Tag Archives: LA

Landfill of waste

Landfill of waste

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Landfill of waste

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Tackling climate change

Landfill of waste

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 1999/31/EC of 26 April 1999 on the landfill of waste [See amending acts].

Summary

The Directive is intended to prevent or reduce the adverse effects of the landfill of waste on the environment.

It defines the different categories of waste (municipal waste, hazardous waste, non-hazardous waste and inert waste) and applies to all landfills, defined as waste disposal sites for the deposit of waste onto or into land. Landfills are divided into three classes:

  • landfills for hazardous waste;
  • landfills for non-hazardous waste;
  • landfills for inert waste.

On the other hand, the Directive does not apply to:

  • the spreading on the soil of sludges (including sewage sludges and sludges resulting from dredging operations);
  • the use in landfills of inert waste for redevelopment or restoration work;
  • the deposit of unpolluted soil or of non-hazardous inert waste resulting from prospecting and extraction, treatment and storage of mineral resources as well as from the operation of quarries;
  • the deposit of non-hazardous dredging sludges alongside small waterways from which they have been dredged and of non-hazardous sludges in surface water, including the bed and its subsoil.

A standard waste acceptance procedure is laid down so as to avoid any risks:

  • waste must be treated before being landfilled;
  • hazardous waste within the meaning of the Directive must be assigned to a hazardous waste landfill;
  • landfills for non-hazardous waste must be used for municipal waste and for non-hazardous waste;
  • landfill sites for inert waste must be used only for inert waste.

The following wastes may not be accepted in a landfill:

  • liquid waste;
  • flammable waste;
  • explosive or oxidising waste;
  • hospital and other clinical waste which is infectious;
  • used tyres, with certain exceptions;
  • any other type of waste which does not meet the acceptance criteria laid down in Annex II.

The Directive sets up a system of operating permits for landfill sites. Applications for permits must contain the following information:

  • the identity of the applicant and, in some cases, of the operator;
  • a description of the types and total quantity of waste to be deposited;
  • the capacity of the disposal site;
  • a description of the site;
  • the proposed methods for pollution prevention and abatement;
  • the proposed operation, monitoring and control plan;
  • the plan for closure and aftercare procedures;
  • the applicant’s financial security;
  • an impact assessment study, where required under Council Directive 85/337/EEC on the assessment of the effects of certain public and private projects on the environment.

Member States must ensure that existing landfill sites may not continue to operate unless they comply with the provisions of the Directive as soon as possible.

Member States must report to the Commission every three years on the implementation of the Directive.

On the basis of these reports, the Commission must publish a Community report on the implementation of the Directive;

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 1999/31/EC

16.07.1999

16.07.2001

OJ L 182 of 16.07.1999

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003

20.11.2003

OJ L 284 of 31.10.2003

Regulation (EC) No 1137/2008

11.12.2008

OJ L 311 of 21.11.2008

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 1999/31/EC have been incorporated in the original text. This consolidated version  is of documentary value only.

Related Acts


Information on islands and isolated settlements excluded by Member States under Article 3(4) of the Landfill Directive [Official Journal C 316 of 13 December 2005].

Council Decision 2003/33/EC of 19 December 2002 establishing criteria and procedures for the acceptance of waste at landfills pursuant to Article 16 of and Annex II to Directive 1999/31/EC [Official Journal L 11 of 16.01.2003].

Commission Decision 2000/738/EC of 17 November 2000 concerning a questionnaire for Member States’ reports on the implementation of Directive 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste [Official Journal L 298 of 25.11.2000].

Reports

Report from the Commission of 20 November 2009 on implementation of the community waste legislation Directive 2006/12/EC on waste, Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste, Directive 75/439/EEC on waste oils, Directive 86/278/EEC on sewage sludge, Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste, Directive 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste and Directive 2002/96/EC on waste electrical and electronic equipment for the period 2004-2006 [COM(2009) 633 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The implementation of the Directive on the landfill of waste remains highly unsatisfactory and considerable efforts need to be undertaken to improve it. Ten years after the adoption of the Directive, not all Member States report having transposed and implemented all its provisions. There are still a large number of illegal landfills, which do not have the authorisations required by EU legislation on waste. A vast majority of Member States did not meet the deadline of 16 July 2009 to ensure that all sub-standard landfills (unless specifically derogated) that existed before the introduction of the Directive complied with its requirements. Only nine Member States report having met the 2006 targets for the diversion of biodegradable municipal waste from landfills and capture of landfill gas appears insufficient.
In 2009, thirteen non-conformity cases and eleven bad application cases were pending against Member States. In response to these systemic failures of Member States to properly implement the EU waste legislation, the Commission has taken a strategic approach.

