Tag Archives: Maritime safety

A strategy for better ship dismantling practices

A strategy for better ship dismantling practices

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about A strategy for better ship dismantling practices

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Waterborne transport

A strategy for better ship dismantling practices

Many decommissioned European ships end up on the beaches of South Asia where they are dismantled. The absence of environmental protection and safety measures results in a high rate of accidents, health risks and large-scale pollution affecting vast expanses of the coast. The strategy proposed to improve ship dismantling practices includes action aimed at contributing to the implemention of the main elements of an international convention on the recycling of ships which has just been adopted. It also provides for measures aimed at encouraging voluntary action by the maritime transport sector and better application of current Community legislation on waste shipments.

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 19 November 2008 – An EU strategy for better ship dismantling [COM(2008) 767 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The European Union (EU) strategy gives effect to the 2007 Green Paper on better ship dismantling practices. This strategy should guarantee that ships with a strong link to the Union (in terms of flag or ownership) are dismantled only in safe and environmentally sound facilities, in line with the Hong Kong Convention developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and adopted on 19 May 2009.

Such a strategy complies with Regulation (EC) No 1013/2006 on waste shipments which transposes the Basel Convention. It thus aims to prevent the export of hazardous end-of-life ships from the EU to developing countries, and to protect human health and the environment during dismantling operations, without creating unnecessary new economic burdens.

Main elements of the strategy proposed by the Commission

The EU strategy proposes a series of measures aimed at improving ship dismantling conditions as soon as possible, in particular during the interim period preceding the entry into force of the new IMO convention. The following measures are envisaged in particular:

  • start preparations to introduce measures on key elements of the new IMO convention, in particular concerning surveys, certification and the inventory of hazardous materials present on board ships;
  • encourage voluntary industry action through various measures, such as awards for exemplary “green” recycling activities, the publication of guidelines and a list of “clean” dismantling facilities.
  • provide technical assistance and support to developing countries for training programmes in safety and the establishment of basic infrastructure for environmental and health protection;
  • improve the application of current rules on waste shipments by intensifying controls in European ports, enhancing cooperation and exchange of information between European authorities and the establishment of a list of ships ready for scrapping.

The strategy also proposes that the Commission should examine the feasibility of the following measures:

  • establish auditing and certification of ship recycling facilities worldwide and evaluate how EU ships might be encouraged to use this scheme;
  • ensure that warships and other government vessels which do not come under the scope of the convention be subject to Community rules for their “clean” dismantling;
  • establish a mandatory international funding system for “clean” ship dismantling.

Context

The preparation of an EU strategy for environmentally sound ship dismantling practices is one of the elements of the Commission action plan on an integrated maritime policy for the European Union.

This Communication has the aim of encouraging debate and paving the way for the legislative proposal to be presented after the adoption of the Hong Kong Convention in May 2009.

Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Waterborne transport

Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 725/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 31 March 2004 on enhancing ship and port facility security [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The main objective of this regulation is to implement European Union (EU) measures aimed at enhancing the security of ships and port facilities in the face of threats of intentional unlawful acts.

The regulation is intended to provide a basis for the harmonised interpretation and implementation and EU monitoring of the special measures to enhance maritime security adopted by the Diplomatic Conference of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in 2002, which amended the 1974 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS Convention) and established the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code).

The amendments to the SOLAS Convention and Part A of the ISPS Code are mandatory, but subject to interpretation. Part B of the Code consists of recommendations which the EU countries are called on to implement.

This regulation contains preventive measures and transposes the part of the SOLAS Convention on special measures to enhance maritime security and, at the same time, the ISPS Code, two of the cornerstones of maritime security at world level.

EU countries are required to communicate to the IMO, the Commission and the other EU countries the information requested and the special measures adopted to enhance maritime security under the SOLAS Convention.

