Tag Archives: Health legislation

Fight against Newcastle disease

Fight against Newcastle disease

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Fight against Newcastle disease

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal health

Fight against Newcastle disease

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 92/66/EEC of 14 July 1992 introducing Community measures for the control of Newcastle disease [See amending acts].

Summary

This Directive lays down measures for tackling Newcastle disease as soon as its presence is detected in poultry. Similar measures are applied to racing pigeons and other birds kept in captivity.

Once a case of Newcastle disease is suspected, the official veterinarian shall inform the competent authority and implement the measures imposed by them. These measures provide for:

  • the placing of all holdings with suspected outbreaks under surveillance;
  • a record of all categories of poultry kept on the holdings to be made;
  • the isolation of all animals in their living quarters;
  • the banning of transporting poultry;
  • the competent authority to limit the movement of people, vehicles, other animals and materials connected with the poultry, which are liable to be contaminated;
  • the requirement that eggs remain within the holding;
  • the installation of appropriate means of disinfection inside the holding;
  • carrying out an epizootiological inquiry.

The preventative measures shall be withdrawn by the veterinarian once the suspicion of Newcastle disease has been officially ruled out.

Once the presence of Newcastle disease has been officially confirmed, the competent authority shall order a series of measures, including:

  • all poultry on the holding shall be killed;
  • all substances and waste liable to be contaminated shall be destroyed or treated appropriately;
  • meat from poultry from the holding, slaughtered during the presumed incubation period of disease shall be destroyed;
  • eggs laid during the presumed incubation period shall be destroyed;
  • buildings used for housing poultry shall be cleaned and disinfected;
  • no poultry shall be reintroduced to the holding until at least 21 days after completion of cleaning and disinfecting operations;
  • carrying out an epizootiological inquiry.

Some flocks of poultry do not have to be destroyed if the official veterinarian confirms that the animals are healthy and have been completely separated from infected flocks.

After the confirmation of Newcastle disease, the competent authority shall establish a protection zone (based on a minimum radius of three kilometres around the infected holding) and a surveillance zone (based on a minimum radius of 10 kilometres around the infected holding), in which specific measures apply. These measures include, amongst others, the identification of all holdings keeping poultry, periodic visits, clinical examinations and isolating animals. The measures applied in the protection zone shall be withdrawn no less than twenty one days after the cleaning and disinfecting of the holding. In the surveillance zone the measures shall be maintained for thirty days after the cleaning and disinfecting operations.

Each Member State shall designate a national laboratory responsible for coordinating the standards and methods of diagnosis, the use of reagents and the testing of vaccines for Newcastle disease. Each Member State shall then communicate the details of their laboratory to the other Member States and the public. The national laboratories shall work in cooperation with the Community reference laboratory, located in Weybridge (United Kingdom).

Vaccination against Newcastle disease can be carried out in accordance with procedures laid down by Member States. Member States may also provide a vaccination programme for racing pigeons. If the presence of the disease is confirmed, emergency vaccination may also be performed in the zones and for periods as defined by the competent authority.

Each Member State shall draw up a contingency plan which shall determine how Newcastle disease will be managed nationally. The plans shall comply with the series of criteria detailed in this Directive. For example, they must include the establishment of a crisis centre, local disease control centres and detailed information on the staff responsible for the emergency measures.

Commission experts may undertake checks on national establishments.

In order to eradicate Newcastle disease, Member States shall benefit from Community financial assistance according to the conditions defined in Decision 90/424/EEC.

The Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health shall assist the Commission in managing Newcastle disease. They will be involved in designing the checks carried out by the Commission’s experts, amongst other tasks.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 92/66/EEC

25.9.1992

1.10.1993

OJ L 260 of 5.9.1992

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 806/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122 of 16.5.2003

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.1.2010

OJ L 219 of 14.8.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 92/66/EEC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis of documentary value only.

Related Acts

Commission Decision 2007/24/CE of 22 December 2006 approving contingency plans for the control of avian influenza and Newcastle disease [Official Journal L 8 of 13.1.2007].

