Tag Archives: Motor vehicle

Petrol vapour recovery during refuelling of vehicles

Petrol vapour recovery during refuelling of vehicles

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Petrol vapour recovery during refuelling of vehicles

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Air pollution

Petrol vapour recovery during refuelling of vehicles

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2009/126/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009 on Stage II petrol vapour recovery during refuelling of motor vehicles at service stations.

Summary

This Directive aims at ensuring that harmful petrol vapour displaced from the fuel tank of a motor vehicle during refuelling at a service station is recovered. The petrol pumps of many service stations in the European Union (EU) will have to be equipped to recover this vapour.

Service stations

This Directive applies to new service stations or those having undergone major refurbishment, of which the annual throughput must be in excess of 500 m3 of petrol. It imposes upon operators of these service stations an obligation to install a Stage II Petrol Vapour Recovery system or “Stage II PVR”. Furthermore, service stations with a throughput in excess of 100 m3 per year which are located under living accommodation must also install this equipment.

Larger existing service stations with a throughput in excess of 3 000 m3 per year must also apply Stage II PVR by 2018.

Stage II PVR equipment has already been installed in service stations in almost 50 % of the Member States. This Directive extends this practice to the whole European Union.

Minimum level of petrol vapour recovery

The Stage II PVR equipment installed on petrol pumps in service stations must capture 85 % of petrol vapour. The petrol vapour capture efficiency of such systems must be certified by the manufacturer in accordance with the relevant European technical standards or type approval procedures or, if there are no such standards or procedures, with any relevant national standard.

Stage II PVR equipment draws off petrol vapour. It is then transferred to a storage tank at the service station. The vapour/petrol ratio shall be equal to or greater than 0.95 but less than or equal to 1.05.

Periodic checks

The petrol vapour capture efficiency of Stage II petrol vapour recovery systems must be tested at least once a year. This test may be carried out either by checking the vapour/petrol ratio defined above under simulated petrol flow conditions, or by any other appropriate methodology.

If the service station has automatic monitoring equipment, capture efficiency shall be tested at least once every three years. If the tests detect anomalies, the service station operator must rectify the fault within seven days.

Consumer information

All service stations which have installed Stage II petrol vapour recovery systems must inform consumers thereof. In order to do this, the operator may place a sign, sticker or other notification on, or in the vicinity of, the petrol dispenser.

Context

This Directive comes under the Sixth Environment Action Programme adopted in July 2002 which established the need to reduce air pollution to levels which minimise harmful effects on human health and the environment.

This Directive supplements the technical specifications for the storage of petrol. These technical specifications are harmonised at European level by Directive 94/63/EC which forms Stage I of petrol vapour recovery.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2009/126/EC

31.10.2009

1.1.2012

OJ L 285 of 31.10.2009

General safety of motor vehicles

General safety of motor vehicles

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about General safety of motor vehicles

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical implications of road safety

General safety of motor vehicles

2 emissions.

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 661/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 July 2009 concerning type-approval requirements for the general safety of motor vehicles, their trailers and systems, components and separate technical units intended therefor (Text with EEA relevance).

Summary

This Regulation establishes requirements for the type-approval of:

  • the safety of motor vehicles and their trailers;
  • the energy efficiency of motor vehicles by introducing the mandatory installation of tyre pressure monitoring systems and gear shift indicators;
  • the safety and energy efficiency of tyres and their levels of noise emissions.

Types of vehicles concerned

This Regulation applies to:

  • motor vehicles used for the carriage of passengers having at least four wheels (category M);
  • motor vehicles intended for the transportation of goods having at least four wheels (category N);
  • trailers (category O).

Obligations of manufacturers

Manufacturers shall guarantee that new vehicles that are sold, registered or put into service within the European Union (EU) are type-approved in accordance with the provisions of this Regulation.

The Regulation aims at making several UNECE regulations obligatory. Type-approval in accordance with these UNECE regulations shall be considered as EC type-approval.

In order to improve road safety, all vehicles must be equipped with an electronic stability control system. Furthermore, vehicles in categories M2, M3, N2 and N3 must be equipped with an advanced emergency braking system and a lane departure warning system.

Tyres shall satisfy requirements relating to:

  • wet grip;
  • rolling resistance;
  • rolling noise.

