Tag Archives: Fishery management

Recovery of cod stocks

Recovery of cod stocks

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Recovery of cod stocks

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Maritime Affairs And Fisheries > Management of fisheries resources and the environment

Recovery of cod stocks

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1342/2008 of 18 December 2008 establishing a long-term plan for cod stocks and the fisheries exploiting those stocks and repealing Regulation (EC) No 423/2004 [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The long-term plan for the recovery of cod stocks should ensure the sustainable exploitation of cod resources on the basis of maximum sustainable yield.

Geographical areas

The recovery plan applies to the following geographical areas:

  • the Kattegat;
  • the North Sea, the Skagerrak and the eastern Channel;
  • the west of Scotland;
  • the Irish Sea.

Total allowable catch (TAC)

The Council will determine the TAC each year for the following year, for each of the cod stocks in the areas set out. The TAC is set according to the optimal fishing rate in order to guarantee the maximum sustainable catch. Under the new recovery plan, the TAC will no longer be set according to levels of biomass (quantity of fish in the sea). It will be calculated after subtracting the quantity of discards of cod and the quantity corresponding to other sources of fishing mortality.

Fishing mortality will be reduced from one year to the next, by 25 %, 15 % or 10 % according to the condition of the stocks, until the mortality rate reaches 0.4.

If the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF) does not have sufficient information on the condition of stocks, the plan provides for:

  • a reduction in fishing mortality of 25 % where scientific opinion recommends a reduction in catches at the lowest level possible;
  • a reduction in fishing mortality of 15 % in other cases.

Limiting the fishing effort

This Regulation introduces a new management system for the fishing effort which fixes thresholds (expressed in kilowatt-days) per group of vessels or fleet segment *, taking into account the fishing gear and meshes used. The management of these thresholds shall be carried out by Member States. The latter shall take the appropriate measures to guarantee that the effort does not exceed the forecasted limits.

The Regulation includes an innovation. Member States may allow additional fishing effort rates for some vessels that follow best practices in order to reduce their cod catches. This measure will encourage, amongst other things, the use of more selective trawls and compliance with boxes targeting spawning areas. Nevertheless, fishing efforts should not increase.

Member States are authorised to transfer fishing effort and capacity between geographical areas and between effort groups *.

Designated ports

Landings of over two tonnes of cod are authorised only in the designated ports. Member States shall designate these ports and set inspection and surveillance procedures relating thereto, including the conditions for recording and reporting the quantities of cod landed.

Context

This Regulation is based on the opinions of the interested parties, who met on the occasion of the conference on the recovery of cod stocks in March 2007.

The Commission will evaluate the impact of management measures on cod stocks and the fisheries concerned at the latest during the third year of application of this Regulation and then every three years. Where appropriate, the Commission may propose relevant measures to amend the Regulation based on opinions provided by the STECF and having consulted the relevant Regional Advisory Council.

Key terms of the Act
  • Fleet segment: a group of vessels belonging to the same length class (overall length) and having the same main fishing gear throughout the year. Vessels may carry out different fishing activities during the reference period but may only be classed in one fleet segment.
  • Effort group: a management unit of a Member State for which a maximum allowable fishing effort is set. It is defined by a gear grouping and a geographical area.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) 1342/2008

1.1.2009

L 348, 24.12.2008

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1224/2009

23.12.2009

L 343, 22.12.2009

The successive amendments and corrections to Regulation (EC) No 1342/2008 have been incorporated in to the original text. This consolidated versionis for reference purposes only.

Related Acts

Council Regulation (EU) No 57/2011 of 18 January 2011 fixing for 2011 the fishing opportunities for certain fish stocks and groups of fish stocks, applicable in EU waters and, for EU vessels, in certain non-EU waters.

Maximum sustainable yield

Maximum sustainable yield

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maximum sustainable yield

Topics

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Maritime Affairs And Fisheries > Management of fisheries resources and the environment

Maximum sustainable yield

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament: Implementing sustainability in EU fisheries through maximum sustainable yield [COM(2006) 360 – not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Through this Communication, the Commission aims to improve the economic performance of the fisheries sector and ensure the industry’s viability in keeping with the spirit of the decisions made at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg.

