII D and Annex VIII are deleted by Directive 2006/121/EC with effect from 1 June 2008.

Annex IX will be repealed with effect from 1 June 2015.

This Directive will be repealed in its entirety on 1 June 2015.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 67/548/EEC

29.6.1967

1.1.1970

1.1.1975 (Ireland)

OJ P 196 of 16.8.1967

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 71/144/EEC

24.3.1971

OJ L 74 of 29.3.1971

Directive 73/146/EEC

24.5.1973

24.11.1973

OJ L 167 of 25.6.1973

Directive 75/409/EEC

27.6.1975

1.6.1976

OJ L 183 of 14.7.1975

Directive 79/831/EEC

19.7.1976

18.9.1981
 Specific measures for the articles in the market before this date
18.9.1983
 deadline for the remaining articles

OJ L 259 of 15.10.1979

Directive 92/32/EEC

22.5.1992

31.10.1993

OJ L 154 of 5.6.1992

Directive 96/56/EC

21.9.1996

1.6.1998

OJ L 236 of 18.9.1996

Directive 1999/33/EC

19.8.1999

30.7.2000

OJ L 199 of 30.7.1999

Regulation (EC) No 807/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122 of 16.5.2003

Directive 2006/121/EC

19.1.2007

1.6.2007

OJ L 396 of 30.12.2006

Regulation (EC) 1272/2008

20.1.2009

OJ L 353 of 30.12.2008

Classification, packaging and labeling of chemicals and their mixtures

Classification, packaging and labeling of chemicals and their mixtures

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Classification, packaging and labeling of chemicals and their mixtures

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Single Market for Goods > Chemical products

Classification, packaging and labeling of chemicals and their mixtures

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 December 2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures, amending and repealing Directives 67/548/EEC and 1999/45/EC and amending Regulation (EC) No 1907/2006 [See amending act(s)].

Summary

This Regulation harmonises requirements concerning the classification, labelling and packaging of chemical substances and mixtures in line with the international system approved by the United Nations. This harmonisation enhances protection of health and the environment, and improves the free circulation of chemical substances and mixtures.

Enterprises must classify, label and pack their substances and mixtures in line with the provisions of this Regulation before putting them on the market.

Scope

The Regulation covers chemical substances and mixtures which are composed of two chemical substances or more.

The Regulation does not apply to:

  • radioactive substances and mixtures covered by Directive 96/29/Euratom;
  • substances subject to customs supervision which are in temporary storage, in a free zone or free warehouse with a view to re-exportation or still in transit;
  • non-isolated intermediates (substances which are manufactured in order to be chemically transformed into another substance);
  • substances and mixtures for scientific research and development which are not placed on the market;
  • waste;
  • medicinal products;
  • cosmetic products;
  • some medical devices;
  • food;
  • the transport of dangerous goods.

Classification

The classification of chemical substances and mixtures is based on categories which take into account the degree of hazard and the specific nature of the hazardous properties. These include inflammable substances or mixtures, those which are highly toxic, those which are dangerous for the aquatic environment, etc. Annex I establishes the criteria for the classification and labelling of hazardous substances and mixtures.

The Annexes of the Regulation also include the list of hazard statements, the list of precautionary statements, pictograms for each hazard class and the lists of classifications and labelling harmonised at Community level.

Labelling

Labelling must mention:

  • the name of the substance or mixture and/or an identification number;
  • the name, address and telephone number of the supplier;
  • the nominal quantity of the substance or mixture.

If applicable, labelling must include:

  • hazard pictograms (see Annex V of the Regulation);
  • the signal words “Danger” or “Warning”;
  • hazard statements such as “Fire or projection hazard”, “Fatal if swallowed”, etc. (see Annex III of the Regulation);
  • precautionary statements such as “Keep only in original container”, “Protect from moisture”, “Keep out of reach of children”, etc. (see Annex IV of the Regulation);
  • supplemental information, for example on physical properties or health hazards (see Annex II of the Regulation).

Hazard pictograms shall be in the shape of a square set at a point. They shall have a black symbol on a white background with a red frame sufficiently wide to be clearly visible. Each hazard pictogram shall cover at least one fifteenth of the surface area of the harmonised label and the minimum area shall not be less than 1 cm2.

The dimensions of the label shall be as follows:

Capacity of the package Dimensions (in millimetres)
Not exceeding 3 litres If possible, at least 52 × 74
Greater than 3 litres but not exceeding 50 litres At least 74 × 105
Greater than 50 litres but not exceeding 500 litres At least 105 × 148
Greater than 500 litres At least 148 × 210

The label for the hazardous substance or mixture shall be written in the official language(s) of the Member State where it is placed on the market, unless the Member State concerned provides otherwise.

Hazard pictograms, signal words, hazard statements and precautionary statements shall be located together on the label in an order established by the supplier, provided that the statements are grouped by language.

Packaging

Packaging containing hazardous substances or mixtures shall comply with the following requirements:

  • packaging must prevent any of the contents escaping;
  • packaging must be made of materials which are resistant if they come into contact with the contents;
  • packaging must be strong and solid;
  • packaging must have sealable fastenings.

In some cases, child-resistant fastenings and tactile warnings are required.

Harmonisation procedure

In order to trigger the harmonisation procedure for the classification and labelling of substances, Member States, or even manufacturers, importers or downstream users, can submit a proposal for the harmonised classification and labelling of substances, containing the information set out in Annex VI, Part 1 of this Regulation to the European Chemicals Agency. Generally, only substances satisfying the classification criteria for Category 1 respiratory sensitisation, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity or reproductive toxicity, or active ingredients in pesticides or biocides will be subject to such harmonisation, but other substances may be subject thereto if a necessity for harmonisation is demonstrated.

Within eighteen months from receipt of the proposal, the risk assessment committee of the Agency shall give an opinion on the proposal.

The Agency shall send this opinion to the Commission which, if it considers that harmonisation is appropriate, will include the substance and its classification and labelling elements in Annex VI, Part 3 of this Regulation.

The classification and labelling inventory

At the latest one month after having placed a substance on the market, the manufacturer or importer shall notify the Agency of information concerning its identity, the identity of the substance, hazard classes, concentration limits, etc. All this information shall be included in an inventory of classification and labelling that the Agency shall update on a regular basis.

Context

This Regulation supplements the REACH system for registration, assessment, authorisation and restrictions concerning chemical substances.

This Regulation amends Directive 67/548/EEC on chemical substances and Directive 1999/45/EC on mixtures and repeals them with effect from 1June 2015.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008

20.1.2009
1.12.2010 (Titles II, III and IV for substances)
1.6.2015 (Titles II, III and IV for mixtures)

OJ L 353, 31.12.2008

Amending act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 286/2011

19.4.2011

OJ L 83, 30.3.2011

AMENDMENTS TO THE ANNEXES

Annex I – Classification and labelling requirements
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].

Annex II – Special rules for labelling and packaging
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].

Annex III – List of hazard statements
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].

Annex IV – List of precautionary statements
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].

Annex V – Hazard pictograms
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].

Annex VI – List of harmonised classification and labelling of hazardous substances
Regulation (EC) No 790/2009 [Official Journal L 235 of 5.9.2009];
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].

Annexe VII – Translation table
Regulation (EU) No 286/2011 [Official Journal L 83 of 30.3.2011].