Report from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament on implementation of the Community waste legislation: Directive 75/442/EEC, Directive 91/689/EEC on hazardous waste, Directive 75/439/EEC on waste oils, Directive 86/278/EEC on sewage sludge, Directive 94/62/EC on packaging and packaging waste and Directive 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste for the period 2001-2003 [COM(2006) 406 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Some Member States have made use of the possibility of excluding certain wastes or landfills from some provisions of the Directive (for example remote sites and underground storage). In a certain number of countries, a very high number of landfills for non-hazardous waste and for inert waste will have to be re-equipped or closed by 2009 to conform to the Directive. Most Member States have defined some criteria for wastes acceptable in landfills and prepared national strategies for reducing biodegradable waste going to landfills. The Commission has initiated infringement cases because of the numerous unauthorised landfills for failing to ensure that all operators of existing landfills had presented their conditioning plans by 16 July 2002.

Report from the Commission of 30 March 2005 on the national strategies for the reduction of biodegradable waste going to landfills pursuant to Article 5(1) of Directive 1999/31/EC on the landfill of waste [COM(2005) 105 – not published in the Official Journal].
By January 2004 the Commission had received the national strategies from twelve Member States (Ireland and Spain did not submit their strategies and Finland submitted its strategy too late to be included in the report). Belgium and the United Kingdom presented their strategies on a regional basis. The ten new Member States were also to submit their strategies after accession.
The report points out that all the strategies promote composting, recycling of paper and energy recovery. Most strategies stress the importance of using source segregated organic waste to obtain good quality compost. The level of detail of the strategies and the measures to achieve the targets vary considerably. Some Member States have chosen legally binding measures, while others have chosen voluntary measures and incentives. It is not possible to tell with any certainty from studying the strategies whether the reduction objectives will be met in those Member States which have not yet done so; however it seems that further effort must be made for the objectives to be achieved.

Labour Force Sample Survey

Labour Force Sample Survey

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Labour Force Sample Survey

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Employment and social policy > Social and employment situation in europe

Labour Force Sample Survey

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 577/98 of 9 March 1998 on the organisation of a labour force sample survey in the Community [See amending acts].

Summary

The development of European employment policy is based on comparable statistical information obtained in the Member States.

Each year European Union (EU) Member States conduct sample surveys of the labour forces in their population and the levels of under-employment *. The results of the statistical surveys are sent to the European Commission (Eurostat).

Data collection

The surveys are carried out using a sample of private households * or of persons residing in the country at the time of the survey. If possible, the survey is supplemented by information on persons living in collective households *.

Other collection means may be used if they produce information of an equivalent quality (such as the use of administrative records).

The Member States may make it compulsory to reply to the survey.

Representativeness of the information

Margins of error are planned in for the calculation of statistical data in Member States with a population of more than one million inhabitants. In addition, the weighting factors of results are calculated taking into account the characteristics of the population (age, sex, region, etc.).

Lastly, the methods of statistical imputation may be applied in cases where non-response to certain questions results in missing data.

Elements of the survey

Member States must provide Eurostat with whatever information is required concerning the organisation of the survey and its methodology (criteria adopted for the design and size of the sample). This information shall not include any direct identifiers of the person surveyed.

The survey must relate, in particular, to the following characteristics:

  • the characteristics of the person surveyed (sex, year of birth, marital status, etc.);
  • their principal and/or secondary activity (professional status, salary, country of employment, permanence of employment and the reasons, etc.);
  • their working time and their atypical hours of work;
  • their possible situation of underemployment;
  • their search for employment (type of employment sought, duration of search, method, etc.);
  • their possibilities for education and training;
  • their previous work experience;
  • their situation one year before the survey.

The Commission may decide to collect information on supplementary aspects not provided for in this Regulation.

Context

Regulation 577/98 repeals Regulation (EEC) No 3711/91.