At that summit, the Commission and Member States signed up to the aim of achieving a maximum sustainable yield (MSY) for depleted stocks by 2015 at the latest.

The Commission considers that the time has come for Community fisheries management to be handled differently, looking for success rather than merely seeking to avoid failure, by replacing stocks using MSY-based management.

The Commission draws attention to the potential benefits of this new Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) guideline. Several scientific studies have shown that management based on maximum sustainable yield (MSY) could restore 80 % of the European fish stocks currently affected by overfishing.

The MSY approach is based on a long-term strategy whereby catch rates are fixed, enabling fish stocks to reproduce so that exploitation can occur in sustainable economic, environmental and social conditions.

The benefits of an approach based on MSY

The Commission feels that fishing at MSY levels would help reverse the trend of allowing aquatic stocks to run out. This approach would benefit the sea environment as a whole, since it would lead to an increase in available resources and renewed balance within ecosystems.

The approach also brings economic benefits, since it allows for a reduction in the cost of fishing activity. Exploitation of stocks will become less problematic once the availability of resources becomes more stable again.

Fishing within MSY limits will mean that the number of large-scale and high-value catches will increase while the proportion of discards will decrease.

In recent years, over 10 million tonnes of fish have been imported each year, which represents 60 % of European fish consumption. An MSY approach to fisheries management would increase the European fisheries industry’s competitive edge by ensuring stable and high-quality supply.

Making this approach a reality

Fisheries management has to be based on sustainability and stability. The Commission is therefore recommending a balance between fishing activity and the reproductive capacity of fisheries resources.

In order to meet this objective, it is important to define, on a yearly basis, appropriate catch rates for the different stocks of fish. The Commission has already emphasised the importance of improving the process by which fishery management decisions are made.

The success of the transition to this new approach is dependent on the ability of national fishery authorities to adapt to a new situation, and also on regular consultation between the Commission and these authorities.

This period of gradual adaptation may result in two different approaches. One would involve Member States being able to encourage the development of a smaller, more efficient and more profitable fishing sector, one which would involve lower numbers of fishermen. The other would involve employment in Member States remaining high, without a reduction in fleet sizes, although this would mean companies being less profitable.

Since Member States decide on an economic strategy for fishing, the Commission notes that in the past, solutions other than the decommissioning of fishing vessels have created problems of enforcement and social acceptance, since it is difficult to maintain an over-large fishing fleet without using it.

Long-term plans

The Commission will propose, over the coming years, a series of long-term plans to ensure that, by 2015, resources exploited in Community waters will reach MSY levels. Each plan will define the fishing rate appropriate for the stock in question. The principles governing these long-term plans consist of:

  • consultation with fishermen, consumers and any other stakeholders;
  • impartial scientific advice being the basis of any plans;
  • the economic, social and environmental impact of proposed measures being taken into account;
  • a target fishing rate and a means of gradually reaching that target being set;
  • the harmful effects of fishing on the ecosystem being reduced;
  • where different stocks are normally caught together, technical measures ensuring that fishing of all the stock is compatible with their respective targets;
  • the possibility of exploiting some stocks more lightly than at MSY levels in order to achieve some gain of productivity for other species;
  • targets being set irrespective of the biological condition of the stock when the plans enter into force, even though the plans may require stronger conservation measures if a resource is depleted more quickly than expected;
  • appropriate guidelines if, due to lack of data or other circumstances, scientific advice cannot quantify the actions needed to meet maximum sustainable yield conditions;
  • plans and targets being subject to periodic review.

Background

During the 2002 reform of the CFP, the importance of longer-term fisheries management in order to preserve sustainable fish resources was emphasised. This was also reflected in the organisation of plans to replace the stocks most at risk. However, overfishing has meant that catch rates for several species have been much reduced over several years. There is therefore, according to the Commission, the need for a further stage and to reverse the downward trend as regards the majority of fish resources. At the World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg in 2002, Member States also made a commitment to bringing stocks to levels compatible with the principle of MSY by 2015 at the latest.

