Tag Archives: Enlargement of the European Union

Enlargement strategy 2009-2010

Enlargement strategy 2009-2010

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Enlargement strategy 2009-2010

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > The stabilisation and association process: the western balkans

Enlargement strategy 2009-2010

This Communication sets out the progress made and the reforms to be implemented by countries engaged in the European Union (EU)’s enlargement process. It also presents the European Commission’s priorities in supporting these countries’ efforts.

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament –Enlargement Strategy and Main Challenges 2009-2010 [COM(2009) 533 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Candidates and potential candidates for European Union (EU) membership have been affected by the international economic crisis. However, their economic and fiscal stability has been maintained through reforms supported by the enlargement process.

The situation of candidates for membership

Turkey has made progress in new areas. In particular, at national level, the Government has launched an initiative concerning the rights of the Kurdish minority. Nevertheless, the country should make further efforts to improve the safeguarding of fundamental rights (for example concerning the press, trade unions and women) and to control the army through civil institutions.

At external level, the country participates in negotiations under the auspices of the UN in order to resolve the Cypriot conflict. In 2009, Turkey contributed to stabilisation initiatives concerning the Middle East and the Southern Caucasus. The country has also signed an agreement on the construction of the Nabucco gas pipeline which should contribute to a secure energy supply in Europe.

Croatia has made steady progress. Accession negotiations could be concluded in 2010 if the country continues with reforms according to the planned timetable. Croatia also has to resolve its border issue with Slovenia.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia has made progress in its reforms. The country has made particular efforts in the areas of democracy, justice and the fight against corruption. Discussions have also taken place under the auspices of the United Nations (UN) in order to resolve this country’s border issue with Greece.

The situation of potential candidates for membership

Bosnia and Herzegovina has not made sufficient progress at political level, in particular due to the unstable political climate and the unsatisfactory functioning of institutions. In view of this situation, the European presence in the country has been strengthened. Furthermore, the country was strongly affected by the crisis and turned to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for assistance.

In Kosovo, stability has been maintained but remains fragile. The European EULEX Mission has therefore been deployed throughout the territory. In addition, progress should be made to improve the functioning of justice and the administration, as well as to reconcile the different communities in the country. Finally, European financial aid has been increased since 2008, and EUR 500 million was earmarked for the country for the years 2007-2010.

Reforms in Montenegro have progressed at political and democratic levels. However, shortcomings in the judiciary and in administrative capacity still remain. Moreover, the country concluded an agreement with Croatia to resolve the border issue between them.

Serbia should continue its reforms, particularly with regard to the economy. In addition, the country requested specific assistance from the EU and the IMF to recover from the economic crisis. The country should also improve its relations with Kosovo. Administrative capacity has been improved. Furthermore, the country is cooperating in a satisfactory manner with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), but some war criminals have still not been arrested.

In 2009, the European Union received two new applications for membership from Albania and Iceland.

Albania has made satisfactory progress. Parliamentary elections organised in 2009 met with international standards. However, efforts are still required to guarantee the smooth functioning of the judiciary.

Iceland applied for membership in July 2009, in particular due to the financial crisis which has strongly affected it. This country is thoroughly integrated in the European internal market: it participates in the European Economic Area (EEA) and the Schengen Area.

Priorities of the 2009 – 2010 strategy

In order to foster economic recovery following the international financial crisis, the enlargement process supports the adoption of:

  • short term measures to fight unemployment and poverty;
  • medium-term measures to strengthen the stability of public finances and fiscal policies on the one hand, and to improve social protection and increase investment on the other.

In this context, European aid amounts to EUR 200 million in the form of grants, under the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA). The aid aims at strengthening:

  • the banking sector,
  • infrastructures,
  • small and medium-sized enterprises,
  • employment, particularly in rural areas.

The development of the rule of law and good governance is an essential priority for the EU. In 2009, EUR 80 million of IPA assistance were allocated for strengthening the judiciary and administration of partner countries.

Candidate countries should resolve conflicts with neighbours and maintain good relations with neighbouring States.

Increased regional cooperation is essential for economic development in the Balkans. In this regard, progress has been made in the areas of energy and transport. The Commission encourages cooperation under the South East European Cooperation Process.