In addition, vehicles in category M1 must be equipped with a tyre pressure monitoring system and gear shift indicators.

Obligations of the Member States

Member States shall not grant EC type-approval or national type-approval to vehicles which do not meet the requirements laid down in this Regulation.

Transitional provisions

This Regulation contributes to the simplification of legislation insofar as it repeals a considerable number of basic directives and their amending acts.

This Regulation repeals Directives 70/221/EEC, 70/222/EEC, 70/311/EEC, 70/387/EEC, 70/388/EEC, 71/320/EEC, 72/245/EEC, 74/60/EEC, 74/61/EEC, 74/297/EEC, 74/408/EEC, 74/483/EEC, 75/443/EEC, 76/114/EEC, 76/115/EEC, 76/756/EEC, 76/757/EEC, 76/758/EEC, 76/759/EEC, 76/760/EEC, 76/761/EEC, 76/762/EEC, 77/389/EEC, 77/538/EEC, 77/539/EEC, 77/540/EEC, 77/541/EEC, 77/649/EEC, 78/316/EEC, 78/317/EEC, 78/318/EEC, 78/549/EEC, 78/932/EEC, 89/297/EEC, 91/226/EEC, 92/21/EEC, 92/22/EEC, 92/24/EEC, 92/114/EEC, 94/20/EC, 95/28/EC, 96/27/EC, 96/79/EC, 97/27/EC, 98/91/EC, 2000/40/EC, 2001/56/EC, 2001/85/EC, and 2003/97/EC from 1 November 2014.

It repeals Directive 92/23/EC from 1 November 2017.

REFERENCES

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 661/2009

20.8.2009

OJ L 200 of 31.7.2009

EC type-approval system for motor vehicles

EC type-approval system for motor vehicles

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about EC type-approval system for motor vehicles

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical implications of road safety

EC type-approval system for motor vehicles

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2007/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 September 2007 establishing a framework for the approval of motor vehicles and their trailers and of systems, components and separate technical units intended for such vehicles.

Summary

The European Union (EU) is revising the system of EC type-approval for motor vehicles. The Directive retains (in revised form) the majority of the provisions of Directive 70/156/EEC and also introduces some entirely new concepts and requirements. It repeals and replaces Directive 70/156/EEC in order to have a clearer, more coherent text based on the principle of proportionality.

Scope

The requirement for EC type-approval for access to the internal market used to apply to private cars, motorcycles, mopeds and agricultural tractors. The European Union is extending this system to all categories of motor vehicles designed and constructed in one or more stages for use on the road and also to the systems, components and separate technical units designed and constructed for such vehicles. More precisely, the Directive is aimed at commercial vehicles (vans, lorries, semi-trailers, trailers), buses and coaches.

Type-approval system

The EC type-approval system is the only system in place for ensuring permanent monitoring of the conformity of output. Type-approval is based on the principle that manufacturers must issue a certificate of conformity for each vehicle manufactured, attesting that it conforms to the approved type. The manufacturer can opt for one of the following procedures: step-by-step type-approval *, single-step type-approval * or mixed type-approval *.

The Directive introduces a new EC type-approval method known as “multi-stage type-approval”. Each manufacturer involved in manufacturing a vehicle will fill in the part of the certificate relating to its own stage. The aim of this is to adapt the process to the specific nature of commercial vehicle manufacturing. The multi-stage procedure will generally involve two steps:

  • firstly, the initial manufacturer will obtain type-approval for a chassis (including the engine, wheels, shock absorbers, brakes, etc.) and a first EC type-approval certificate will be issued;
  • subsequently, the second manufacturer will assemble the bodywork and present the finished vehicle for type-approval. Where the same manufacturer is responsible for both chassis and bodywork, the vehicle may be type-approved using the time-honoured procedure for passenger cars.

The Directive is based on the principle of total harmonisation. EC type-approval procedures are compulsory and replace the national procedures with which they have co-existed up until now. The type-approval process is therefore noticeably simplified for manufacturers. It is enough for one Member State to type-approve a vehicle in order for all vehicles of that type to be registered throughout the Community solely on the basis of their certificate of conformity.