Destructive fishing practices in the high seas and the protection of ecosystems

Destructive fishing practices in the high seas and the protection of ecosystems

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Destructive fishing practices in the high seas and the protection of ecosystems

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Maritime Affairs And Fisheries > Management of fisheries resources and the environment

Destructive fishing practices in the high seas and the protection of ecosystems

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 17 October 2007 on destructive fishing practices in the high seas and the protection of vulnerable deep sea ecosystems [COM(2007) 604 final – not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Commission is proposing an ambitious strategy for the protection of fragile ecosystems in the high seas based on the precautionary principle and on prior impact assessment. This also responds to the appeal launched by the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in Resolution 61/105 to regulate fisheries in vulnerable deep-sea ecosystems.

Destructive fishing practices in the high seas

The biodiversity and equilibrium of deep-sea marine ecosystems are at threat from human activity. Bottom fishing practices and gears (bottom trawls, dredges, bottom-set gillnets, etc.) may cause irreversible damage to vulnerable marine habitats. Activities such as the production of hydrocarbons, laying of submarine cables or waste dumping, etc. pose other threats.

This finding is based on studies which demonstrated damage to deep coral reefs in the Northeast Atlantic, the West Atlantic and the Tasman Sea.

These activities are also likely to put achievement of the objectives of the 2002 Johannesburg Summit on Sustainable Development at risk.

Action of the European Union

The action of the European Union (EU) is guided by recommendations made in United Nations Resolution 61/105 for the protection of the vulnerable deep-sea marine environment. This resolution, to which the Commission made an active contribution, calls on Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs) and States to adopt and implement measures by 31 December 2008, in accordance with the precautionary principle, ecosystem approaches and international law. These measures define a management system for bottom fishing in the high seas which is based on:

  • impact assessment prior to authorisation of fishing activities;
  • identification of vulnerable marine ecosystems through research and data collection;
  • closure of sensitive areas.

This strategy proposes the ways to implement these recommendations and to go further.

The EU must provide impetus on a global scale for protection of vulnerable deep-sea marine ecosystems, in particular by stimulating international debate. It will support creation of a report on the progress made in the fight against destructive fishing practices which will be presented to the United Nations in 2009. In addition, the EU will further assist the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) in compiling and disseminating reliable information on the measures adopted by the Member States. This information will be used as a foundation for technical guidelines for deep sea fisheries. Similarly, collaboration with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the Regional Marine Conventions will help identify the marine habitats under threat.

RFMOs already exist in the majority of high-seas areas. Ecosystem protection measures have been adopted in these areas, but they must be complemented by a systematic and preventive approach for managing environmental risks. To achieve a high and effective level of protection against damage related to fishing activities, the RFMOs may apply stricter rules to reinforce the protection.

Before the creation of an RFMO, interim measures may be implemented by the States for the conservation and management of zones affected by bottom fishing. The EU is backing this approach as part of ongoing negotiations on the implementation of a new RFMO in the South Pacific. It is also undertaking to help develop interim measures in the Indian Ocean in preparation for an agreement in 2008 and transpose them into Community legislation. In areas where no RFMO is yet in place, the EU is encouraging the launching of negotiations between the parties interested in establishing these organisations.

In areas of the high seas not regulated by an RFMO, bottom fishing activities by Community vessels should be governed by the regulation accompanying this Communication (see Related Acts). This Regulation, which is scheduled for adoption in 2008, implements the United Nations recommendations in respect of these vessels. It stipulates that Community vessels must obtain a special fishing permit for bottom fishing in these areas, which will only be issued after an impact assessment. This should assess the risk of adverse effects on vulnerable marine ecosystems caused by the fishing in question on the basis of detailed operation plans. It also lays down the requirements relating to monitoring and control, for example the presence of on-board observers, and satellite monitoring (VMS) provisions. In addition, it proposes banning the use of bottom fishing gears at depths greater than 1 000 metres. Vessels authorised to fish should also inform the competent authorities of sites with vulnerable ecosystems which they may discover during their operations so that they can be protected if necessary.