Priorities for the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance (IPA)

The IPA has a budget of EUR 1.5 billion for the period 2009 – 2010. As a priority it finances:

  • the visa liberalisation regime for the Western Balkans, which is being completed in line with commitments under the Thessaloniki Agenda. All of the agreements aimed at facilitating the granting of visas and the readmission of persons residing without authorisation to their State have entered into force. In this spirit, the Commission has proposed a visa-free regime, applicable by 2010, for citizens from the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia;
  • the improvement of the quality of the pre-accession process through regular political dialogue and the monitoring of partners’ reforms;
  • the inclusion of civil society and administrations in the enlargement process to facilitate, in particular, their participation in EU agencies and programmes;
  • the fight against climate change, in particular by establishing the Regional Environmental Network for Accession (RENA) and by funding projects aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions;
  • improving communication about the enlargement process, directed at the populations of partner countries and European Union countries.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Research and new technologies

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Research and new technologies

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Research and new technologies

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Research and innovation > Research and innovation: international dimension and enlargement

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Research and new technologies

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report outlines progress, particularly in implementing the 2011-2020 Strategy. However, the administrative capacities remain limited.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

Due to its specificity, the acquis in the field of science and research does not require any transposition in the national legal order. Implementation capacity does not relate to the application and enforcement of legal provisions but rather to the existence of the necessary conditions for effective participation in the framework programmes. In order to ensure the successful implementation of the acquis in this domain, notably successful association to the framework programmes, Turkey will need to create the necessary implementing capacities in the field of research and technological development including an increase of the personnel assigned to framework programme activities.

The acquis in the field of telecommunications is aimed at the elimination of obstacles to the effective operation of the single market in telecommunications services and networks, and the deployment of universally available modern services. A new regulatory framework on electronic communications was adopted by the European Union (EU) in 2002. As regards postal services, the objective is to implement the single market by opening up the sector to competition in a gradual and controlled way, within a regulatory framework which assures a universal service.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Concerning European standards on science and research progress was noted. The national strategy for 2011 – 2020 was adopted. The participation rate in the Seventh EU Framework Research Programme has further increased. The administrative capacity to support participation in the framework programmes is weak.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report notes an increase in the level of participation in EU programmes on research matters. However, the capacities of research institutes need to be strengthened, and also their cooperation with industry.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report notes significant progress in the area of electronic communications. The sector is more competitive. However, the financial situation of the Broadcasting Council and the Public Service Broadcaster is to be improved.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia received the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

The 2011 Report outlines satisfactory progress, in particular the enactment of new framework-legislation. However, the efficiency of the internal market must be improved.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

European energy policy objectives include the improvement of competitiveness, security of energy supplies and the protection of the environment. The energy acquis consists of rules and policies, notably regarding competition and State aid (including in the coal sector), the internal energy market (for example, opening up of the electricity and gas markets, promotion of renewable energy sources, crisis management and oil stock security obligations), energy efficiency, nuclear energy and radiation protection.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Good progress was made in the energy sector, in particular the enactment of the new framework legislation and the resolution of the long-standing dispute with the distribution system operator, a major EU investor. An effectively functioning electricity market has yet to be established, and conditions for competition ensured. The financial independence of the radiation protection regulator is still not secured.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
Despite the progress made by the country, the 2010 report highlights the need to complete the legislation and to achieve energy price rationalisation.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report highlights progress made in the energy sector concerning, in particular, the transposition of legislation and the liberalisation of the electricity market. Some weaknesses still remain, in particular in terms of electricity prices and distribution. The energy sector is not yet completely independent and the country is not yet sufficiently well prepared.

