Tag Archives: Humanisation of work

Promoting decent work for all

Promoting decent work for all

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Promoting decent work for all

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Employment and social policy > Social inclusion and the fight against poverty

Promoting decent work for all


Another Normative about Promoting decent work for all

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Employment and social policy > Employment and social policy: international dimension and enlargement

Promoting decent work for all

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 24 May 2006 – Promoting decent work for all – the EU contribution to the implementation of the decent work agenda in the world [COM(2006) 249 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Decent working conditions contribute to development, good governance and economic performance. For many emerging and developing countries, globalisation and economic growth do not result in improvements in social conditions or respect for human rights or a reduction in poverty.

This Communication proposes political guidelines to strengthen the EU contribution to the decent work agenda of the International Labour Organisation (ILO). It champions a global approach in order to act both on the defence of fundamental social rights and on the conditions of economic and social development. This strategy should be adapted to the situation of each country.

Acting through external policies

Enlargement policy and the pre-accession strategy make it possible to strengthen:

  • trade union freedom, collective bargaining and the capacity of trade unions;
  • labour administration, especially labour inspectorates and social protection;
  • health and safety at work.

Neighbourhood policy is a gradual process which involves in particular:

  • commitments in the area of fundamental social rights;
  • regular political dialogue with the EU;
  • the integration of decent work in the cooperation instruments and cooperation between partner countries and EU agencies.

The EU promotes decent work and social dialogue as part of its regional and bilateral relations. These issues have been integrated into the cooperation agreements with Latin America, the African, Caribbean and Pacific countries (ACP) and India. They are part of political discussions with Asian countries, especially the Asia-Europe discussions (ASEM).

In the context of development cooperation, the European Consensus on Development identifies decent work as a priority. The European programmes support the following in particular:

  • integrating decent work into development strategies and strategies to combat poverty;
  • the participation of the social partners and civil society;
  • improving the capacity of the authorities and civil society;
  • budgetary support and social adjustment for countries involved in trade liberalisation;
  • development of small and medium-sized enterprises;
  • cooperation of partners and the international and regional organisations concerned.

European external trade policy contributes to sustainable development. The new Generalised System of Preferences (GSP) enables the EU to promote fundamental social rights. Future bilateral or multilateral trade negotiations should take account of:

  • the GSP+ for good governance and sustainable development;
  • the assessment of the impact of opening trade;
  • the mobilisation of European external aid policies and instruments;
  • the interaction between trade, social rights and employment;
  • the promotion of cooperation between the World Trade Organisation (WTO), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) and the ILO.

International governance

International organisations and international financial institutions should take account of existing connections between decent work and economic migration, and of the level of trade, economic growth and investment.

Corporate social responsibility (CSR)

Enterprises have a role which complements legislation, collective bargaining and control of working conditions. The drafting of codes of conduct and CSR instruments should be encouraged. They should be based on standards recognised at international level.

Related Acts

Commission working document – Report on the EU contribution to the promotion of decent work in the world [SEC(2008) 2184 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
Since 2006, European institutions have mobilised on the issue of decent work and progress has been made at global level. In particular, the processes of ratification and development of ILO conventions have made progress. A number of challenges lie ahead:

  • recognition of decent work as a priority of international development and poverty reduction objectives;
  • labour market transition to a low carbon economy;
  • applying the ILO conventions and improving labour market governance, despite the importance of the informal economy in most of the emerging or developing countries.

Communication from the Commission to the European Council – Strategic report on the renewed Lisbon strategy for growth and jobs: launching the new cycle (2008-2010) – Keeping up the pace of change [COM(2007) 803 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Joint declaration by the Council and the representatives of the governments of the Member States meeting within the Council, the European Parliament and the Commission on the development policy of the European Union entitled “The European Consensus on Development [Official Journal C 46 of 24.2.2006].

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – The Social Dimension of Globalisation – The EU’s policy contribution on extending the benefits to all [COM(2004) 383 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

EUROPEAN SOCIAL AGENDA

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – Renewed social agenda: Opportunities, access and solidarity in 21st century Europe [COM(2008) 412 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
Communication from the Commission on the Social Agenda [COM(2005) 33 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Health and safety at work – general rules

Health and safety at work – general rules

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Health and safety at work – general rules

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Employment and social policy > Health hygiene and safety at work

Health and safety at work – general rules

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 89/391/EEC of 12 June 1989 on the introduction of measures to encourage improvements in the safety and health of workers at work [See amending act(s)].

Summary

This Directive establishes base rules on protecting the health and safety of workers *. The measures provided in the Directive aim to eliminate the risk factors for occupational diseases and accidents.