Alongside this, each EU country must draw up the list of port facilities concerned on the basis of the port facility security assessments carried out and establish the scope of the measures taken to enhance maritime security. This list must be communicated to the other EU countries and to the Commission by 1 July 2004 at the latest.

EU countries must vigorously monitor compliance with the security rules by ships intending to enter an EU port, whatever their origin.

Security checks in the port may be carried out by the competent maritime security authorities of the EU countries, but also, as regards the international ship security certificate, by inspectors acting in the framework of port State control, as provided for in Directive 95/21/EC.

When a ship announces its intention to enter a port in an EU country, the competent maritime security authority of that country should demand that the information be provided at least 24 hours in advance or, if the voyage time is less than 24 hours, at the latest at the time the ship leaves the previous port or, if the port of call is not known, as soon as the port of call becomes known.

EU countries are required to designate a focal point for maritime security by 1 July 2004 at the latest. This authority should require each ship intending to enter port to provide, in advance, information concerning its international ship security certificate and the levels of safety at which it operates and has previously operated.

EU countries are required to apply the new security measures to international shipping and, by 1 July 2005, to Class A passenger ships operating domestic services.

After a security risk assessment, EU countries must decide the extent to which they will apply, by 1 July 2007, the provisions of this regulation to other categories of ships operating domestic services, their companies and the port facilities serving them.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 725/2004

19.5.2004

OJ L 129 of 29.4.2004

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 219/2009

20.4.2009

OJ L 87 of 31.3.2009

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EC) No 324/2008 of 9 April 2008 laying down revised procedures for conducting Commission inspections in the field of maritime security [Official Journal L 98 of 10.4.2008].

The Commission carries out security inspections at port facilities and companies in EU countries. These inspections are prepared with assistance from the European Maritime Safety Agency and are conducted by inspectors from the EU countries. The Commission must send its inspection report within six weeks of the completion of an inspection. Such reports must detail the findings of the inspection and identify any non-conformity with Regulation (EC) No 725/2004 or Directive 2005/65/EC. They may also contain recommendations for corrective action. The EU country concerned must reply within three months, providing an action plan, specifying actions and deadlines, to remedy any identified shortcomings.

Maritime safety: marine equipment

Maritime safety: marine equipment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime safety: marine equipment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Waterborne transport

Maritime safety: marine equipment

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 96/98/EC of 20 December 1996 on marine equipment [See amending acts].

Summary

This Directive applies to equipment (Annex A) * for use:

  • on board a new European * ship, even if it was constructed outside of the EU;
  • on an existing European ship in order to replace equipment or to install additional equipment.

This Directive does not concern equipment placed on board a ship before its entry into force.

Conformity assessment

Member States appoint bodies responsible for assessing conformity of marine equipment (Annex B). This assessment aims at:

  • ensuring the quality of equipment before being placed on the market;
  • checking marine equipment when issuing or renewing the safety certificate.

Equipment conforming to European standards must bear a mark.

Where a vessel, which is to be transferred to the register of a Member State is not registered in the EU, that State carries out an inspection in order to establish the actual condition of the equipment and whether it complies with European standards.

Non-compliant equipment

If a piece of equipment may compromise the health and/or safety of the crew or passengers, or to damage the marine environment, the Member State responsible shall withdraw it from the market, prohibit or restrict its use.

Testing standards

Certain types of marine equipment require international testing standards to be adopted. In cases where international organisations do not adopt the standards within a reasonable timescale, the standards of European standardisation organisations may be applied.

Key terms
  • Marine equipment: any article which could be used on board a vessel, voluntarily or in accordance with international rules, and for which the administration of the flag State must give its authorisation. In particular, this relates to life saving, fire protection, navigation and radiocommunication equipment.
  • European vessel: any vessel for which safety certificates are issued by EU Member States or in their name.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 96/98/EC

1.1.1999

30.6.1998

OJ L 46, 17.2.1997

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 98/85/EC

28.11.1998

30.4.1999

OJ L 315, 25.11.1998

Directive 2002/84/EC

29.11.2002

23.11.2003

OJ L 324, 29.11.2002

Directive 2008/67/EC

21.7.2008

21.7.2008

OJ L 171, 1.7.2008

Regulation (EC) 596/2009

7.8.2009

OJ L 188, 18.7.2009

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 96/98/EC have been incorporated into the basic text. This consolidated versionis for information only.