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 89/556/EEC of 25 September 1989 on animal health conditions governing intra-Community trade in and importation from third countries of embryos of domestic animals of the bovine species [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Directive lays down animal health conditions for trade between Member States in embryos of domestic cattle and imports from third countries.

Intra-Community trade in embryos is limited to those complying with conditions concerning conception, collection, processing, storage and certification. The embryos must be accompanied during transport by a health certificate certifying that they conform to this Directive.

The Directive envisages a system for approving the embryo collection and production teams in the Member States and in third countries. Each team is registered by the competent authority of the country concerned and receives a veterinary registration number.

The list of embryo collection and production teams and their veterinary registration number is regularly updated by the Member States. The latter then communicate the list to the other Member States and the public.

Imports of embryos from third countries are restricted to a list of authorised countries to be drawn up by a procedure provided for by Article 18 with regard to certain criteria (the health of the livestock, information on contagious diseases, prevention and combating animal diseases, the structure of veterinary services, the guarantees provided, etc.).

The Directive provides for safeguard and control measures in the country of collection and the country of destination.

REFERENCES

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 89/556/EEC

29.9.1989

1.1.1991

OJ L 302, 19.10.1989

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 90/425/EEC

26.7.1990

26.9.1990

OJ L 224, 18.8.1990

Directive 93/52/EEC

19.7.1993

31.12.1993

OJ L 175, 19.7.1993

Regulation (EC) No 806/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122, 16.5.2003

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.1.2010

OJ L 219, 14.8.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 89/556/EEC have incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis for reference only.

RELATED ACTS

Commission Decision 2006/168/EC of 4 January 2006 establishing the animal health conditions and the veterinary certification requirements for imports into the Community of bovine embryos and repealing Decision 2005/217/EC [Official Journal L 57 of 28.2.2006].

Animal health rules governing the production, processing, distribution and introduction of products of animal origin for human consumption

Animal health rules governing the production, processing, distribution and introduction of products of animal origin for human consumption

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal health rules governing the production, processing, distribution and introduction of products of animal origin for human consumption

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Animal health rules governing the production, processing, distribution and introduction of products of animal origin for human consumption

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 2002/99/EC of 12 December 2002 laying down the animal health rules governing the production, processing, distribution and introduction of products of animal origin for human consumption.

Summary

This Directive harmonises and strengthens veterinary public health requirements scattered throughout the legislation. It makes for stricter application of animal health rules and a broader scope.

The Directive thus covers all production stages of a product of animal origin: primary production, processing, transport, storage and sale. It also applies to live animals intended for human consumption. It lays down animal health conditions applicable to all these stages.

General animal health requirements

The Directive makes the Member States responsible for measures needed to eradicate the transmission of animal diseases and lays down the conditions to be met for products of animal origin, banning those from areas or territories subject to animal health restrictions. In the latter case, the Directive stipulates the conditions for possible derogations.

Veterinary certificates and checks

The Directive specifies when Member States must require veterinary certificates, together with detailed rules for their application.

However, pending the adoption of the whole “hygiene package”, the Member States are responsible for official veterinary controls and measures applicable where infringements of the animal health rules are found.

Imports from non-EU countries

The competent authorities of the Member States must take the necessary measures to ensure that imported products of animal origin comply with the requirements applicable to Community products.

The Directive makes provision for the creation and updating of lists of non-EU countries or regions of non-EU countries from which imports are authorised. It lays down the conditions a country needs to meet to be included in these lists. Among other requirements, the Directive requires non-EU countries and regions to undergo a compulsory Community audit and obtain a veterinary certificate in accordance with the specific procedure set out in the Directive.

The Community inspections and/or audits can be carried out throughout the food chain in the non-EU countries included in the lists.

Revision clause

The Directive contains a revision clause with a view to amending the Annexes, where the following are specified: animal diseases covered (Annex I), description of the compulsory elements, which should include special identification markings for meat from a territory subject to animal health restrictions (Annex II), and general principles of certification (Annex IV).