These measures apply to all sectors of activity, both public and private, with the exception of certain specific activities in the public (e.g. army, police, etc.) and civil protection services.

Employers * are obliged to ensure the health and safety workers in every aspect related to the work, including if they enlist external companies or persons. Member States may limit this responsibility in the case of force majeure *.

The employer shall establish means and measures for protecting workers. These involve activities of prevention, information and training workers, particularly to:

  • avoid risks or manage those risks that cannot be avoided;
  • give appropriate instructions to workers by promoting common protective measures;
  • adapt working conditions, equipment and working methods by taking into account developments in techniques.

The protection means and measures should be adapted in cases where the working conditions change. In addition, the employer should take into account the nature of the activities of the company and the capabilities of the workers.

If workers from several companies work in the same work place, the different employers shall cooperate and coordinate their protective measures and risk prevention measures.

In addition, activities of first aid, fire-fighting and the evacuation of workers in serious and immediate danger must be adapted to the nature of the activities and to the size of the company. The employer must inform and train those workers who could be exposed to serious and immediate danger.

The employer shall establish protective and preventative services in their company or establishment, including with regard to activities of first aid and reacting to serious danger. The employer shall therefore appoint one or several trained workers to ensure that the measures are followed or to call the external services.

Monitoring the health of workers is ensured by the measures fixed in accordance with national legislation and practice. Each worker may request a health check at regular intervals.

Groups of people at risk or particularly sensitive people should be protected against dangers which could affect them specifically.

Consulting workers

Employers shall consult workers and their representatives concerning all the issues related to health and safety at work.

Workers’ representatives can suggest that the employer takes particular measures. They can enlist the national competent authorities if the employer fails to fulfil their duty.

Workers’ obligations

Each worker must take care of their own health and security and that of persons affected by their acts or by their omissions at work. In accordance with the training given and the instructions of their employers, in particular workers must:

  • use equipment, tools and substances connected to their activity of work correctly;
  • use personal protective equipment correctly;
  • refrain from disconnecting, changing or removing arbitrarily safety devices fitted;
  • immediately inform the employer of any work situation which represents a serious and immediate danger.

Context

This Framework Directive is supplemented by the sectoral Directives (listed in the Annex), in particular concerning the use of personal protective equipment and manual handling work.

Key terms
  • Worker: any person employed, including trainees and apprentices, but excluding domestic workers;
  • Employer: any natural or legal person who has an employment relationship with a worker and has responsibility for the undertaking and/or establishment;
  • Force majeure: situation where the events due to extraordinary and unforeseeable circumstances outside of the control of the employer, have consequences which could not have been avoided despite all the measures being taken.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 89/391/EEC

19.6.89

31.12.92

OJ 183, 29.6.89

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003

20.11.2003

OJ L 284, 31.10.2003

Directive 2007/30/EC

28.6.2007

31.12.2012

OJ L 165, 27.6.2007

Regulation (EC) No 1137/2008

22.10.2008

11.12.2008

OJ L 311, 21.11.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 89/391/EEC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated version  is of documentary value only.

Provision of health and safety signs at work

Provision of health and safety signs at work

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Provision of health and safety signs at work

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Employment and social policy > Health hygiene and safety at work

Provision of health and safety signs at work

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 92/58/EEC of 24 June 1992 on the minimum requirements for the provision of health and/or safety signs at work (ninth individual Directive within the meaning of Directive 89/391/EEC) [Official Journal L 245 of 26.8.92].

Summary

Directive 92/58/EEC lays down minimum requirements concerning health and safety signs at work *. For example, they relate to: location and identification of containers and pipes, fire-fighting equipment, certain traffic routes, illuminated and acoustic signs, as well as the introduction of appropriate verbal communications * and hand signals *.

This Directive complements the Framework Directive 89/391/EEC on health and safety at work.

The Directive does not apply to signs for the placing on the market of dangerous substances and preparations, products and/or equipment, nor to signs used for regulating road, rail, inland waterway, and sea or air traffic.

Employers’ obligations

Employers must provide safety signs where hazards cannot be avoided or adequately reduced by preventive measures or procedures used in the organisation of work.

Wherever appropriate, signs used for road, rail, inland waterway, sea and air transport can be installed inside companies or undertakings.

Supplementary information

Member States may specify certain exemptions within certain precise limits.

Workers must be informed of the measures to be taken and must be given appropriate training (precise instructions).

Workers must be consulted and allowed to participate on the matters covered by the Directive.

Technical adaptations to the Annexes will be adopted by the Commission, assisted by a committee (Article 17 of Directive 89/391/EEC).