Related Acts

Proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on marine equipment and repealing Directive 96/98/EC [COM (2012) 772 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Strategy to strengthen global governance of seas and oceans

Strategy to strengthen global governance of seas and oceans

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Strategy to strengthen global governance of seas and oceans

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Maritime Affairs And Fisheries > Maritime affairs

Strategy to strengthen global governance of seas and oceans

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission of 15 October 2009 – Developing the international dimension of the Integrated Maritime Policy of the European Union [COM(2009) 536 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

In this Communication, the Commission describes its strategy to strengthen its authority in multilateral and bilateral relations in the domain of maritime affairs. This strategy should allow the European Union (EU) to exercise greater influence over international debate on marine issues in order to safeguard its economic and social interests and increase protection of the environment. It should also contribute to sustainable maritime governance at global level.

This strategy covers a number of domains (for example the protection of marine biodiversity, climate change, maritime safety and security, working conditions on board ships and research into the marine environment) which necessitate international and integrated solutions.

European Union strategy

In order to improve global governance of seas and oceans, the EU must in particular:

  • strengthen its role as a global player through greater and more unified participation in multilateral fora;
  • promote membership of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) at global level;
  • establish high-level dialogues on maritime affairs with key partners, ensuring synergies with existing sectoral dialogues in other policy areas;
  • pursue dialogue on Integrated Maritime Policy (IMP) bilaterally through both European Neighbourhood Policy instruments and multilateral dialogue. Dialogue on IMP may be based on the frameworks put in place at sea-basin-level (e.g. Union for the Mediterranean, Northern Dimension, Black Sea Synergy). It can be supplemented by sharing best practices concerning the implementation of IMP instruments with countries neighbouring the EU and by encouraging these countries to use the instruments;
  • continue to work on moving oceans and coasts higher up the climate change agenda and provide assistance to developing coastal and island states in this field, in line with the EU development cooperation strategies and initiatives;
  • continue to support an integrated approach to the conservation and sustainable use of marine biodiversity, particularly in areas beyond national jurisdiction, including for the establishment of marine protected areas;
  • pursue its cooperation with the ILO to encourage decent working conditions in the maritime sector;
  • pursue its actions to ensure freedom, safety and security of navigation, including actions against piracy;
  • continue and strengthen cooperation in research activities with third countries in order to enhance participation in large-scale international research programmes and with countries neighbouring the EU in order to define common regional marine research strategies;
  • ensure coherence between the activities of various organisations, notably in the fisheries, environment and transport fields;
  • encourage the OECD to develop a structure for exchange of best practices on integrated approaches to maritime affairs;
  • develop strategies for all relevant shared sea basins.

Context

The EU must pursue its efforts to improve dialogue with its neighbours, at both bilateral and regional level, including by concluding Regional Seas Conventions.

Regional approaches have already been launched for the Arctic, the Baltic, and the Mediterranean. The preparation of similar approaches for other sea basins is now of paramount importance. The EU can thus contribute to extending Integrated Maritime Policy at global level.

Maritime safety: Community monitoring, control and information system for maritime traffic

Maritime safety: Community monitoring, control and information system for maritime traffic

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime safety: Community monitoring, control and information system for maritime traffic

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Intelligent transport and navigation by satellite

Maritime safety: Community monitoring, control and information system for maritime traffic

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2002/59/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 June 2002 establishing a Community vessel traffic monitoring and information system and repealing Council Directive 93/75/EEC [See amending act].

