Tag Archives: Educational institution

Concrete future objectives of education systems

Concrete future objectives of education systems

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Concrete future objectives of education systems

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Concrete future objectives of education systems

Document or Iniciative

Report from the Commission of 31 January 2001: The concrete future objectives of education systems [COM(2001) 59 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

Summary

On the basis of the Member States’ contributions, the Commission and the Council set out a number of joint objectives for the future and defined how education and training systems should contribute to achieving the strategic goal set in Lisbon. This is the first document which outlines a comprehensive and consistent approach for national policies on education in the context of the European Union. The approach is based on three objectives:

The Council focused its attention on the three objectives below.

Objective 1: Improving the quality of education and training systems

Education and training are an excellent means of social and cultural cohesion and a considerable economic asset with a view to making Europe a more competitive and dynamic society. It is necessary to improve the quality of training for teachers and trainers and make a special effort to acquire the basic skills, which must be updated in order to keep pace with changes in the knowledge society. Literacy and numeracy also need to be improved, particularly with regard to information and communication technologies and general skills (e.g. learning to learn, teamwork, etc.). Improving the quality of facilities in schools and training institutes by making the best use of resources is a further priority, as is increasing recruitment in scientific and technical fields, such as mathematics and natural sciences, in order to ensure that Europe remains competitive in the future economy. Finally, raising the quality of education and training systems means better matching of resources and needs, and enabling schools to develop new partnerships to support their new, wider role.

For the first objective, the following results are to be pursued:

  • ensure that all education and training institutions have access to the Internet and to multimedia resources by the end of 2001;
  • take steps to ensure that all the teachers involved are qualified in the use of these technologies by the end of 2002;
  • bring about a substantial increase in per capita investment in human resources every year.

Objective 2: Making access to learning easier

The European model of social cohesion must be able to allow access for all to formal and non-formal education and training systems by making it easier to move from one part of the education system to another (e.g. from vocational education to higher education), from early childhood right through to later life. Opening up education and training systems and working to make these systems more attractive, and even adapting them to meet the needs of the various groups concerned, can play an important part in promoting active citizenship, equal opportunities and lasting social cohesion.

Objective 3: Opening education and training to the world

This objective involves building the European education and training area through mobility and foreign language teaching on the one hand and strengthening the links with the world of work, research and civil society as a whole on the other.

The following results are to be pursued:

  • promote training for entrepreneurs and self-employed workers;
  • encourage people to study two European Union languages in addition to their mother tongue(s) for a minimum of two consecutive years;
  • promote the mobility of students, teachers, trainers and researchers.

BACKGROUND

The new strategic goal for the European Union, which was set out at the Lisbon European Council of 23 and 24 March 2000, is to “become the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion”.

On the basis of a proposal from the Commission and contributions from the Member States, the Council adopted the current report. This report was approved in March 2001 by the Stockholm European Council, which asked for a detailed work programme to be prepared.

The Lisbon European Council recommended using the open method of coordination in order to achieve this new strategic goal. The open method of coordination, the most developed form of which is currently the Luxembourg process, consists of a coordinated strategy in which the Member States set common objectives and instruments.

Related Acts

Council Resolution of 19 December 2002 on the promotion of enhanced European cooperation in vocational education and training [Official Journal C 103 of 18.01.2003]

This Resolution seeks to promote enhanced European cooperation in vocational education and training in order to remove obstacles to occupational and geographic mobility and promote access to lifelong learning. To this end, the Council invites the Member States and the Commission to adopt measures to increase transparency and recognition of competences and qualifications within vocational education and training systems and to promote closer cooperation regarding quality in European vocational education and training systems as a sound basis for mutual trust. The Council also invites the Commission to submit a progress report as part of the report on the follow-up of the future objectives of education and training systems as requested by the European Council for its spring meeting of 2004.

Detailed work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of Education and training systems in Europe [Official Journal C 142/01 of 14.03.2002]

Report from the Commission – The concrete future objectives of education systems [COM(2001) 59 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

The Commission had identified five concrete objectives to work towards:

  • raising the standard of learning in Europe;
  • making access to learning easier and more widespread at all times of life;
  • updating the definition of basic skills for the knowledge society;
  • opening education and training to the local environment, Europe and the rest of the world;
  • making the best use of resources.

Orphan works

Orphan works

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Orphan works

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Businesses in the internal market > Intellectual property

Orphan works

Proposal

Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 May 2011 on certain permitted uses of orphan works [COM(2011) 289 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

This Proposal establishes a legal framework concerning orphan works * taking the form of:

  • books, journals, newspapers, magazines or other writings;
  • cinematographic or audiovisual works contained in the collections of film heritage institutions;
  • cinematographic, audio or audiovisual works belonging to the archives of public service broadcasting organisations.