Improving road safety and environmental protection

The Directive aims to improve road safety by making a number of devices compulsory. These include ABS (anti-lock braking system), new and more effective rear-view mirrors (including the new front rear-view mirror), improved lights, side protection to prevent cyclists or pedestrians from being dragged under vehicles and anti-spray devices.

Furthermore, it lays down additional requirements for buses and coaches (emergency exits must be adapted to the number of people which the vehicle can hold, greater ease of access for persons with reduced mobility, sufficient “survival space” in the event of the vehicle rolling over etc.).

The Directive also focuses on various environmental obligations such as CO2 emissions, fuel consumption, engine power and smoke from diesel engines.

Timetable

The provisions of the proposal will be implemented from 2009 and will be phased in gradually until 2014, depending on the category of vehicle. The aim of the transition periods is to enable the industry to gradually adapt its production systems to the new requirements and enable governments to deal progressively with the increased number of requests for type-approval.

Background

Since 1970, Directive 70/156/EEC has been the main legal instrument for implementing the single market in the motor vehicle sector. It has been amended many times in order to keep pace with this sector’s constant development. It therefore seemed appropriate to increase its clarity by recasting it. Doing so also provides an opportunity to extend the scope of the established principles to new categories of motor vehicles.

The first stage of the revision, Directive 2001/116/EC, put in place the technical provisions needed for the practical implementation of the type-approval of commercial vehicles. This Directive marks the second stage of the revision of Directive 70/156/EEC.

Key terms of the act
  • Step-by-step type-approval: a vehicle-approval procedure consisting in the step-by-step collection of the whole set of EC type-approval certificates for the systems, components and separate technical units relating to the vehicle, and which leads, at the final stage, to the approval of the whole vehicle.
  • Single-step type-approval: a procedure consisting in the approval of a vehicle as a whole by means of a single operation.
  • Mixed type-approval: a step-by-step type-approval procedure for which one or more system approvals are achieved during the final stage of the approval of the whole vehicle, without it being necessary to issue the EC type-approval certificates for those systems.

Reference

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2007/46/EC

29.10.2007

29.4.2009

OJ L 263, 9.10.2007

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 2007/46/EC have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated version is for reference purpose only.

LAST AMENDMENTS TO THE ANNEXES

Annex IV – List of requirements for the purpose of EC type-approval of vehicles
Commission Regulation (EU) No 183/2011 [Official Journal L 53 of 26.2.2011].

Annex VI
Commission Regulation (EU) No 183/2011 [Official Journal L 53 of 26.2.2011].

Compulsory fitting of safety belts

Compulsory fitting of safety belts

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Compulsory fitting of safety belts

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical implications of road safety

Compulsory fitting of safety belts

Acts

Directive 2005/39/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 September 2005 amending Council Directive 74/408/EEC relating to motor vehicles with regard to the seats, their anchorages and head restraints.

Directive 2005/40/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 September 2005 amending Council Directive 77/541/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to safety belts and restraint systems of motor vehicles.

Directive 2005/41/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 September 2005 amending Council Directive 76/115/EEC on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to anchorages for motor-vehicle safety belts.

Summary

The three Directives make it compulsory to fit safety belts in all vehicles, thereby improving their passive safety.

Fitting and use of safety belts

As many vehicles as possible must be fitted with safety belts in order to ensure the optimum effectiveness of the measures relating to the compulsory use of belts fitted in vehicles, an obligation imposed by Directive 91/671/EEC, as amended by Directive 2003/20/EC.

Failure to use the safety belt is the second-biggest cause of deaths, after non-observance of speed limits and before drunken driving. The obligations to fit and use safety belts will bring about a substantial improvement in road safety within the European Union and a reduction in the number of victims of road accidents.

Scope

The obligation to fit safety belts, initially relating to cars, is henceforth extended to all categories of vehicles and therefore to all commercial vehicles, particularly coaches and minibuses. The compulsory fitting of safety belts in coaches in particular is intended to prevent the risks of passengers being thrown out when coaches overturn after leaving the road, which is the most frequent accident for this type of vehicles.