Summary

This directive is part of the action taken in line with the Commission’s second communication on maritime safety following the Erika disaster (the Erika II package).

Setting up a European Union (EU) vessel traffic monitoring and information system should help to prevent accidents and pollution at sea and to minimise their impact on the marine and coastal environment, and on the economy and health of local communities.

All ships of 300 gross tonnage and upwards are covered, whether or not they carry dangerous goods, except for:

  • warships;
  • fishing vessels, traditional ships and recreational craft less than 45 metres in length;
  • bunkers below 5 000 tons.

Ship reporting and monitoring

The operator of a ship bound for a port of an EU country must notify certain information (ship identification, total number of persons on board, port of destination, estimated time of arrival) to the port authority at least twenty-four hours in advance, where this is feasible.

The directive stipulates that ships built on or after 1 July 2002 and calling at a port of an EU country must be fitted with:

  • an automatic identification system (AIS), as well as
  • a voyage data recorder (VDR) system (“black box”) to facilitate investigations following accidents.

EU countries have until the end of June 2007 to provide themselves with appropriate equipment and staff to utilise the AIS and VDR information and until the end of June 2008 to coordinate their national systems with those of the other EU countries.

The process of building up all necessary equipment and shore-based installations for implementing this directive must be completed by the end of 2007.

Notification of dangerous or polluting goods on board ships

In respect of the carriage of dangerous or polluting goods on board ships:

  • the shipper is required to deliver a declaration containing certain information (correct technical names of the dangerous or polluting goods, address from which detailed information on the cargo may be obtained) to the master or operator prior to taking the goods on board;
  • the operator, agent or master of a ship must also notify the general information, such as the ship identification and the information provided by the shipper, to the competent authority.

Monitoring of hazardous ships and intervention in the event of incidents and accidents at sea

EU countries which have been notified of the presence of hazardous ships (ships which have been involved in incidents or accidents at sea, have failed to comply with notification and reporting requirements, have deliberately discharged pollutants or have been refused access to ports) must transmit the information they have to the EU countries concerned.

EU countries must take all appropriate measures consistent with international law to deal with incidents or accidents at sea and to require the parties concerned (the operator, the master of the ship and the owner of the dangerous or polluting goods carried on board) to cooperate fully with them with a view to minimising the consequences of the incident.

In addition, the master of a ship must immediately report:

  • any incident or accident affecting the safety of the ship;
  • any incident or accident which compromises shipping safety;
  • any situation liable to lead to pollution of the waters or shore of a EU country;
  • any slick of polluting materials and containers or packages seen drifting at sea.

The directive provides for the possibility of ships being prevented from leaving or entering port in the event of poor weather conditions and obliges EU countries to set up places of refuge to accommodate ships in distress.

The Commission will look into the possibility of setting up a system to compensate ports accommodating ships in distress.

Accompanying measures

Ships entering the area of competence of a vessel traffic service must comply with any International Maritime Organisation (IMO) approved ships’ routing systems, which cover sensitive areas, areas with a high traffic density and areas dangerous for shipping, and must use the vessel traffic services. EU countries must ensure that these facilities have the requisite human and technical resources to accomplish their tasks.

EU countries will have to cooperate to ensure the interconnection and interoperability of their national information systems, in order that the requisite information on the ship or its cargo can be exchanged electronically at any time.

Each EU country must designate the competent authorities, port authorities and coastal stations to which the notifications required by the directive are to be made.

Cooperation must be arranged between the Commission and the EU countries with a view to the future development of the European monitoring, control and information system for maritime traffic. It will cover the development of telematic links between coastal stations and port authorities, and extension of the coverage of the European monitoring system. Efforts must also be made to improve the management of shipping information, which is one of the tasks of the European Maritime Safety Agency.