Background

In January 2000, the Commission presented a complete recast of legislation dealing with food hygiene and veterinary aspects “hygiene package”. This reorganisation comprises five acts on the following subjects:

  • food hygiene;
  • specific hygiene rules for food of animal origin;
  • official controls on products of animal origin intended for human consumption,
  • animal health rules governing the production, placing on the market and import of products of animal origin for human consumption (the subject of this factsheet);
  • official food and feed controls.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2002/99/EC 01.01.2005 31.12.2004 OJ L 18 of 23.01.2003

Residues of veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin

Residues of veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Residues of veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Pharmaceutical and cosmetic products

Residues of veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 470/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 6 May 2009 laying down Community procedures for the establishment of residue limits of pharmacologically active substances in foodstuffs of animal origin, repealing Council Regulation (EEC) No 2377/90 and amending Directive 2001/82/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council (Text with EEA relevance).

Summary

This Regulation aims at defining the rules and procedures to be applied when setting maximum residue limits for medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin in order to guarantee food safety.

Scope

This Regulation establishes on the one hand the maximum concentration of a residue of a pharmacologically active substance which may be permitted in foodstuffs of animal origin and on the other defines the level of residues of medicinal products for which a maximum limit has not yet been set.

Active principles of biological origin used in immunological veterinary medicinal products and substances covered by the Regulation on contaminants in foodstuffs for human consumption are excluded from its scope.

Maximum residue limits

Substances intended for use in veterinary medicinal products

The European Medicines Agency issues an opinion on any application relating to a pharmacologically active substance intended for use in veterinary medicinal products. This opinion consists of a scientific risk assessment and risk management recommendations. The Agency ensures that the final opinion of the Committee is given within 210 days.

Other substances requiring an opinion from the Agency

The European Commission or Member States may submit to the Agency a request for an opinion on maximum residue limits in the following cases:

  • the use of the substance in question is authorised in a third country but has not been subject to an application for the establishment of a maximum residue limit by the Agency;
  • the substance in question is contained in a medicinal product but has not been subject to an application for the establishment of a maximum residue limit by the Agency.

The Agency shall ensure that the opinion of the Committee concerning a relevant request from the European Commission or Member States is given within 210 days.

Once the opinions have been published, the Commission, in consultation with the Agency, Member States and interested parties, shall adopt the following measures:

  • methodological principles to be applied following the risk assessment and recommendations described above;
  • rules concerning the use of a maximum residue limit for medicinal products.

Classification

The Commission classifies the pharmacologically active substances which have already been subject to an opinion from the Agency. This classification includes a list of pharmacologically active substances and the therapeutic classes to which they belong, as well as the following:

  • a maximum residue limit;
  • a provisional maximum residue limit (for a period not exceeding five years);
  • the absence of the need to establish a maximum residue limit;
  • a prohibition on the administration of a substance.

A maximum residue limit may be provided if scientific data is incomplete, as long as the substance does not constitute a hazard to human health. It is presupposed that the residues do not constitute a hazard to the health of individuals.

It is possible to obtain an emergency authorisation for a veterinary medicinal product or biocide product by making an application to the Agency to carry out an accelerated procedure for the assessment of the maximum residue limit. The Agency shall ensure that the final opinion of the Committee is given within 120 days.

Reference points for action

The Commission can establish reference points for action for residues of pharmacologically active substances which are not classified.

Reference points for action are established in consultation with official control laboratories in accordance with a method corresponding to Community requirements.

A request for a risk assessment may be sent to the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in order to determine whether the reference points for action are adequate.

Various provisions

The Agency consults Community reference laboratories using analytical methods which are appropriate for analysing residues. The aim of this consultation is also to achieve harmonised controls in order to provide information on the methods used during the authorisation procedure for official control laboratories.

When placed on the market, foodstuffs of animal origin which contain residues of medicinal products at a level exceeding the limit established by this Regulation or containing an unclassified substance are not considered as complying with the legislation.

This Regulation repeals Regulation (EC) No 2377/90. The Commission includes pharmacologically active substances and their classification from Regulation (EC) No 2377/90 in Annexes I to IV.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 470/2009

6.7.2009

OJ L 152 of 16.6.2009

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EU) No 37/2010 of 22 December 2009 on pharmacologically active substances and their classification regarding maximum residue limits in foodstuffs of animal origin [Official Journal L 15 of 20.1.2010].