Turkey – Employment and social policy

Turkey – Employment and social policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Turkey – Employment and social policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Employment and social policy > Employment and social policy: international dimension and enlargement

Turkey – Employment and social policy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM (2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The 2011 Report notes limited progress in the area of employment and social policy. Although constitutional changes have been made, the granting of full trade union rights is still not guaranteed. Undeclared work and that of women remain a source for concern.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The acquis in the social field includes minimum standards in areas such as labour law, equal treatment of women and men, health and safety at work and anti-discrimination. The European Social Fund (ESF) is the main financial tool through which the EU supports the implementation of its Employment Strategy and contributes to social inclusion efforts in the fight against social exclusion (implementation rules are covered under Chapter 22, which deals with all structural instruments). The Member States participate in social dialogue at European level and in EU policy processes in the areas of employment policy, social inclusion and social protection.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Turkey made limited progress in the field of social policy and employment. Administrative capacity showed some improvement. Constitutional amendments regarding trade union rights have not resulted in further changes of the legislation aimed at granting full trade union rights in line with EU standards and ILO conventions. The reduction of large-scale undeclared work and the increase of female employment rates are still matters of concern. The scope of the labour law remains limited. Enforcement of health and safety at work legislation needs to be stepped up. The risk of poverty remains very high, especially for the rural population and for children. Legislation establishing an equality body has not yet been adopted.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2010 Report highlighted the progress made by Turkey in the field of social policy and employment. However, alignment with the European social acquis remained limited. Reforms needed to continue in the areas of health and safety at work, trade union law and the fight against poverty.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2009 Report noted limited progress. The legislation on labour law, discrimination, health and safety at work had not yet been aligned with European standards. However, there had been good progress on the preparations for the introduction of the European Social Fund in the country. The establishment of the Parliamentary Commission on Equal Opportunities for Men and Women also constituted progress. The country had to take appropriate action to reduce unemployment and to combat poverty.

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2008 Report noted that Turkey still needed to make progress despite the adoption of a package of political measures in employment, social protection law and a social security system. The Joint Assessment Paper on priorities in employment and the Joint Inclusion Memorandum on inclusion were still to be finalized.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1436 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2007 Report highlighted the efforts necessary to promote gender equality and to strengthen administrative capacity.

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1390 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2006 Report noted the progress made, particularly with regard to social protection and the implementation of a new law on people with disabilities.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1426 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2005 Report noted changes in the fields of labour law and health and safety at work. The Turkish authorities had started working on the Joint Assessment Paper of Employment Policy Priorities (JAP) and the Joint Inclusion Memorandum (JIM) to combat social exclusion. The administrative capacity of the Ministry of Labour had also been strengthened.

Commission Report [COM(2004) 656 final – SEC(2004) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2004 Report noted that the process of alignment was still incomplete. Progress was needed to improve the health of the population and to make promoting social inclusion a priority.

Commission Report [COM(2003) 676 final – SEC(2003) 1212 – Not published in Official Journal].
The 2003 Report emphasised that, although the process of alignment on Community law had begun, particularly labour law, a great deal nevertheless remained to be done on social dialogue, social protection, promoting social inclusion and public health.

Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1412 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1756 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2000) 713 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2000 Report noted that Turkey had much to do as regards transposing Community acquis in the areas of employment and social affairs.

Commission Report [COM(1999) 513 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(1998) 711 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Turkey– Taxation

Turkey– Taxation

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Turkey– Taxation

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Taxation

Turkey– Taxation

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The 2011 Report notes limited progress in terms of legislative alignment. The European Commission observes no advancement on direct taxation matters.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The acquis on taxation essentially covers the area of indirect taxation, which comprises VAT (value-added tax) and excise duties. It lays down scope, definitions and principles for VAT. Excise duties on energy products, tobacco products and alcoholic beverages are regulated by EU legislation. With regard to direct taxation, the acquis covers some aspects of the taxation of individuals’ savings and corporate taxes. Furthermore, Member States are required to comply with the principles of the code of conduct relating to corporate taxes, which seeks to abolish harmful tax measures. Administrative cooperation and mutual assistance between Member States aims at ensuring the smooth running of the internal market in the field of taxation and provides instruments for preventing intra-Community fraud and tax evasion. Member States must ensure that they have the necessary implementation capacities, specifically connectivity with the EU’s IT taxation systems.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

On taxation, there has been limited progress on legislative alignment, particularly towards eliminating some discriminatory practices in the taxation of tobacco. The increase in excise duty on spirits contradicts the Action plan agreed with the Commission on that issue. Abolition of discriminatory practices in taxation is key to making further progress in this chapter. No progress can be reported on direct taxation.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final –SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
In the 2010 Report the Commission regretted the limited level of alignment on taxation matters, but also highlighted the improvement in the running of taxation institutions. Particular effort was required to ensure efficient financial controls.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2008 Report indicated that alignment of legislation in this area had not progressed very far. However, the Report highlighted some progress with regard to the modernisation of the tax administration.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1436 –Not published in the Official Journal.