To ensure the directive is being implemented satisfactorily, EU countries must make regular checks on the operation of their information systems and must introduce a system of financial penalties to act as a deterrent against failure to comply with the directive’s requirements regarding notification and the carrying of equipment.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for implementation in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2002/59/EC

5.8.2002

5.2.2004

OJ L 49 of 24.2.2011

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2011/15/EU

16.3.2011

16.3.2012

OJ L 49 of 24.2.2011

Maritime safety: European Maritime Safety Agency

Maritime safety: European Maritime Safety Agency

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime safety: European Maritime Safety Agency

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Bodies and objectives

Maritime safety: European Maritime Safety Agency

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 1406/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 June 2002 establishing a European Maritime Safety Agency [See amending acts].

Summary

This regulation establishes a European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) which provides European Union (EU) countries and the Commission with technical and scientific assistance to ensure the proper application of EU legislation in the field of maritime safety, monitor its implementation and evaluate its effectiveness.

The EMSA is responsible for:

  • assisting the Commission in updating, developing and effectively implementing EU legislation in the field of maritime safety and maritime security, the prevention of pollution and response to pollution caused by ships;
  • working with the EU countries to organise, where appropriate, relevant training activities and provide them with technical assistance in implementing EU legislation;
  • providing the Commission and the EU countries with objective, reliable and comparable information and data on maritime safety through the collection, recording and evaluation of technical data in the fields of maritime safety, maritime traffic and marine pollution by means of the systematic exploitation of existing databases and, where appropriate, the development of additional databases;
  • assisting the Commission in the publication, every six months, of information relating to ships that have been refused access to EU ports, and assisting the EU countries in their activities to improve the identification and pursuit of ships making unlawful discharges;
  • undertaking tasks relating to the surveillance of navigation and maritime traffic pursuant to Directive 2002/59/EC in order to facilitate cooperation between the EU countries and the Commission in this field;
  • developing a common methodology for investigating maritime accidents in cooperation with the Commission and the EU countries;
  • providing countries applying for EU accession with technical support in implementing EU legislation in the field of maritime safety, including the organisation of appropriate training activities.

The EMSA is an EU body and has legal personality. At the request of the Commission, and with the agreement of the EU countries concerned, the EMSA may decide to establish the regional centres needed to carry out tasks relating to the monitoring of navigation and maritime traffic and, in particular, to ensure optimum traffic conditions in sensitive areas. The EMSA is represented by its Executive Director.

The EMSA’s staff consists of EU officials and EU countries’ civil servants temporarily assigned or seconded to the EMSA, and other servants recruited by the EMSA.

The EMSA’s Administrative Board is made up of one representative from each EU country, four representatives from the Commission and four professionals from the sectors most concerned. The latter are appointed by the Commission and do not have the right to vote. The term of office is five years and is renewable once.

The Executive Director of the EMSA is completely independent in the performance of his/her duties, without prejudice to the respective competencies of the Commission and the Administrative Board. He/she acts as EMSA manager and, to this end, is responsible for preparing and implementing the budget and work programme and for all matters relating to staff. The Executive Director of the EMSA is appointed by the Administrative Board for a term of five years, renewable once.

The EMSA’s budget consists, for the most part, of a contribution from the EU and from any non-EU country which participates in the work, and, secondly, of charges for publications, training and any other service provided by the EMSA. Financial control is ensured by the Financial Controller of the Commission.

Within five years of the date on which the EMSA takes up its responsibilities, the Administrative Board is to commission an independent external evaluation of the implementation of the regulation.

Non-EU countries wishing to participate in the EMSA must adopt and apply EU law in all fields of competence of the EMSA.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1406/2002

25.8.2002

OJ L 208, 5.8.2002

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1644/2003

1.10.2003

OJ L 245, 29.9.2003

Regulation (EC) No 724/2004

19.5.2004

OJ L 129, 29.4.2004

Regulation (EC) No 2038/2006

31.12.2006

OJ L 394, 30.12.2006

The successive amendments and corrections made to Regulation (EC) No 1406/2002 have been incorporated into the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purposes only.