Technical requirements

The three Directives establish a uniform legal framework for manufacturers by defining the technical requirements which motor vehicles must meet with regard to:

  • seats, seat anchorages and head restraints (Directive 2005/39/EC amending Directive 74/408/EEC);
  • safety belts and restraint systems (Directive 2005/40/EC amending Directive 77/541/EEC);
  • safety-belt anchorages (Directive 2005/41/EC amending Directive 76/115/EEC).

Timetable

The provisions of the three Directives apply, from 20 October 2006, to the new types of vehicles and will be extended, from 20 October 2007, to vehicles of the type already in production.

Safety belts for disabled persons

Technical standards relating to safety belts for disabled persons will be drawn up in the near future in order to ensure a level of safety equivalent to that laid down by the present Directives.

Context

The obligations relating to the fitting and use of safety belts help to achieve the objective, set by the European Commission in its European Action Programme for Road Safety of reducing the number of victims of road accidents by half by 2010.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2005/39/EC 20.10.2005 20.04.2006 OJ L 255 of 30.09.2005
Directive 2005/40/EC 20.10.2005 20.04.2006 OJ L 255 of 30.09.2005
Directive 2005/41/EC 20.10.2005 20.04.2006 OJ L 255 of 30.09.2005

Related Acts

Council Directive 91/671/EEC of 16 December 1991 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to compulsory use of safety belts in vehicles of less than 3.5 tonnes [OJ L 373 of 31.12.1991];

Directive 2003/20/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 April 2003 amending Directive 91/671/EEC [OJ L 115 of 09.05.2003].

The obligation to use the safety belt when the vehicle is in motion is extended to all categories of vehicles and to all seats fitted with one (Directive 2003/20/EC). It related initially only to vehicles of less than 3.5 tonnes fitted with restraint systems and, for certain vehicles (coaches, light goods vehicles), did not apply to the back seats (Directive 91/671/EEC).

The use of restraint systems specially adapted to the size and weight of children also becomes compulsory (Directive 2003/20/EC). Research has emphasised that the use of restraint systems for children can help to attenuate considerably the seriousness of injuries in the event of an accident. Children were initially authorised to travel without being restrained by an appropriate device if one was not available (Directive 91/671/EEC).

Certain exemptions may be granted, particularly in order to allow certain professional activities to be carried out efficiently, to ensure the proper functioning of activities relating to law-and-order, safety or emergency services, or to take account of the special conditions in certain types of transport.

These new provisions come into force in the Member States from 9 May 2006.

 

Vulnerable road users and frontal protection systems

Vulnerable road users and frontal protection systems

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Vulnerable road users and frontal protection systems

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical implications of road safety

Vulnerable road users and frontal protection systems

Technical requirements for the frontal protection systems of motor vehicles are laid down with the aim of improving the protection of pedestrians and other vulnerable road users in the event of a collision with a vehicle equipped with such a system.

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2005/66/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 26 October 2005 relating to the use of frontal protection systems on motor vehicles and amending Council Directive 70/156/EEC.

Summary

Frontal protection systems or “bull bars”, which are increasingly common and present an increased safety risk to pedestrians and other vulnerable road users, must now meet certain technical requirements.

The improvement of the frontal structures of vehicles actually helps to considerably attenuate the severity of injuries to pedestrians and other vulnerable road users, particularly if the vehicle is moving at reduced speed (under 40 km/h) at the time of collision.

Scope

The vehicles covered by the Directive are passenger cars and light commercial vehicles (category M1 and N1 vehicles weighing less than 3.5 tonnes).

The technical requirements of the Directive apply not only to frontal protection systems fitted to a vehicle as original equipment but also to systems supplied as separate technical units.

Technical requirements

The Directive lays down technical requirements for the testing, construction and installation of frontal protection systems. These requirements form part of the Community type-approval procedure established by Directive 70/156/EEC.

Timetable

These provisions apply from 25 November 2006 to new types of vehicles as well as to new types of frontal protection systems supplied as separate technical units.

As of 25 May 2007, they will apply to all new vehicles and all frontal protection systems available as separate technical units.

By 25 August 2010 at the latest, the Commission will re-examine these provisions in the light of technical progress and experience gained.

Context

The technical requirements laid down for frontal protection systems are part of the recent focus on the protection of pedestrians and other vulnerable road users, particularly under Directive 2003/102/EC relating to the protection of pedestrians and other vulnerable road users before and in the event of a collision with a motor vehicle. Road safety measures have thus been extended beyond the protection of only the occupants of vehicles.