In its 2007 Report, the Commission found that new progress had been made, but that full alignment was still not a reality. Discriminatory practices still persisted in certain areas, such as alcoholic products and tobacco. Furthermore, administrative capacity needed strengthening.

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1390 –Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2006 Report noted that limited progress has been made in the area of taxation. It stated that further efforts would be required to achieve alignment with the acquis, especially as regards the scope and rates of VAT, the structure and rates of excise duties, and direct taxation.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1426 –Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2005 Report noted that Turkey still needed to take substantial steps to achieve alignment with the acquis, particularly as regards the scope and rate of VAT, the structure and rate of excise duties, and direct taxation. Turkish tax legislation still contained discriminatory measures and administrative capacity remained weak.

Commission Report [COM(2004) 656 final – SEC(2004) 1201 –Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2004 Report noted limited progress in the area of indirect taxation but no progress on direct taxation or administrative cooperation. Overall, the Turkish tax regime remained partly aligned with the acquis, and important efforts still needed to be made in all areas under that chapter. Alignment was particularly necessary with regard to VAT, the scope of exempt transactions and applied rates. With regard to taxation, excise duties ought not to penalise imported products. Administrative capacity also needed to be substantially strengthened, in particular to improve tax collection.

Commission Report [COM(2003) 676 final – SEC(2003) 1212 –Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2003 Report found that Turkey had made limited progress in terms of both legislation and tax administration capacity.

Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1412 –Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2002 Report stated that Turkey had made substantial progress in aligning its tax legislation with the acquis in the area of indirect taxation.

Commission Report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1756 –Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2001 Report considered that Turkey had moved forward, particularly with regard to excise duties. In fact, the level of duties was higher than the minimum rate applied in the European Community (EC) to all fuels. As regards direct taxation, the tax system applicable to mergers, divisions and transfers of shares as well as the capital gains rules were now in line with the acquis. As far as administrative capacity was concerned, the implementation of a personal identification number for tax purposes was aimed at improving the collection of tax.

Commission Report [COM(2000) 713 final –Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2000 Report noted that very little progress had been made in the area of taxation since the last evaluation.

Commission Report [COM(1999) 513 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(1998) 711 final –Not published in the Official Journal].

Turkey – Transport

Turkey – Transport

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Turkey – Transport

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > International dimension and enlargement

Turkey – Transport

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The 2011 Report identifies progress made on transport matters, except in the railway sector. In the air transport sector, air safety remains compromised by the lack of communication between air traffic control centres in Turkey and the Republic of Cyprus.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU transport legislation aims at improving the functioning of the internal market by promoting safe, efficient and environment- and user-friendly transport services. The transport acquis covers the sectors of road transport, railways, aviation, maritime transport and inland waterways. It covers technical and safety standards, social conditions, the monitoring of state aid and market liberalisation in the context of the internal transport market.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Some progress has been achieved in alignment of the transport
sector, except for the railway sector. Alignment in maritime and land transport remains at an advanced level and air transport is following at a slower pace. The lack of communications between air traffic control centres in Turkey and the Republic of Cyprus continues to seriously compromise air safety. In the maritime sector, the Voluntary IMO Member State Audit Scheme is expected to create positive results for becoming a party to international conventions. The implementation capacity is limited, particularly for dangerous goods in land and maritime transport. Turkey has made progress in the area of Trans-European networks, in particular in the TEN transport area. Further efforts are needed as regards reliable transport data. There is also some progress to report in the TEN energy area.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its 2010 Report, the Commission noted improvements made by Turkey in order to align its legislation with the acquis in the fields of aviation, maritime transport and road transport. The country needed to continue in this direction, particularly with a view to improving rail market opening and safety.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 Report noted limited progress, although alignment of legislation had progressed well in the road transport sector. Considerable efforts had still to be made in the area of road safety. Moreover, the country was still not a party to international agreements on air and maritime transport.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1436 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

In its November 2007 Report, the Commission reported uneven progress. While the road sector was partly in line with the acquis, no progress could be reported in the rail sector. As for the areas of maritime and air transport, Turkey was still not a full party to all relevant international conventions. The question of risks for aviation safety and that of restrictions on the free movement of goods had not yet been resolved.