Key terms used in the act
  • Private household: persons living in the same dwelling, namely family members, but also specifically long-term guests, lodgers and household staff.
  • Collective household: persons living in a non-institutional collective dwelling (such as boarding schools, dormitories of educational establishments, etc.) occupied by more than five persons who do not share household expenses.
  • Underemployment: the situation of persons working involuntarily less than the normal working time (for example, part-time workers) and those who are able to increase their hours of work, such as by taking on an additional job.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 577/98

15.3.1998

15.3.1998

L 77, 14.3.1998

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1991/2002

10.11.2002

10.11.2002

OJ L 308, 9.11.2002

Regulation (EC) No 2104/2002

19.12.2002

19.12.2002

OJ L 324, 29.11.2002

Regulation (EC) No 2257/2003

12.01.2004

12.01.2004

OJ L 336, 23.12.2003

Regulation (EC) No 1372/2007

23.12.2007

OJ L 315, 3.12.2007

Regulation (EC) No 596/2009

18.6.2009

7.8.2009

OJ L 188, 18.7.2009

The successive amendments and corrections to Regulation (EC) No 577/98 have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis of documentary value only.

Related Acts

Methods of statistical calculations

Commission Regulation (EC) No 377/2008 of 25 April 2008 implementing Council Regulation (EC) No 577/98 on the organisation of a labour force sample survey in the Community as regards the codification to be used for data transmission from 2009 onwards, the use of a sub-sample for the collection of data on structural variables and the definition of the reference quarters (Text with EEA relevance).

Land policy in developing countries

Land policy in developing countries

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Land policy in developing countries

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Development > Sectoral development policies

Land policy in developing countries

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 19 October 2004 – EU Guidelines to support land policy design and reform processes in developing countries [COM(2004) 686 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The European Union (EU) supports land policy reforms in developing countries. To this end, the Commission provides guidelines to target the action of the Commission and EU Member States in this area.

Land reforms give rise to public policies on the distribution and use of agricultural land. Such reforms have implications in several areas, such as the fight against poverty, environmental management, market regulation, good governance, and democracy. They should be based on national consensus, and supported by rural organisations.

Land policy support

The EU focuses on certain aspects of land reform, in order to:

  • guarantee the security of land rights, through effective institutions and by taking into account both traditional and informal land access schemes;
  • analyse existing rules and practices, as well as land conflicts and modes of transfer;
  • establish innovative land access schemes, beyond the allocation of land rights, and by taking into account village, family or individual rights;
  • support the reform of land administrations, in particular to implement simple and transparent procedures, opportunities for appeal in the event of dispute, and actions to increase public awareness;
  • promote land rental markets, which are more accessible to the poor and less susceptible to the risks associated with farming. Such measures are subject to the existence of appropriate contractual rights.

Development assistance

Official Development Assistance allocated by the European Union and its Member States can be used to support public debate, and the preparation and implementation of reforms. It should also facilitate the implementation of thematic projects (research, environment, social development, etc), and reform evaluation actions.

National reform processes should include civil society and minority groups in a participatory process. Furthermore, reforms should focus primarily on areas where inequality persists.

The EU should also participate in the creation of partnerships, in order to prioritise common approaches, the sharing of experience, as well as facilitating coordination with international donors.

Finally, to be effective, European assistance should comply with certain principles:

  • providing solutions that are specific to the local social and institutional context;
  • establishing partnerships with the competent public authorities and stakeholders from civil society;
  • conducting regular political dialogue and encouraging coordination with the competent authorities;
  • supporting long-term processes;
  • supporting equality between men and women concerning the control over and use of land resources;
  • conducting public information and awareness-raising campaigns;
  • supporting research;
  • protecting the most deprived members of the population, and in particular indigenous peoples.

Latvia – Environment

Latvia – Environment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Environment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Environment

Short-term priorities:

  • continued transposition of framework legislation;
  • establishment of detailed approximation programmes and implementation strategies related to individual acts;
  • planning and initial implementation of these programmes and strategies.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been met.

Latvia has made progress in transposing horizontal legislation, while continuing to align its air quality, water quality, waste management and industrial pollution legislation. Further efforts are nonetheless required. Greater emphasis is required on implementing and enforcing new standards.

Assessment (November 2000)

The legislation complies with the acquis concerning the environment impact assessment. Good progress has been made in the alignment of legislation on nature protection, GMOs, air quality and nuclear safety. Progress still has to be made in the areas of water quality, waste management, industrial pollution control, noise pollution and chemical products.

Assessment (November 2001)

The alignment of legislation has continued, particularly in the following sectors: environmental impact assessment, waste management, pollution, nature protection and nuclear safety. Several bodies have been set up: the Latvian Environment Agency, the GMO Monitoring Council, the Packaging Management Council and the Radiation Safety Centre.