The technical requirements laid down for frontal protection systems help to achieve the objective set by the European Commission in its European Road Safety Action Programme to halve the number of road accident victims by 2010.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2005/66/EC 15.12.2005 25.08.2006 OJ L 309 of 25.11.2005

Related Act

Directive 2003/102/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 November 2003 relating to the protection of pedestrians and other vulnerable road usersbefore and in the event of a collision with a motor vehicle and amending Council Directive 70/156/EEC [OJ L 321 of 6.12.2003].

Protection of pedestrians and vulnerable road users

Protection of pedestrians and vulnerable road users

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Protection of pedestrians and vulnerable road users

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical implications of road safety

Protection of pedestrians and vulnerable road users

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 78/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 January 2009 on the type-approval of motor vehicles with regard to the protection of pedestrians and other vulnerable road users, amending Directive 2007/46/EC and repealing Directives 2003/102/EC and 2005/66/EC (Text with EEA relevance).

Summary

This Regulation lays down requirements for the construction and functioning of motor vehicles and frontal protection systems *. The aim is to reduce the number and severity of injuries to pedestrians and other vulnerable road users hit by the front of a vehicle.

To which types of vehicle does the Regulation apply?

This Regulation applies to:

  • motor vehicles of category M1 defined in Annex II of the Directive on the EC type-approval system for motor vehicles;
  • motor vehicles of category N1 defined in Annex II of the above-mentioned Directive;
  • frontal protection systems of those vehicles, fitted as original equipment to the vehicles or supplied as separate units.

What are the obligations of the manufacturers?

Manufacturers shall ensure that vehicles placed on the market are equipped with a type-approved brake assist system (BAS) *. They may add a frontal protection system which must comply with the criteria laid down in this Regulation. They shall communicate data on the specifications and test conditions of the vehicles to the vehicle approval authorities.

The manufacturer shall submit to the authorities an application for EC type-approval in the form of an information document containing general information, construction characteristics and information relating to the bodywork of the vehicle.

What are the obligations of the authorities of the Member States?

The approval authority shall grant EC type-approval by type of vehicle where the relevant requirements are met by the manufacturer. Three types of letter are granted according to the requirements met by the vehicle, namely letter A (corresponding to the first level of minimum protection), B (corresponding to the second level of protection) or X (corresponding to a level of protection for certain specific vehicles).

National authorities shall not grant EC type-approval if the frontal protection system does not meet the relevant requirements laid down in this Regulation. On the other hand, vehicles equipped with collision avoidance systems may not have to fulfil the test requirements laid down in this Regulation in the future, upon assessment by the European Commission.

Context

This Regulation repeals Directives 2003/102/EC and 2005/66/EC.

Key terms of the Act
  • Frontal protection system: a separate structure or structures, such as a bull bar, or a supplementary bumper which, in addition to the original-equipment bumper, is intended to protect the external surface of the vehicle from damage in the event of a collision with an object. Structures having a mass of less than 0.5 kg, intended to protect only the vehicle’s lights, are excluded from this definition.
  • Brake assist system (BAS): a braking system with an anti-lock device (ABS) which detects in a fraction of a second that the driver is attempting an emergency brake and triggers the brake automatically in order to achieve the shortest possible braking distance.

Reference

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 78/2009

24.2.2009

OJ L 35 of 4.2.2009

Motor vehicles and their trailers: roadworthiness test

Motor vehicles and their trailers: roadworthiness test

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Motor vehicles and their trailers: roadworthiness test

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Motor vehicles and their trailers: roadworthiness test

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2009/40/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 on roadworthiness tests for motor vehicles and their trailers (Recast).

Summary

Motor vehicles registered in a European Union (EU) country and their trailers must undergo periodic roadworthiness tests. Annexes I and II to this directive detail the categories of vehicles to be tested, the frequency of the roadworthiness tests and the items which must be tested. The roadworthiness tests must be undertaken by the EU countries, or by a public body that has been entrusted with the task, or by bodies or establishments designated and directly supervised.