It applies to all works which are protected by the Member States’ legislation in the field of copyright.

This Proposal defines the conditions governing the use of orphan works by:

  • publicly accessible libraries;
  • publicly accessible educational establishments;
  • publicly accessible museums;
  • archives;
  • film heritage institutions;
  • public service broadcasting organisations.

What are the parameters for identifying an orphan work?

The organisations referred to above are required to carry out a diligent search to identify and locate the copyright holder of a work through appropriate sources. These sources are determined by Member States, in consultation with rightholders and users. In particular, they may take the form of:

  • legal deposits;
  • databases of the relevant collecting societies;
  • indexes and catalogues from library holdings and collections;
  • publishers associations in the respective country.

The results of diligent searches must be recorded in a publicly accessible database.

Where the rightholders are not identified or located following a diligent search, a work is considered an orphan work and is recognised as such in all other Member States. The copyright holder nevertheless has the possibility of putting an end to the orphan status at any time.

What types of uses of orphan works are permitted?

Publicly accessible libraries, educational establishments and museums, archives, film heritage institutions and public service broadcasting organisations are obliged to use orphan works for a public interest purpose which includes activities such as:

  • the preservation and restoration of the works contained in their collection;
  • the provision of cultural and educational access to those works.

Organisations are obliged to maintain records of diligent searches carried out and publicly accessible records of their use of orphan works.

However, these organisations may be authorised by Member States to use an orphan work for a purpose other than that of the public interest, provided they remunerate rightholders who put an end to the work’s orphan status.

Context

This Proposal follows the Recommendation on the online digitisation of cultural heritage published in 2006 which invited Member States to equip themselves with legislation on orphan works, an invitation that few of them took up. It is also in line with the objectives of the Digital Agenda for Europe.

Key terms of the Act
  • Orphan work: a work whose rightholder has not been identified or, even if identified, has not been located after a diligent search for the rightholder has been carried out and recorded.

Reference

Proposal Official Journal Procedure

COM(2011) 289

2011/0136/COD


Another Normative about Orphan works

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Information society > Data protection copyright and related rights

Orphan works

Proposal

Proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 May 2011 on certain permitted uses of orphan works [COM(2011) 289 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

This Proposal establishes a legal framework concerning orphan works
* taking the form of:

  • books, journals, newspapers, magazines or other writings;
  • cinematographic or audiovisual works contained in the collections of film heritage institutions;
  • cinematographic, audio or audiovisual works belonging to the archives of public service broadcasting organisations.

It applies to all works which are protected by the Member States’ legislation in the field of copyright.

This Proposal defines the conditions governing the use of orphan works by:

  • publicly accessible libraries;
  • publicly accessible educational establishments;
  • publicly accessible museums;
  • archives;
  • film heritage institutions;
  • public service broadcasting organisations.

What are the parameters for identifying an orphan work?

The organisations referred to above are required to carry out a diligent search to identify and locate the copyright holder of a work through appropriate sources. These sources are determined by Member States, in consultation with rightholders and users. In particular, they may take the form of:

  • legal deposits;
  • databases of the relevant collecting societies;
  • indexes and catalogues from library holdings and collections;
  • publishers associations in the respective country.

The results of diligent searches must be recorded in a publicly accessible database.

Where the rightholders are not identified or located following a diligent search, a work is considered an orphan work and is recognised as such in all other Member States. The copyright holder nevertheless has the possibility of putting an end to the orphan status at any time.

What types of uses of orphan works are permitted?

Publicly accessible libraries, educational establishments and museums, archives, film heritage institutions and public service broadcasting organisations are obliged to use orphan works for a public interest purpose which includes activities such as:

  • the preservation and restoration of the works contained in their collection;
  • the provision of cultural and educational access to those works.

Organisations are obliged to maintain records of diligent searches carried out and publicly accessible records of their use of orphan works.

However, these organisations may be authorised by Member States to use an orphan work for a purpose other than that of the public interest, provided they remunerate rightholders who put an end to the work’s orphan status.

Context

This Proposal follows the Recommendation on the online digitisation of cultural heritage published in 2006 which invited Member States to equip themselves with legislation on orphan works, an invitation that few of them took up. It is also in line with the objectives of the Digital Agenda for Europe.

Key terms of the Act
  • Orphan work: a work whose rightholder has not been identified or, even if identified, has not been located after a diligent search for the rightholder has been carried out and recorded.

Reference

Proposal Official Journal Procedure

COM(2011) 289

2011/0136/COD