Assessment (October 2002)

Good progress has been made towards completing the transposition of the acquis, particularly in the areas of environmental information, waste management and chemicals.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • development of monitoring and implementation control structures and capacities;
  • on-going planning and implementation of approximation programmes related to individual legal acts;
  • particular emphasis on drinking water quality, waste water and waste;
  • environmental protection requirements and the need for sustainable development must be integrated into the definition and implementation of national sectoral policies.

Assessment (October 1999)

The National Environmental Policy Plan and the related Action Programme address the issue of integration of the environment into other sectors. No progress has been recorded in the other areas.

Assessment (November 2000)

There has been no progress in this area.

Assessment (November 2001)

The transposition of Community legislation must continue in all sectors, together with work to ensure its effective application. Special efforts are required in the fields of waste management, water quality and chemical products.

Assessment (October 2002)

Implementation of the waste management acquis has continued, particularly as regards packaging, packaging waste and hazardous waste. The environmental protection control system has been strengthened. Implementation has begun of the acquis relating to urban wastewater and drinking water. Administrative capacity has been stepped up, notably through the training of environmental inspectors, though further efforts are required, particularly at regional and local level. The Nature Protection Board has become operational, but needs to be reinforced. The environment needs to be further integrated into other policies.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999)506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Latvia – Economic policy

Latvia – Economic policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Economic policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Economic policy

Short-term priorities:

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • regular review of the joint assessment of economic policy priorities within the Europe Agreement framework, focusing on satisfying the Copenhagen criteria for membership of the Union and the acquis in the area of economic and monetary policy (coordination of economic policies, submission of convergence programmes, avoidance of excessive deficits);
  • while Latvia is not expected to adopt the euro immediately on accession, it is expected to pursue policies which aim to achieve real convergence in accordance with the Union’s objectives of economic and social cohesion, as well as nominal convergence compatible with the ultimate goal of adoption of the euro.

Assessment (October 1999)

Latvian legislation has been amended to comply with the requirements of the European Union with a view to its participation in economic and monetary union.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made with this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

No progress has been made with this priority.

Assessment (October 2002)

A large number of objectives have already been achieved on the basis of previous accession partnerships. The 2002 partnership report therefore focuses on very specific outstanding issues and does not provide an overview of Latvia’s preparedness for economic and monetary union.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97)2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98)703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999)506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Latvia – Agriculture

Latvia – Agriculture

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Agriculture

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Agriculture

Short-term priorities

Agriculture

  • continuation of the alignment and improvement of inspection procedures in the veterinary and plant health sector;
  • modernisation of meat and dairy processing factories in order to meet European Union public health and hygiene standards.

Assessment (November 2000)

Progress has been made on the alignment of legislation on animal welfare, veterinary medicine, the identification and registration of animals, as well as in the plant health sector and on animal feed. The equipment of border posts is continuing. Hygiene standards have been adopted for some products including meat and milk. Factories are slow in complying with European health requirements.

Assessment (November 2001)

Progress has been made on plant health and veterinary legislation and on border controls. Although some provisions have been adopted, there is still no action plan for food processing plants.

Assessment (October 2002)

Latvia has continued its efforts in the veterinary sector by setting up a food and veterinary service and tightening up veterinary and food safety controls.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

Agriculture

  • alignment with the agricultural “acquis” (especially in veterinary and plant health matters and, in particular, on external border controls);
  • consolidation of land ownership patterns and development of a rural policy;
  • development of the capacity to implement the common agricultural policy, particularly as regards administrative structures and the basic management mechanisms intended to monitor agricultural markets and to implement structural and rural development measures;
  • adoption and implementation of veterinary and plant health requirements;
  • upgrading of some food processing establishments and some testing and diagnostic facilities;
  • restructuring of the agri-food sector.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made on these priorities.

Assessment (November 2001)

There has been progress on agricultural policy management mechanisms and on food hygiene following the adoption of a strategy in April 2000. Efforts have continued in the veterinary and plant health sectors.

Assessment (October 2002)

Latvia has set up a veterinary and food office and the Sapard agency has been approved.
Efforts will have to be made to align with the Community acquis and strengthen the institutional capacity needed to implement the common agricultural policy.

Fisheries

A satellite monitoring system has been introduced, a computerised fishing fleet register has been established and a detailed plan for implementing intervention mechanisms has been drawn up. However, efforts are still needed on inspection and control.