Annex I details the categories of motor vehicles that will be subject to roadworthiness tests and the required frequency of the tests for each category. The minimum testing frequency for the different categories of motor vehicles and their trailers is:

  • One year after the date on which the vehicle was first used, and thereafter annually for:
    • motor vehicles used for the carriage of passengers and with more than eight seats, excluding the driver’s seat;
    • motor vehicles used for the carriage of goods and having a maximum permissible mass exceeding 3 500 kg;
    • trailers and semi-trailers with a maximum permissible mass exceeding 3 500 kg;
    • taxis, ambulances;
  • Four years after the date on which the vehicle was first used, and thereafter every two years for:
    • motor vehicles having at least four wheels, normally used for the road carriage of goods and with a maximum permissible mass not exceeding 3 500 kg, excluding agricultural tractors and machinery;
    • motor vehicles having at least four wheels, used for the carriage of passengers and with not more than eight seats excluding the driver’s seat.

Annex II sets out which items must be compulsorily tested. The tests covered by Annex II should be undertaken using techniques and equipment available without the use of tools to disassemble or remove any part of the vehicle. Where the motor vehicle is found to be defective with regard to the test items below, the competent authority in the EU country concerned must set specific conditions under which the particular vehicle may be used before passing another roadworthiness test. The test must cover the items listed in the annex, provided that these are related to the equipment of the vehicle being tested in the EU country concerned. The compulsory test items include:

  • vehicle identification;
  • braking equipment;
  • steering;
  • visibility;
  • lighting equipment and parts of electric system;
  • axles, wheels, tyres and suspension;
  • chassis and chassis attachments;
  • other equipment – safety belts, fire extinguisher, locks and anti-theft device, warning triangle, first-aid kit, speedometer, etc;
  • nuisance – noise, exhaust emissions, etc;
  • supplementary tests for public transport vehicles – emergency exit(s), heating and ventilation systems, seat layout, interior lighting;

The vehicle operator or driver must be informed in writing of any defects, the result of the test and the legal consequences. EU countries will take the necessary measures to make it possible to prove that a vehicle has passed a roadworthiness test. Other EU countries and the Commission will be informed of these measures. All EU countries will mutually recognise the proof issued in another EU country showing that a vehicle registered in that other EU country, together with its trailer or semi-trailer, has passed a roadworthiness test in compliance with the provisions of this directive. EU countries will also implement all appropriate measures to establish that the brake performance of motor vehicles registered in their country complies with the requirements of this directive.

Exceptions

Notwithstanding the provisions of Annexes I and II, EU countries have the right to:

  • bring forward the date for the first compulsory roadworthiness test and, where appropriate, require the vehicle to be submitted for test prior to registration;
  • shorten the interval between two successive compulsory tests;
  • make the testing of optional equipment compulsory;
  • increase the number of items to be tested;
  • extend the periodic test requirement to other categories of vehicles;
  • prescribe special additional tests;
  • require vehicles registered on their territory to have higher minimum standards for braking efficiency than those specified in Annex II and include a test on vehicles with heavier loads, provided such requirements do not exceed those of the vehicle’s original type-approval.

EU countries also have the right to exclude vehicles belonging to the armed forces, the forces of law and order and the fire service from the scope of this directive. After consultation with the Commission, EU countries may exclude from the requirements of this directive certain motor vehicles operated or used in exceptional conditions, and motor vehicles which are never, or hardly ever, used on public highways. Following consultation with the Commission, EU countries also have the right to set their own testing standards for vehicles considered to be of historic interest.

The Commission will adopt all necessary directives to define the minimum standards and methods for testing the items listed in Annex II of this directive, as well as any amendments necessary to adapt to technical progress in these areas.

Within three years from the introduction of regular testing of speed limitation devices, the Commission will re-examine whether the tests laid down are sufficient to detect defective or manipulated speed limitation devices or whether the rules need to be modified.

This directive repeals Directive 96/96/EC.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2009/40/EC

26.6.2009

OJ L 141 of 6.6.2009

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 2009/40/EC have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purposes only.

Related Acts

Commission Recommendation 2010/378/EU of 5 July 2010 on the assessment of defects during roadworthiness testing in accordance with Directive 2009/40/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council on roadworthiness tests for motor vehicles and their trailers [Official Journal L 173 of 8.7.2010].

Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: Policy orientations on road safety 2011-20

rd road safety action programme, the Commission has published policy orientations on road safety to provide a general framework, under which concrete action can be taken at European, national, regional or local levels from 2011 until 2020.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Communication of 20 July 2010 to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – “Towards a European road safety area: policy orientations on road safety 2011-2020” [COM(2010) 389 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Although progress was made on road safety in the European Union (EU) during the 3rd European road safety action programme (2003-10), the Commission highlights that efforts to improve road safety need to be further strengthened. This 3rd road safety action programme (RSAP) included an ambitious target to halve the number of road deaths by 2010 as well as numerous proposals for concrete actions in vehicle safety, safety of infrastructure and users’ safety. Although the Commission accepts that the initial target was not likely to be met by the end of 2010, the RSAP has encouraged EU countries to be more proactive in improving road safety and has gone a long way to dramatically reduce the number of fatalities on EU roads.

The European road safety policy orientations 2011-20 aims to provide a general framework and challenging objectives to guide national and local strategies, in accordance with the principle of subsidiarity. Within the general framework, the Commission highlights the need to:

  • create a cooperation framework based on the exchange of best practices across the EU;
  • adopt a strategy for injuries and first aid to address the need to reduce the number of road injuries;
  • improve the safety of vulnerable road users.

Principles and target

The Commission sets out three main principles:

  • striving for the highest road safety standards throughout Europe – by encouraging EU citizens to take primary responsibility for their own safety and the safety of others on EU roads, and by focusing on improving the safety of more vulnerable road users;
  • an integrated approach to road safety – through cooperation with other EU policy areas, such as energy, environment, education, innovation and technology, and justice.
  • subsidiarity, proportionality and shared responsibility – through the concept of shared responsibility, commitment and concrete actions at all levels from EU countries and their authorities to regional and local bodies.

Following the RSAP 2003-10, the Commission proposes to maintain the target of halving the overall number of road deaths in the EU between 2010 and 2020. This ambitious target demonstrates the EU’s clear commitment towards road safety and having a common objective is intended to provide EU citizens with a more uniform level of road safety within the EU. The Commission encourages individual EU countries to contribute to the achievement of this common target through their own national road safety strategies.

During the public consultation for these policy orientations, which took place between July and December 2009, a target for reducing road traffic severe injuries was proposed. Once a common definition exists for ‘severe injuries’, the Commission will propose to add a common “injuries reduction target” to these European road safety policy orientations up to 2020.

Strategic objectives

The Commission has identified seven objectives, for which actions will be proposed at both EU and national level:

  • improve education and training of road users – the quality of the licensing and training system needs to be improved, with emphasis on young drivers. The Commission will work with EU countries to develop a common educational and training road safety strategy including pre-test learning, the driving licence test, and post-licence training;
  • increase enforcement of road rules – the Commission, the European Parliament and the Council will work together to establish a cross-border exchange of information in the area of road safety. The Commission will also work towards a common road safety enforcement strategy which will involve enforcement campaigns, national enforcement objectives, and vehicle technology to assist enforcement, including the possibility of speed limiters in light commercial vehicles and alcohol interlock devices;
  • safer road infrastructure – the Commission will ensure that European funds will only be granted to infrastructure that complies with the EU safety requirements. The Commission will also promote the application of the relevant principles of safe management to the secondary road network of EU countries, in particular through the exchange of best practices.
  • safer vehicles – as well as continue to encourage the progress of vehicle safety, the Commission will also evaluate and propose actions in the area of harmonisation and progressive strengthening of EU legislation on roadworthiness tests and on technical roadside inspections;
  • promote the use of modern technology to increase road safety – the Commission will continue to promote the use of Intelligent Transport Systems to improve road traffic safety. The effectiveness and speed of rescue will be enhanced by the adoption of the European emergency call service fitted to vehicles, ‘eCall’;
  • improve emergency and post-injuries services – the Commission will propose the establishment of a global strategy of action on road injuries and first aid. The Commission will in particular examine the means to improve the efficiency of first aid intervention and post-care handling in order to reduce the impact of road accidents.
  • protect vulnerable road users – the Commission will work to improve the safety of motorcyclists, addressing behaviour, as well as vehicle and infrastructure safety. It will also encourage the establishment of adequate infrastructures to increase the safety of cycling and other vulnerable road users.