Background

The commitment made in Johannesburg positions the issue of destructive fishing practices in a global context. Fisheries must no longer be considered in isolation, but must be fully integrated into a broader sustainability perspective, including the high seas. This is also the approach taken by the Commission’s current proposals for an integrated maritime policy. The EU is determined to follow the principles established in United Nations Resolution 61/105 on the sustainability of fisheries adopted in December 2006.

Related Acts

Council Regulation (EC) No 734/2008 of 15 July 2008 on the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the high seas from the adverse impacts of bottom fishing gears [Official Journal L 201 of 30.070.2008].

Protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the high seas from bottom fishing

Protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the high seas from bottom fishing

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the high seas from bottom fishing

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Maritime Affairs And Fisheries > Management of fisheries resources and the environment

Protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the high seas from bottom fishing

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 734/2008 of 15 July 2008 on the protection of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the high seas from the adverse impacts of bottom fishing gears.

Summary

The scope of this Regulation applies to Community fishing vessels using bottom fishing gears * for their activities on the high seas. Vessels which operate in an area regulated by a Regional fisheries management organisation (RFMO) are not subject to this Regulation. It does apply to vessels which carry out activities in an area where an RFMO is in the stages of development and intermediate measures for the protection of the marine environment have been adopted.

To be able to carry out activities with bottom fishing gears in the high seas, Community vessels must obtain a special fishing permit. Applications for special fishing permits must be accompanied by a detailed fishing plan specifying:

  • the area of activity;
  • the targeted species;
  • the type and conditions of use of the gears deployed;
  • a map of the seabed where the fishing activities will be carried out, if necessary.

The permit is issued by the Flag State after they have carried out an impact assessment. This study is based on scientific and technical data relating to the location of vulnerable marine ecosystems * in the area of activity detailed in the fishing plan. It must demonstrate that the fishing activities will not have a significant adverse impact * on the ecosystems in question.

Any changes to the fishing plan must be notified to the competent authority who will examine whether the changes are likely to threaten areas where vulnerable marine ecosystems occur or are likely to occur. The competent authority in the Flag State shall withdraw the special fishing permit if a vessel does not comply with the specified fishing plan.

The principle of precaution applies when the competent authority does not have reliable scientific information on a given area at its disposal. In this case, the use of bottom gears is forbidden. Bottom fishing activities are only authorised when they present no risk of damaging vulnerable marine ecosystems.

When a vessel has an unforeseen encounter with a vulnerable marine ecosystem it must leave the site and refrain from fishing activities in the area. They are only authorised to resume fishing activities in an area foreseen in their fishing plan located a minimum distance of five nautical miles from the site of the encounter. With as little delay as possible, the vessel must inform the competent authorities of their encounter, providing important details such as the nature, location, time, etc. of the encounter.

Member States shall proceed with area closures to fishing with bottom gears when the scientific information confirms the occurrence or likelihood of occurrence of vulnerable marine ecosystems in the area open to fishing. Member States must inform the Commission of any closures. The Commission is then responsible for circulating the notification to all Member States.

In the event of failure of the satellite vessel monitoring system (VMS) fitted on-board a fishing vessel, the master of the vessel must report its geographical location to the Fisheries Monitoring Centre (FMC) in the Flag State every two hours. The vessel is only authorised to return to sea once the competent authority has confirmed that the VMS is functioning perfectly again.

Observers shall monitor the activities of vessels granted a special fishing permit throughout the execution of the fishing plan. During the observation period, the observers must compile information on the catch, changes to the fishing plan, encounters with vulnerable ecosystems, as well as record the depth at which gear is deployed. Observers shall submit a report to the competent authorities in the Member State concerned within twenty days following the end of their mission. A copy of the report shall then be sent to the Commission.

Context

This Regulation forms part of the common fisheries policy and the Union’s environment policy in that it establishes rules which will enable the prevention and cessation of adverse impacts of certain fishing practices on the marine environment.