Assessment (October 2002)

Efforts to complete alignment have continued. Administrative capacity must be increased and certain areas such as structural policy and market policy improved.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Latvia – Transport

Latvia – Transport

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Transport

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Transport

Short-term priorities:

  • alignments of legislation on maritime safety.

Assessment (November (2000)

Some provisions on maritime safety have been adopted. A restructuring of the maritime administration has begun in order to improve control procedures for ports and flags. A register for ships flying the Latvian flag is being drawn up.

Assessment (November 2001)

No new legislation on maritime safety has been adopted in the last year. Nevertheless, Latvia has reinforced its maritime administrative structures by carrying out an internal restructuring.

Assessment (October 2002)

Latvia has pursued the restructuring of its maritime administration and training. Regarding Flag State performance, progress has been made inasmuch as the Port State controls and detention rates of Latvian ships have improved, but the safety record needs to be raised significantly to reach EU level.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • further efforts on alignment to acquis, particularly on road freight transport (technical rules and taxation), shipping (safety) and rail transport;
  • mobilisation of necessary investment for transport infrastructure (in particular the extension of trans-European networks).

Assessment (October 1999)

Latvia has continued to align its legislation on the acquis and to invest in transport infrastructure. Progress was particularly apparent on the railways.

Assessment (November 2000)

Regulations on the transport of dangerous goods by road have been adopted. An independent authority investigating civil aviation accidents was set up in January 2000.

Assessment (November 2001)

Latvia has adopted a number of legislative acts concerning weights and dimensions, type-approval, vehicle registration, driver qualification and the transport of dangerous goods. Certain Community provisions have yet to be transposed however.
A law on rail transport entered into force in January 2001.
Latvia has harmonised a large part of its legislation in the field of air transport.
With regard to maritime transport, the first results of ongoing efforts to improve maritime safety are now being seen.

Assessment (October 2002)

Legislative alignment has continued in road transport, but no new legislation has been adopted in relation to either railway or maritime transport. With regard to air transport, the computerised reservation system requirements have been transposed. Regarding rail transport, a passenger carriage operator has been established.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001)700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Latvia – Employment and social affairs

Latvia – Employment and social affairs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Employment and social affairs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Employment and social affairs

Short-term priorities:

  • completion of the national employment strategy;
  • support for the social partners’ capacity-building efforts in developing and implementing the acquis, notably through bilateral social dialogue;
  • adoption of a new labour code (i.e. collective redundancies, equal treatment and working conditions).

Assessment (November 2000)

The national employment plan for the year 2000 was adopted in February 2000. Examination of the employment situation has already begun. Tripartite social dialogue is well established in Latvia, but no progress has been seen in bipartisanship. The new labour code is in the process of being approved.

Assessment (October 2002)

No particular action was taken with regard to social dialogue.
Progress was made in 2002 in terms of the national employment strategy.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • development of labour market policies and joint review of these policies as preparation for participation in Union coordination;
  • alignment of labour law and occupational hygiene and safety legislation and development of implementation structures, in particular early adoption of the framework directive on health and safety at work;
  • establishment of equal opportunities between women and men;
  • further development of active, autonomous social dialogue;
  • further development of social protection;
  • steps to bring public health standards into line with Union norms.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (October 2002)

Although the acquis on equal treatment for women and men has yet to be implemented, the 2002 Report notes that progress has been made in this area.
The bipartite social dialogue is still lagging behind.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 706 final – SEC(2002) 1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Latvia – Regional Policy

Latvia – Regional Policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Regional Policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Regional Policy

Short-term priorities:

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priority:

  • introduction of the legal, budgetary and administrative framework of a national policy to deal with regional disparities with an integrated approach, in order to participate in structural programmes of the European Union.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2001)

The national development plan is being drawn up. The Ministry of Finance will be responsible in future for managing the Structural Funds and planning how they are to be used as well as for coordinating national budgetary policy. Progress on legislative, institutional, structural and administrative matters is still limited. Priority should be given to adopting the legal basis for future participation in the Structural Funds.

