Tag Archives: ES

Estonia – Regional Policy

Estonia – Regional Policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Regional Policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Regional Policy

Short-term priorities:

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • to continue developing the legal, administrative and budgetary framework so that Estonia can implement an integrated national policy to tackle regional disparities and participate in EU structural programmes after acccession.

Assessment (October 1999)

Estonia has adopted a regional development strategy with a view to defining its main priorities in this field.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress in this area.

Assessment (November 2001)

Estonia has revised the national development plan which constitutes its economic and social cohesion policy. As regards management of the Structural Funds, only limited progress has been made in improving administrative structures and interministerial coordination.

Assessment (October 2002)

Estonia has made substantial progress in its preparations to implement the structural policies. As regards its territorial organisation, it has reached agreement with the Commission on a provisional NUTS (Nomenclature of Territorial Statistical Units) nomenclature: the whole country is a single territory at NUTS level II and is subdivided into five geographical areas at NUTS level III. This territorial reform, introduced on a voluntary basis, has not achieved a substantial reduction in the number of local authorities. In February 2002, Estonia amended the decision on the structure for the management of the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund which designated the bodies responsible for their implementation. The decisions taken in February and April 2002 set up the different levels of intermediate bodies. As regards programming, in 2001 the government opted for a single programming document (SPD). In the spring, it presented a preliminary draft of this document to the economic and social partners. The unit responsible for evaluation and monitoring, which is part of the Ministry of Finance, began the ex-ante evaluation of the SPD. The internal audit units were also set up within the central government paying agencies. The compilation of regional statistical data continued.

Estonia closed the negotiating chapter on regional policy without requesting transitional provisions. Its efforts must be concentrated primarily on preparing an integrated development strategy to reduce regional disparities and completing the draft of the SPD. Progress on the establishment of institutional structures is satisfactory with the designation of the bodies responsible for implementation of the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund. However, the April 2002 decision on the delegation of responsibilities will have to be revised and the roles of the intermediate bodies specified. Progress is required as regards interministerial coordination and improving administrative capacity with particular regard to staff training. Estonia has made good progress in establishing specific procedures for financial control, audit, the certification of expenditures and the correction of irregularities. The government has also adopted common guidelines for audits.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.3.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.4.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Political criteria

Estonia – Political criteria

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Political criteria

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Political criteria

Short-term priorities:

  • adoption of measures aimed at simplifying the naturalisation process and improving the integration of non-Estonian nationals, in particular stateless children;
  • improving access to Estonian language teaching for non-Estonian speakers.

Assessment (October 1999)

Estonia has amended the law on citizenship with regard to stateless children. Steps have also been taken to assist the integration of non-Estonian speakers, but further efforts are needed. The current version of the language law represents a step backwards in the political integration of non-citizens. This priority has therefore been only partially achieved.

Assessment (November 2000)

Amendments have been made to the language law to bring it into line with the Europe Agreement. A programme of national integration for non-Estonians has been adopted.

Assessment (November 2001)

Estonia has continued to develop the programme of national integration.

Assessment (October 2002)

The independence and efficiency of the judiciary have continued to be strengthened. Court infrastructure and computerisation is improving, although citizens’ access to justice is not. The new Code of Criminal Procedure must be adopted.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • continuing with the integration of non-citizens by improving training in Estonian for Russian speakers in primary and secondary schools and organising courses for adults;
  • adoption of additional measures to speed up the process of naturalisation.

Assessment (October 1999)

Estonia has upheld its commitment to a policy of greater integration of non-citizens. Amendments have been made to the law on citizenship to allow citizenship to be granted to stateless children. Other steps have also been taken to enhance the learning of Estonian in schools.

Assessment (November 2000)

The implementation of the programme for the national integration of non-Estonians needs to be monitored.

Assessment (November 2001)

The programme contains measures which improve the teaching of Estonian to allophones.