Implementation of the European road safety policy orientations 2011-20

A framework for open cooperation between EU countries and the Commission will be established to facilitate the implementation of the EU road safety policy. Parallel to this, EU countries should also develop national road safety plans including specific national objectives which are individual to their particular situation.

The Commission will pursue the improvement of the existing tools for data collection and analysis, such as CARE, the EU database on road accidents established in accordance with Council Decision 93/704/EC, as well as the European Road Safety Observatory (ERSO), which makes publicly available through the Internet road safety data and knowledge at European level.

Direction indicator lamps for motor vehicles with trailers

Direction indicator lamps for motor vehicles with trailers

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Direction indicator lamps for motor vehicles with trailers

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical harmonisation for motor vehicles

Direction indicator lamps for motor vehicles with trailers (until 2014)

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 76/759/EEC of 27 July 1976 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to direction indicator lamps for motor vehicles and their trailers [See amendingacts].

Summary

Each Member State must grant component EC type-approval for any type of direction indicator lamp which satisfies the construction and testing requirements laid down in the Annexes to the Directive, and issue an EC component type-approval mark conforming to the model shown in the Annex to the Directive for each type. The Member State which has granted EC component type-approval must take the measures required in order to verify that production models conform to the approved type.

According to the system of granting approval set out in the Directive, Member States may not:

  • prohibit the placing on the market of direction indicator lamps on grounds relating to their construction or method of functioning if they bear the EC component type-approval mark;
  • refuse to grant EC type-approval or national type-approval of any vehicle on grounds relating to its direction indicator lamps if these bear the EC component type-approval mark and are fitted in accordance with the requirements laid down in Directive 76/756/EEC;
  • refuse or prohibit the sale, registration, entry into service or use of any vehicle on grounds relating to its direction indicator lamps if these bear the EC component type-approval mark and are fitted in accordance with the requirements laid down in Directive 76/756/EEC.

Nevertheless, a Member State may prohibit the placing on the market of direction indicator lamps bearing the EC component type-approval mark which consistently fail to conform to the approved type.

This Directive is repealed by Regulation (EC) No 661/2009 from 1 November 2014.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for implementation in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 76/759/EC

30.7.1976

1.7.1977

OJ L 262 of 27.9.1976

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 1999/15/EC

2.5.1999

1.10.1999

OJ L 97 of 12.4.1999

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 76/759/EC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated version  is for reference only.

Headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps for motor vehicles

Headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps for motor vehicles

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps for motor vehicles

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Motor vehicles > Technical harmonisation for motor vehicles

Headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps for motor vehicles (until 2014)

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 76/761/EEC of 27 July 1976 on the approximation of the laws of the Member States relating to motor-vehicle headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps and to incandescent electric filament lamps for such headlamps [See amending acts].

Summary

Each Member State must grant component type-approval for any type of headlamp which functions as a main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamp, and any type of light source (incandescent and other lamps) for such headlamps which satisfy the construction and testing requirements laid down in the Annexes to the Directive. The Member State which has granted EC component type-approval must take the measures required in order to verify that production models conform to the approved type.

Member States must issue an EC component type-approval mark for each type of headlamp which functions as a main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamp and for each type of light source for such headlamps.

According to the system of granting approval set out in the Directive, Member States may not:

  • prohibit the placing on the market of headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps on grounds relating to their construction or method of functioning if they bear the EC component type-approval mark.
  • refuse to grant EC type-approval or national type-approval or prohibit the sale, registration, entry into service or use of any vehicle on grounds relating to headlamps which function as main-beam and/or dipped-beam headlamps if these bear the EC component type-approval mark and are fitted in accordance with the requirements laid down in Directive 76/756/EEC.

This Directive is repealed by Regulation (EC) No 661/2009 from 1 November 2014.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for implementation in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 76/761/EEC

30.7.1976

1.7.1977

OJ L 262 of 27.9.1976

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 1999/17/EC

2.5.1999

1.10.1999

JO L 97 of 12.4.1999

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 76/761/EEC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated version is for reference only.