Member States are required to report to the Commission every five years on the practical implementation of the Directive. The Commission is required to report periodically to the European Parliament, the Council and the Economic and Social Committee on the implementation of the Directive.

Context

The Directive repeals Directive 77/576/EC on safety signs in the work place.

Key terms of the Act
  • Safety and health signs: information or instructions about safety and/or health at work by means of a signboard, a colour, an illuminated sign or acoustic or hand signal, or a verbal communication;
  • Verbal communication: a predetermined spoken message communicated by a human or artificial voice;
  • Hand signal: a movement or position of the arms or hands for guiding persons who are carrying out manoeuvres which constitute a hazard or danger.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 92/58/EEC

22.7.1992

24.6.1994

OJ L 245 of 26.8.1992

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2007/30/EC

28.6.2007

31.12.2012

OJ L 165 of 27.6.2007

Related Acts

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the practical implementation of Health and Safety at Work Directives 92/57/EEC (temporary and mobile sites) and 92/58/EEC (safety signs at work) [COM(2008) 698 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The Commission presents a positive report on the implementation of Directive 92/58/EEC. In fact, the majority of the 15 European Union Member States have completed their legislation through the new rules and requirements provided for in this Directive.
Implementation of the Directive has enabled the national systems of workplace safety signs to be streamlined. However, the Commission states that workers are still badly informed about the rules on signs and the Commission encourages companies to strengthen their training activities.

Extractive industries by means of boreholes

Extractive industries by means of boreholes

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Extractive industries by means of boreholes

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Employment and social policy > Health hygiene and safety at work

Extractive industries by means of boreholes

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 92/91/EEC of 3 November 1992 concerning minimum requirements for improving the safety and health protection of workers in the extractive industries (boreholes) (11th individual Directive within the meaning of Article 16(1) of Directive 89/391/EEC) [See amending acts].

Summary

This Directive lays down the minimum requirements for protecting the health and safety of workers in extractive industries by means of boreholes *.

General obligations of the employer:

In applying this Directive, employers are required to:

  • apply safety considerations to workplaces right from the design stage;
  • ensure that there is a supervisor in charge;
  • entrust work involving a special risk only to suitably qualified staff;
  • ensure that safety instructions are comprehensible to all the workers concerned;
  • provide first aid facilities and run safety exercises at regular intervals.

Before the commencement of work, the employer must satisfy himself that a document on safety and health is prepared and brought up to date (in accordance with Articles 6, 9 and 10 of Directive 89/391/EEC). This document must show, in particular, that the risks run by workers at the workplace have been determined and assessed, that appropriate measures have been taken and that the workplace is designed, operated and maintained in line with safety requirements.

Where workers from more than one firm are present at the same workplace, the employer responsible for the workplace must coordinate the health and safety measures applying to these workers and set them out in the document.

This coordination does not affect the liability of individual employers.

The employer must immediately report fatal and serious occupational accidents and dangerous occurrences.

In terms of protection against fire, explosions and health-endangering atmospheres, employers must take preventive measures appropriate to the nature of the operation in order to:

  • avoid, detect and combat the starting and spread of fires and explosions;
  • prevent the occurrence of explosive and/or health-endangering atmospheres.

Employers shall provide and maintain appropriate means of escape and rescue in order to ensure that workers have adequate opportunities for leaving the workplaces promptly and safely in the event of danger.

Employers shall take the requisite measures to provide the necessary warning and other communication systems to enable assistance, escape and rescue operations to be launched immediately if the need arises.

Furthermore, they must inform workers of all measures to be taken concerning safety and health at the workplace.

Every worker must receive or be subject to a health surveillance before they are assigned to duties related to the activities referred to in the Directive and at regular intervals thereafter.

Employers must ensure consultation and participation of workers on the matters covered by the Directive.

Lastly, workplaces used for exploration for and extraction of minerals by means of boreholes must satisfy the minimum health and safety requirements (listed in the Annex).

When workplaces undergo changes, extensions and/or conversions after the date on which this Directive is brought into effect, the employer shall take the measures necessary to ensure that they are in compliance with the minimum requirements laid down in the Annex.

Key terms of the Act
  • Extractive industries (boreholes): all industries engaged in prospecting and extraction activities and in the preparation of extracted materials for sale but not the processing of such extracted materials.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 92/91/EEC

11.11.1992

3.11.1994

OJ L 348 of 28.11.1992

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2007/30/EC

28.6.2007

31.12.2012

OJ L 165 of 27.6.2007

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 92/91/EEC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis for reference only.