The Regulation implements the recommendations formulated by the General Assembly of the United Nations (Resolution 61/105 of 8 December 2006) regarding the adoption of measures to eliminate destructive fishing practices.

Key terms of the act
  • Bottom gears: gears deployed in the normal course of fishing operations in contact with the seabed, including bottom trawls, dredges, bottom-set gill nets, bottom-set longlines, pots and traps.
  • Marine ecosystem: a dynamic complex of plant, animal and microorganism communities and their nonliving environment interacting as a functional unit.
  • Vulnerable marine ecosystem: any marine ecosystem whose integrity is threatened by significant adverse impacts resulting from physical contact with bottom gears in the normal course of fishing operations, including, inter alia, reefs, seamounts, hydrothermal vents, cold water corals or cold water sponge beds. The most vulnerable ecosystems are those that are easily disturbed and in addition are very slow to recover, or may never recover.
  • Significant adverse impacts: impacts which compromise ecosystem integrity in a manner that impairs the ability of affected populations to replace themselves and that degrades the long-term natural productivity of habitats, or causes on more than a temporary basis significant loss of species richness, habitat or community types.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition into the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 734/2008

31.7.2008

OJ L 201 of 30.7.2008

Conservation and management of sharks

Conservation and management of sharks

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Conservation and management of sharks

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Protection of nature and biodiversity

Conservation and management of sharks

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council of 5 February 2009 on a European Community Action Plan for the Conservation and Management of Sharks [COM(2009) 40 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Sharks belong to the family of chondrichthyans or cartilaginous fish, as do skate and chimaera. Chondrichthyans include more than 1000 species which are very different from a morphological point of view. Some of them are almost extinct due to their biological cycle and over-fishing.

Objectives

This Action Plan is based on the 1999 FAO International Plan of action for the conservation and management of sharks (IPOA SHARKS), the objective of which is to guarantee the conservation and management of sharks which had been decimated by the Community fleet.

This Action Plan pursues three specific objectives:

  • to improve knowledge of fisheries and shark species, as well as their role in the ecosystem;
  • to introduce sustainable exploitation of shark stocks and to reduce by-catches;
  • to enhance a coherent approach between the internal and external Community policy for sharks.

Scope

This Action Plan applies to fisheries:

  • located in Community waters;
  • covered by an agreement or partnership between the Community and third countries;
  • located in international waters (high seas);
  • covered by a Regional Fishery Management Organisation (RFMO).

It covers directed commercial fishing, recreational fishing and bycatches of any chondrichthyan.

Guidelines

The Community must develop a gradual strategy to deal with shark-related issues. The development of this strategy is based on scientific data collected under the multi-annual Community programme for data collection pursuant to Regulation (EC) No 199/2008. This programme supplements the assessment of the stocks status carried out by the ICES working group on sharks through 2007-2009.

The conservation of shark species requires that regional cooperation be strengthened, through RFMOs, the Convention on Migratory Species (CMS) and the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The range of the different species is not limited to Community waters. It is for this reason in particular that the Community requests support for the work carried out by the RFMOs, reinforcement of the role of existing RFMOs in fisheries management policy and cooperation in creating new RFMOs in areas which lack them.

Proper management of shark stocks requires an integrated framework of actions. The Community Action Plan is structured in accordance with the FAO shark-plan. It includes a set of measures intended to improve data collection and scientific advice, management and technical measures and a further strengthening of the application of the shark finning ban.

Main actions

The Community Action Plan foresees:

  • increasing investments in shark data collection;
  • establishing systems to provide verification of catch information by species and by fishery;
  • improving the monitoring and reporting of catch, bycatch and discards, as well as market and international trade data;
  • preparing and implementing measures to assist in species identification and monitoring, as called for in the IPAO-SHARKS;
  • facilitating stakeholder awareness-raising and consultation regarding shark management and best practices to reduce by-catches;
  • launching educational programmes aimed specifically at educating the public about chondrichthyan conservation programmes;
  • adapting catches and fishing effort to available resources;
  • limitation or prohibition of fishing activities in areas that are considered sensitive for endangered stocks;
  • prohibiting all shark discards in the medium to long term and requiring that all catches be landed;
  • increasing selectivity in order to reduce by-catches;
  • confirmation of the shark finning ban.