Assessment (October 2002)

The integration of non-citizens is continuing through the implementation of the integration programme. Efforts must be made to ensure that the implementation of language legislation complies with international obligations and respects the principles of justified public interest and proportionality.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97)2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98)705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999)504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2000)704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2001)700 final – SEC(2001)1747/2
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2002)700 final – SEC(2002)1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Economic reform

Estonia – Economic reform

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Economic reform

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Economic reform

Short-term priorities:

  • establishment of medium-term economic policy priorities and joint assessment within the framework of the Europe Agreement;
  • maintenance of high growth, while reducing inflation and increasing the level of national savings;
  • acceleration of land reform with a view to increasing private ownership;
  • introduction of key legislation linked to pension reform.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities had been partially met.

Estonia had not yet elaborated a medium-term economic strategy. The privatisation process in the manufacturing sector had been completed. Privatisation of the big utility companies had progressed further but still had to be completed in the energy sector. Further efforts to restructure companies would be needed over several years, particularly in the food processing sector. Land reform had moved forward but it was far from completed; legislation related to pension reform had to be completed.

Assessment (November 2000)

The restructuring plan for the oil-shale industry had yet to be completed. Land reform continued to be slow. A medium-term economic strategy had been drawn up. A law on pension reform had been adopted but other measures needed to be taken to complete the reform programme.

Assessment (November 2001)

The privatisation process was continuing. Basic legislation had been adopted with a view to reforming pensions. Gradual progress had been made on land reform.

Assessment (October 2002)

Overall, the priorities of the accession partnership in this field have been partially met. Implementation of the measures laid down in the action plan is behind schedule.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • completion of the pensions reform;
  • establishment of an annual budget audit procedure;
  • facilitation of business start-ups and development, with special emphasis on SMEs;
  • completion of the land reform.

Assessment (November 2001)

A budget audit procedure had been adopted. Work had been done on improving the business climate. Progress had been made in restructuring the oil-shale sector.

Assessment (October 2002)

The application of the plan for restructuring the oil-shale sector is progressing slowly despite the fact that partial privatisation of the industry has been called off. Estonia has continued to work towards improving the conditions offered to private companies and in January 2002 it adopted a new strategy called “Enterprise Estonia”.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97)2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98)705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999)504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000)704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001)700 final – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002)700 final – SEC(2002) 1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Estonia – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Short-term priorities:

  • strengthening of the bodies responsible for regulation and control;
  • drawing up a general national training strategy for civil servants;
  • drawing up a strategy and timetable for consolidating the various monitoring agencies active in the financial sector;
  • strengthening the relevant plant health and veterinary administrations, particularly as regards infrastructures at external borders;
  • strengthening environmental institutions;
  • making a start on setting up the necessary structures for structural and regional policies.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been partially achieved.

Estonia must continue its efforts to step up institutional and administrative capacity. No reform strategy for the public administration has yet been adopted. Further efforts are needed to create and strengthen monitoring and implementing bodies (especially in the fields of consumer protection, industrial and intellectual property, taxation, customs, mobile assets, competition, environment and plant health). A programme to consolidate monitoring agencies in the financial sector has already been adopted but no formal decision has been taken on how to implement it.

Assessment (November 2000)

Rural and national development plans are being drawn up. Progress has been made on the legislative framework for internal and external financial controls. Anti-fraud structures and audit units within finance institutions have not yet been put in place. More progress is needed on the independence of national internal auditors. Training for judges has been improved.

Assessment (November 2001)

The paying agent for SAPARD has been accredited. Progress has been made in the programming and management of the ISPA. Audit units and internal controls have been put in place. Anti-fraud structures and the independence of national internal auditors must be implemented. Training for judges has made good progress.