Related Acts

Directive 2009/16/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2009 on port State control [Official Journal L 131 of 28.5.2009].

Directive 2005/35/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 September 2005 on ship-source pollution and on the introduction of penalties, including criminal penalties, for pollution offences [Official Journal L 255 of 30.9.2005].

Directive 2002/59/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 June 2002 establishing a Community vessel traffic monitoring and information system and repealing Council Directive 93/75/EEC [Official Journal L 208 of 5.8.2002].

Ship-source pollution and criminal penalties

Ship-source pollution and criminal penalties

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Ship-source pollution and criminal penalties

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Waterborne transport

Ship-source pollution and criminal penalties

Acts

Directive 2005/35/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 7 September 2005 on ship-source pollution and on the introduction of penalties, particularly criminal penalties, for infringements.

Summary

The current legislation states that ship-source polluting discharges constitute in principle a criminal offence and according to the Directive this relates to discharges of oil or other noxious substances from vessels. Minor discharges shall not automatically be considered as offences, except where their repetition leads to a deterioration in the quality of the water, including in the case of repeated discharges.

The persons responsible for discharging polluting substances may be subject to criminal penalties, if they have acted with intent, recklessly * or with serious negligence. The act of inciting, aiding and abetting a person to discharge a polluting substance may also lead to criminal penalties.

The Directive applies to all types of vessels, irrespective of their flag. Polluting discharges are forbidden in:

  • the internal waters, including ports, of a European Union (EU) country;
  • the territorial waters of an EU country;
  • straits used for international navigation subject to the regime of transit passage, as laid down in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea;
  • the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of an EU country;
  • the high seas.

Exceptions

This regime does not apply to discharges from warships or other ships owned or operated by a State and used only on government non-commercial service.

Exceptions to the ban on discharges of polluting substances may be applied where human safety or that of the ship is in danger.

Legal persons

Legal persons under private law * may be subject to criminal penalties if a natural person has committed a criminal offence for their benefit. This natural person may have acted either individually or as part of an organ of the legal person. They must have a leading position within the structure of the legal person.

The legal person is also responsible for offences committed by a natural person through oversight, specifically through a lack of supervision or control.

The liability of a legal person shall not exclude criminal proceedings against the natural persons involved.

Applying penalties

The national authorities shall ensure that effective, proportionate and dissuasive penalties are applied, including for minor offences. They shall cooperate when a vessel is found guilty of illegal discharging in their area of responsibility before the vessels calls at the port of another EU country.

Background

The sinking of the Prestige in November 2002 and of the Erika in December 1999 highlighted the need to tighten the net in relation to ship-source pollution. However, accidents are not the main source of pollution: most of it is the result of deliberate discharges (tank-cleaning operations and waste oil disposal).

These rules incorporate into Community law the 1973 International Convention on the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and its 1978 Protocol (Marpol Convention 73/78). This will make it possible to harmonise application of the provisions of this convention.

These two Conventions establish a two-tier liability system built upon:

  • (limited) strict liability for the ship owner;
  • a collectively financed fund which provides supplementary compensation to victims of oil pollution damage who have not obtained full compensation.
Key terms
  • Reckless action: action taken with the knowledge that it is likely to result in damage.
  • Legal persons under private law: all legal entities, such as undertakings, with the exception of States, public bodies and international public organisations.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2005/35/EC

30.9.2005

1.3.2007

OJ L 255 of 30.9.2005

Directive 2009/123/EC

16.11.2009

16.11.2010

OJ L 280 of 27.10.2009

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 2005/35/CE have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purpose only.

Related Acts


Regulation (EC) No 1406/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 June 2002 establishing a European Maritime Safety Agency.


Directive 2000/59/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 November 2000 on port reception facilities for ship-generated waste and cargo residues [OJ L 332, 28.12.2000].