Autorisation to fish in third-country waters

Autorisation to fish in third-country waters

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Autorisation to fish in third-country waters

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Maritime Affairs And Fisheries > External relations and enlargement

Autorisation to fish in third-country waters

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1006/2008 of 29 September 2008 concerning authorisations for fishing activities of Community fishing vessels outside Community waters and the access of third country vessels to Community waters, amending Regulations (EEC) No 2847/93 and (EC) No 1627/94 and repealing Regulation (EC) No 3317/94.

Summary

This Regulation lays down the procedures to be followed for the granting of fishing authorisations *. These authorisations permit Community fishing vessels to engage in their activities outside Community waters and third country fishing vessels to engage in fishing activities in Community waters. Authorisations are granted in the light of a certain number of eligibility criteria associated with the international obligations entered into by the Community and the provisions of this Regulation.

FISHING ACTIVITIES OF COMMUNITY VESSELS OUTSIDE COMMUNITY WATERS

To engage in fishing activities in third country waters, Community vessels must obtain an authorisation issued in accordance with this Regulation.

Granting of fishing authorisations

The flag Member State shall transmit the applications for fishing vessels flying its flag to the Commission no later than five working days before the deadline stated in the agreement or in accordance with the arrangement provided for in the agreement with the third country.

The Commission shall verify the applications in accordance with the eligibility criteria and shall ensure that the eligible applications are transmitted to the third country concerned.

The Commission shall inform the flag Member State that the third country concerned has decided to grant or not to grant the fishing authorisation for a particular vessel.

The flag Member State shall notify this information to the owner of the fishing vessel.

Applications shall be processed electronically.

The Commission shall not transmit the applications to the third country concerned if the eligibility criteria are not complied with.

Community information system

The Commission shall set up a Community information system containing the information relating to the authorisations issued in accordance with this Regulation. This electronic system shall be secure. Member States shall ensure that the information which it contains is up-to-date at all times.

Suspension or withdrawal of a fishing authorisation

If the third country decides to suspend or withdraw a fishing authorisation for a vessel flying the flag of a Member State, the Commission shall inform the State concerned immediately. The flag Member State must then either temporarily suspend or permanently withdraw the fishing permit granted to the vessel concerned.

Underutilisation of fishing opportunities

To ensure that the fishing opportunities made available to the Community under the fishing agreements are fully utilised, the Commission may, in accordance with certain criteria, temporarily reallocate the fishing opportunities not utilised by a Member State to one or more other Member States.

FISHING ACTIVITIES OF THIRD COUNTRY VESSELS IN COMMUNITY WATERS

To engage in fishing activities in Community waters, third country vessels must obtain a fishing authorisation from the Commission.

Granting of fishing authorisations

The competent authorities of the third country shall submit to the Commission, through electronic transmission, the applications for fishing authorisations for vessels flying the flags of those third countries.

The Commission shall examine the applications for fishing authorisations in accordance with the eligibility criteria and taking account of the fishing opportunities allocated to the third country and shall issue the fishing authorisations in accordance with the measures adopted by the Council and the provisions contained in the agreement concerned.

The Commission shall inform the competent authorities of the third country and of the Member States of the fishing authorisations issued.

Failure to comply with relevant rules

Member States shall notify the Commission as soon as they record a third country fishing vessel committing an infringement in Community waters. No fishing permit shall be then issued to the fishing vessels from the third country concerned for a period not exceeding twelve months.

Transmission of catches and fishing effort

The Regulation lays down provisions relating to the declaration of catch data and, where appropriate, fishing effort.

CONTEXT

This Regulation follows on from the 2006-2008 Action Plan for simplifying and improving the Common Fisheries Policy.

This Regulation repeals Regulation (EC) No 3317/94.

Key terms of the Act
  • Fishing autorisation: the entitlement to engage in fishing activities during a specified period, in a given area or for a given fishery.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1006/2008

18.11.2008

OJ L 286 of 29.10.2008