Assessment (October 2002)

These priorities have not been assessed. The section on the Partnership for accession in the 2002 report focuses on issues which require more work in order to prepare Estonia for accession.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • efficient management of the public sector at central and local levels;
  • special attention should be paid to the budget process, internal financial control, statistics, customs, the environment and agriculture;
  • improving the functioning of the judicial system;
  • strengthening the relevant justice and home affairs institutions (enough suitably trained members of staff);
  • strengthening the relevant foodstuffs control administrations.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress has been made in these fields.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made on this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

The judicial system is continuing to improve. The financial control systems and statistical capacities have been strengthened. Coordination between ministries must be improved.

Assessment (October 2002)

These priorities have not been assessed.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC, 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.O4.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC, 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – internal market

Estonia – internal market

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – internal market

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – internal market

Short-term priorities:

  • continued alignment of national legislation with existing Community rules, particularly as regards public procurement, intellectual and industrial property, financial services, taxation, technical legislation and competition (in particular the transparency of state aid);
  • adoption of new legislation on competition, covering both anti-trust measures and state aid;
  • strengthening of the body responsible for monitoring state aid;
  • establishment of an initial aid inventory.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been observed only in part.

Estonia has continued aligning its legislation on free movement of goods, particularly its sectoral legislation. Progress has been much slower regarding the New Approach. In contrast, the alignment process is almost complete for the free movement of capital and freedom to provide services. However, new Estonian competition law does not fully cover the monitoring of mergers and does not fully align legislation on state aid with Community rules. The body responsible for monitoring state aid has to be strengthened.

Assessment (November 2000)

Work has continued on the alignment of legislation in the fields of the free movement of goods, competition, taxation, telecommunications and the audio-visual sector. As regards the freedom to provide services, there needs to be greater supervision of the securities markets. The capacity of the customs authorities must be increased and the Customs Code adopted. There are still a few minor obstacles to the free movement of capital.

Assessment (November 2001)

There has been good progress on public procurement. Transposition has continued on the free movement of goods. Minor obstacles to the free movement of capital still exist. A securities financial services supervisory authority has been set up. Alignment is continuing on VAT, competition and telecommunications, but the state aid inventory has still to be completed. Alignment is almost complete for the audio-visual sector. The customs code and a timetable for the implementation of certain measures have still to be adopted. The fight against fraud must be pursued.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Mediumterm priorities:

  • alignment in the fields of public procurement, financial services, money laundering, intellectual and industrial property, state aid and data protection;
  • strengthening of the bodies responsible for regulating securities, the audio-visual sector and indirect taxation;
  • upgrading of standardisation and conformity assessment structures and establishment of a market surveillance system;
  • completion of the alignment with Community rules, actual implementation of competition law, strengthening of competition authorities, promotion of enterprise development (in particular SMEs), alignment with existing Community rules in the fields of telecommunications, consumer protection and the internal energy market.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress was made in these fields.

Assessment (November 2000)

The structures for standardisation and conformity assessment must be modernised. Adequate structures for implementation in all sectors must be guaranteed.

Assessment (November 2001)

The law on industrial property is virtually in conformity with the acquis. Intellectual property law has still to be aligned. Estonia has made good progress with alignment in the fields of free movement of goods, state aid, consumer protection and mutual recognition of diplomas. Alignment has still to be completed on taxation. There has been little progress on customs matters.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/CE of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97)2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98)705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999)504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000)704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Justice and Home Affairs

Estonia – Justice and Home Affairs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Justice and Home Affairs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Justice and Home Affairs

Short-term priorities:

  • Implementing measures to combat corruption and organised crime and to continue judicial reform.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities were partially met.

Estonia had continued to make efforts in the fight against corruption and organised crime. Steps to restructure and modernise the police had also been taken. However, further efforts needed to be made, in particular to fight corruption within the police and to improve police efficiency. The same applied to the judiciary where training of judges and prosecutors had to be intensified, especially with regard to Community law. Limited training and low salaries continued to jeopardise the progress achieved in this area. Greater political and administrative attention had to be paid to the drugs situation. Estonia had reached a relatively high standard of security on its eastern border. Border infrastructures and equipment needed to be further developed, however, and the facilitated border-crossing procedures had to be brought into line with EU visa practice.