Assessment (October 2002)

Latvia has made important progress in preparing for the implementation of the economic and social cohesion policy. As regards territorial organisation, Latvia reached an agreement with Eurostat on the NUTS classification (Nomenclature of Territorial Statistical Units): the whole country corresponds to NUTS I and NUTS II levels and is divided into five planning regions at NUTS III level. Latvia adopted the Regional Development Law in March 2002, laying down the general system for regional policy and the Spatial Planning Law in May 2002. The main institutions to be involved in managing the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund were designated in February 2002: the Ministry of Finance and the State Treasury will become the managing and paying authorities, respectively for the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund. The Ministry of Finance has started its reorganisation by: merging several institutions under its authority, creating new departments and recruiting additional staff. As regards programming, in January 2002, Latvia submitted the National Development Plan (2002-2006) to the Commission, which will serve as the basis for the draft Single Programming Document (SPD). The Latvian SPD will include 6 priorities: one for each Fund (EAGGF, FIFG, ESF) and two for ERDF (business development and infrastructure) with an additional priority for Technical Assistance. In order to promote co-operation among the public administrative levels and to discuss the elaboration of the Plan, two partnership seminars were organised in March and April 2002 with representatives of non-governmental organisations and planning regions. Furthermore, Latvia adopted guidelines on management, monitoring, evaluation and control in March 2002. According to these guidelines, the Ministry of Finance is responsible for the establishment of monitoring and evaluation systems and the overall co-ordination of the internal audit units of all public institutions. The State Audit Office will perform the external financial control. Concerning statistics, a computerised data exchange system is just being created.

Latvia has closed negotiations on the Regional Policy chapter without requesting any transitional arrangements. Now the country has to make further efforts in order to strengthen administrative capacity and develop inter-ministerial co-ordination and partnership. As regards programming, the key focus should be on preparing the SPD and its ex-ante evaluation. Although the bodies in charge of implementing the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund have been appointed, the allocation of tasks and the implementing legislation are still to be completed. Latvia should pay particular attention to guaranteeing that project selection and decision-making will be managed within a framework that ensures the transparency, efficiency and reliability of programmes. Generally, all systems and procedures for effective monitoring, financial management and control should be reinforced.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Latvia – Political Criteria

Latvia – Political Criteria

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Latvia – Political Criteria

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Latvia

Latvia – Political Criteria

Short-term priorities:

  • to adopt measures facilitating the naturalisation process with a view to integrating non-citizens (including stateless children);
  • to improve Latvian language teaching for non-Latvian speakers.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been achieved in part.
Following the liberalisation of the citizenship law in autumn 1998, there was an increase in the number of naturalisation applications, although applications from stateless children are still low. The Latvian Language Programme has been continued successfully in spite of a shortage of language teachers. The government will have to earmark more funds for language teaching in the coming years.

Assessment (November 2000)

The language law is compatible with international standards and the Europe Agreement. The Latvian Language Training Programme has been implemented, but the government will earmark more funds for it in the future. The document on “The Integration of Society in Latvia” has been adopted but not yet put into effect.

Assessment (November 2001)

The regulations concerning the implementation of the language law have been amended to clarify the relationship between knowledge of the language and the profession. Latvia only has to observe this law in cases of legitimate general interest, taking account of the principle of proportionality. Direct public funding for the language training programme has been introduced. The priority relating to the Latvian language has to a large extent been satisfied.

Assessment (October 2002)

Significant progress has been made in reforming the public administration, which is becoming professional and stable. Efforts to ensure minimum staffing levels, the training of officials and adequate financial resources must continue. Although progress has been made as regards the judicial system, the legal framework has yet to be completed, including the adoption of a new Law on Criminal Procedure. No progress has been recorded regarding the alleviation of courts, the elimination of the backlog of pending court cases and the enforcement of decisions. Advances have been made in the fight against corruption as well as in the fields of human rights, the protection of minorities and the integration of non-citizens into Latvian society. Support to facilitate the integration process has been stepped up through language training and information campaigns.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priority:

  • accelerated integration of non-citizens by simplifying the naturalisation process (including for stateless children).

Assessment (October 1999)

Naturalisation procedures have been simplified in line with the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) recommendations (by reducing the number of questions in the history test and reducing fees for several categories of applicant). Additional funds were made available in the spring of 1999 to reinforce the capacity of the Naturalisation Board and its branches to receive and process the increasing number of applications.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made on this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

The programme on the integration of society in Latvia has been extended through new proposals, and a foundation, responsible for selecting and financing projects, has been created. There is still a lack of language teachers and the government must set aside additional funds to resolve this problem, the priority having been partially satisfied.

Assessment (October 2002)

There has been no progress as regards the naturalisation process. Sufficient funding must be made available to encourage better integration and language training.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/263/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/854/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2004 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 703 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 506 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM (2000) 706 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1749
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002)700 final – SEC(2002)1405
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1203
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.