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1390 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2006 Report noted that legislative alignment was fairly advanced in the area of road transport, but uneven in the other sectors. Decisions on the structure of the railway sector were still outstanding. In the areas of maritime and air transport, the adoption of international agreements was not complemented by the transposition of the relevant acquis. Turkey had not removed all restrictions on the free movement of goods, including restrictions on the means of transport.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1426 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2005 Report noted the first real progress in aligning legislation and boosting Turkey’s administrative capacities in the transport sector. However, further efforts were needed to transpose and fully implement the acquis. This was particularly true of the rail, air and maritime sectors, in which the competent administrations needed to become more autonomous and effective. Lastly, Turkey needed to lift restrictions on the free circulation of goods affecting certain means of transport.

Commission Report [COM(2004) 656 final – SEC(2004) 1201 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The October 2004 Report noted that alignment of Turkish legislation with the Community transport acquis remained limited. Legislative and institutional reforms were needed to restructure the entire rail sector in line with the acquis. Besides the need for further legislative alignment, due emphasis should be given to the capacity to introduce competent administrations, in particular in the road transport sector.

Commission Report [COM(2003) 676 final – SEC(2003) 1212 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2003 Report indicated that Turkey had made limited progress in transposing the transport acquis. Alignment of the legislation with the Community transport acquis remained very limited, and calls for the adoption of action plans remained unheeded. Legislative alignment with the acquis should start on maritime safety, as well as on road and rail transport.

Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1412 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The October 2002 Report noted that progress had been limited. Turkey needed to focus further efforts on bringing its legislation into line with the Community transport acquis in all transport sectors. However, legislative preparation also needed to be accompanied by the means to implement and enforce the acquis.

Commission Report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1756 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2001 Report emphasised that Turkey needed to step up its legislative work considerably to adopt the Community transport acquis.

Commission Report [COM(2000) 713 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its November 2000 Report, the Commission noted that no new legislation transposing the Community transport acquis had been adopted since the last regular report.

Commission Report [COM(1999) 513 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(1998) 711 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Croatia – Competition

Croatia – Competition

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Croatia – Competition

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Competition > Competition: international dimension and enlargement

Croatia – Competition

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1326 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Commission indicates in its 2010 Report that significant progress has been achieved, particularly to benefit of shipyards. The country must now reform its legislation on cartels and improve the rules of competition in the broadcasting sector and steel and iron industry.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The competition legislation covers both anti-trust and State aid control policies. It includes rules and procedures to fight anti-competitive behaviour by companies (restrictive agreements between undertakings and abuse of dominant position), and to prevent governments from granting state aid which distorts competition in the Internal Market. Generally, the competition rules are directly applicable in the whole Union, and Member States must fully cooperate with the Commission on the enforcement of theses rules.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Significant progress has been achieved in competition policy, in particular towards finalisation of the tendering procedure for restructuring the shipyards. Overall, a good level of alignment has been achieved.

However, further efforts are still required to adopt restructuring plans in line with the State aid acquis for the shipyards in difficulty, to improve the Croatian Competition Agency’s enforcement record against cartels and to improve its administrative capacity further, in particular in the area of antitrust. Alignment of the Croatian Broadcasting Act needs to be completed.

The National Restructuring Plans for the steel industry also need updating.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1333 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2694 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The report of November 2008 noted some essential progress as regards State aid in the steel sector. Significant efforts were still required both as regards aid for the restructuring of shipyards, anti-trust and mergers.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1431 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The report of November 2007 noted progress in the area of State aid, but that progress in the area of anti-trust, and particularly merger control, remained limited.

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1385 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The report of November 2006 notes Croatia’s progress both as regards anti-trust and State aid, but highlights the work that still remains to be done.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1424 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The report of November 2005 noted some progress in the area of competition. However, Croatia should step up its efforts as regards legislative alignment, implementation of legislation and its administrative capacities.

Commission Opinion [COM(2004) 257 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its opinion of April 2004, the European Commission considered that it was essential for Croatia to make considerable and sustained efforts to align its competition legislation with the body of EU legislation and to implement this legislation effectively.