Assessment (November 2000)

Estonia had taken steps to create an advanced integrated criminal investigation data system and to strengthen capacities to deal with money laundering. It had also ratified the 1988 UN Convention on illicit drug trafficking and the European Convention on money laundering. Limited progress had been made on completing the reform of criminal law. Further efforts needed to be made to ensure better coordination among law enforcement bodies and the judiciary.

Assessment (November 2001)

The criminal law system has been partially reformed. Further efforts are needed to ensure coordination between the courts and law enforcement bodies. Measures to combat organised crime must be stepped up as this priority has been fulfilled only in part.

Assessment (October 2002)

Progress is still being made in the fight against organised crime. However capacities need to be strengthened to deal with money laundering. Legislative alignment is largely complete. However, Estonia still needs to take the necessary steps to transpose Community instruments, mainly by adopting and applying the new criminal and civil law codes. Judges are receiving training in accordance with the action plan.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • ratification and application of necessary international legal instruments relevant to the Community acquis;
  • enhance border management, especially on the eastern border;
  • implementation of migration policy and asylum procedures;
  • alignment of visa policy with that of the European Union and completion of alignment with international conventions;
  • fight against organised crime (particularly money laundering, drug trafficking and trafficking in human beings), in the light of the Schengen acquis.

Assessment (October 1999)

Estonia had continued to make efforts in the fight against corruption and organised crime. It had adopted laws on asylum and money laundering. Its visa policy had almost been brought into line with the Schengen acquis.

Assessment (November 2000)

Visa policy had been aligned with that of the European Union.

Assessment (November 2001)

Visa policy had been brought into line with EU requirements. However, further work still needed to be done on border controls, immigration and police cooperation with Europol.

Assessment (October 2002)

Measures are being taken to align legislation regarding visas, legal immigration and asylum, apply legislation on border control and migration to prevent illegal immigration, and implement the law on refugees. Progress has already been made in strengthening border management and control, including maritime surveillance. Nevertheless, steps still need to be taken to adapt the infrastructure and equipment necessary for border control.
The capacity to fight drug trafficking should be stepped up.
Legislative alignment with the Convention on the financial interests of the Communities and its protocols should be completed.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97)2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98)705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999)504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000)704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001)700 final – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000)700 final – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Environment

Estonia – Environment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Environment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Environment

Short-term priorities:

  • continued transposition of framework legislation;
  • establishment of detailed approximation programmes and implementation strategies related to individual acts;
  • planning and initial implementation of these programmes and strategies.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been partially met.

Estonia has continued to move ahead with its transposition of framework Directives, particularly in sectors such as air, waste and chemicals. Efforts are still needed on industrial risk management, nature protection and genetically modified organisms. Administrative capacity to implement and enforce legislation needs to be reinforced, especially at local level.

Assessment (November 2000)

Progress has been made in transposing legislation in the areas of water management and waste management, air pollution and industries. Limited progress has been made in the area of nature protection. Legislation on environment impact assessment has been adopted. Further efforts must be made in drawing up plans for financing investment.

Assessment (November 2001)

Transposition and implementation of the legislation on environmental impact assessment and transposition of the directives on water management, waste management, air pollution, nature protection and industries have continued. Efforts now need to focus on enforcement and on drawing up plans for financing investment.

Assessment (October 2002)

Transposition of the acquis is largely complete, though its implementation is not. Further efforts are required in relation to the landfill of waste, the discharge of dangerous substances in the aquatic environment and nitrate pollution from agricultural sources.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • development of monitoring and implementation control structures and capacities;
  • on-going planning and implementation of approximation programmes related to individual legal acts;
  • particular emphasis on the water and waste sectors, including radioactive waste, and atmospheric pollution;
  • environmental protection requirements and the need for sustainable development need to be integrated into the definition and implementation of national sectoral plans.

Assessment (October 1999)

Estonia has adopted framework legislation in the areas of water, waste and atmospheric pollution.

Assessment (November 2000)

There has been no progress regarding this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

Estonia has made some progress with implementing the legislation. There is a need to strengthen the administration, particularly at local level. The environment has been taken into account when defining other policies.

Assessment (October 2002)

Administrative capacity has been strengthened to some extent, particularly at regional and local level. Integration of the environment into other sectoral policies has continued.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Economic policy

Estonia – Economic policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Economic policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Economic policy

Short-term priorities:

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • regular review of the joint assessment of economic policy priorities, within the Europe Agreement framework, focusing on satisfying the Copenhagen criteria for membership of the Union and the acquis in the area of economic and monetary policy (coordination of economic policies, submission of convergence programmes, avoidance of excessive deficits);
  • while Estonia is not expected to adopt the euro immediately on accession, it is expected to pursue policies which aim to achieve real convergence in accordance with the Union’s objectives of economic and social cohesion, and nominal convergence compatible with the ultimate goal of adoption of the euro.

Assessment (October 1999)

Estonia has continued its efforts to align its legislation on the acquis with a view to the possible future adoption of the euro.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made with this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

The implementation of this priority has only partially been carried out. Little progress has been made in privatising industry and liberalising public services.

Assessment (October 2002)

A large number of objectives have already been achieved on the basis of previous accession partnerships. The 2002 partnership report therefore focuses on very specific outstanding issues and does not provide an overview of Estonia’s preparedness for economic and monetary union.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.03.1998
Official Journal L 121 of 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report SEC(2001) 1746 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

 

Estonia – Agriculture

Estonia – Agriculture

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Estonia – Agriculture

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Estonia

Estonia – Agriculture

Short-term priorities

Agriculture

  • to continue aligning and improving animal and plant health inspection;
  • to continue modernising the food industry, particularly the processing of milk products, meat and fish.

Assessment (November 2000)

There had been progress on veterinary inspection. However, no progress had been made on the treatment of animal waste or on animal welfare. The modernisation of food processing establishments had not been completed.

Assessment (November 2001)

Progress had been recorded as regards veterinary and plant health inspection. The modernisation of food processing establishments had not yet been completed.

Assessment (October 2002)

Estonia is continuing its efforts in the veterinary sphere. It will have to improve its plant health inspection system and border controls. Compliance with quality standards for food products will also have to be monitored.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities

Agriculture

  • aligning with Community rules on agriculture (in particular animal and plant health, with particular emphasis on inspections at the external frontiers);
  • completing the land restitution process;
  • developing the capacity to implement and enforce the common agricultural policy, in particular the fundamental management mechanisms and the administrative structures to monitor the agricultural markets;
  • implementing structural and rural development measures;
  • adopting and implementing veterinary and plant health rules;
  • bringing certain food processing centres and testing and diagnostic facilities up to scratch;
  • restructuring the agri-food industry.

Assessment (October 1999)

No progress had been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress had been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2001)

Work had continued on the mechanisms for managing the agricultural policy and on administrative structures. Progress was needed as regards modernising the food industry and in the veterinary sector.

Assessment (October 2002)

Progress has been achieved, but the paying authority will require further reinforcement.

Fisheries

Assessment (November 2001)

Revision of the fishing plan and creation of a fishing fleet register, which are priorities, had been accomplished in part. However, inspection capacity needed to be stepped up.

Assessment (October 2002)

Progress has been limited. The Fisheries Information System, and structural and market policies will have to be put in place. At the same time, efforts will have to be made to improve administrative capacity and strengthen coordination between the different Ministries responsible for fisheries. Otherwise, preparation of legislation on markets, fisheries registers and producers’ organisations is well under way.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 98/264/EC of 30.3.1998
Official Journal L 121, 23.04.1998

Decision 1999/855/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2006 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999) 504 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2000) 704 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1747/2
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1403
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1201
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.