Tag Archives: Audiovisual industry

Media Mundus audiovisual cooperation programme with professionals from third countries 2011-2013

Media Mundus audiovisual cooperation programme with professionals from third countries 2011-2013

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Media Mundus audiovisual cooperation programme with professionals from third countries 2011-2013

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Audiovisual and media

Media Mundus audiovisual cooperation programme with professionals from third countries 2011-2013

Document or Iniciative

Decision No 1041/2009/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009 establishing an audiovisual cooperation programme with professionals from third countries (MEDIA Mundus).

Summary

This Decision aims at establishing the programme MEDIA Mundus for the funding of projects for international cooperation with professionals from third countries in the audiovisual sector during the period 2011-2013.

Scope

The programme is intended for professionals worldwide. However, the project coordinator must be resident in one of the following countries:

  • Member States;
  • EFTA States that are members of the EEA;
  • countries which declare a willingness to be members of the programme and pay a contribution calculated on the same basis as their contribution to the MEDIA 2007 programme.

What are the conditions for participation in the programme?

Projects proposed must fulfil the following conditions:

  • be carried out jointly by European and third-country professionals;
  • have a minimum of three partners with a view to creating an international network;
  • be coordinated by a European professional and include at least one partner from a third country.

What are the objectives of the programme?

The programme aims to increase the diversity and competitiveness of the European audiovisual industry and to promote Europe’s role in culture.

Information exchange, training and market intelligence

Under the programme, European and third-country professionals meet in order to enhance their understanding of their respective audiovisual markets, particularly in terms of operating conditions, legal frameworks, financing systems and possibilities for cooperation.

It involves establishing professional training on:

  • the conditions of production, co-production, distribution and the exhibition and dissemination of audiovisual works internationally;
  • the inclusion of new technologies throughout the value chain (production, post-production, distribution, marketing and archiving).

Competitiveness and distribution

The introduction of the programme should facilitate the search for foreign partners for European audiovisual works, whilst supporting the organisation of co-production markets.

Moreover, the programme should promote international sales of audiovisual works.

Distribution

At this level, the programme should:

  • improve the programming and exhibition conditions of audiovisual works in European and third-country cinemas;
  • improve broadcasting and distribution conditions for third countries’ audiovisual works on European distribution channels and European works on international distribution channels;
  • facilitate the organisation of events and initiatives, in particular aimed at young audiences.

What is the programme budget?

The financial allocation for implementing the programme throughout the 2011-2013 period is EUR 15 million (of which 13.5 million is dedicated to supporting projects).

Context

Prompted by the effects of the digital revolution on the conditions of production and dissemination of works, the audiovisual sector has changed significantly over the last 20 years, in particular from a technical standpoint. Furthermore, its international role is increasing with regard to the protection of cultural diversity. In this context, the public consultation on MEDIA Mundus demonstrated a willingness among European professionals and their third-country counterparts to cooperate so as to better promote the circulation of audiovisual works and film literacy.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Decision No 1041/2009/EC

24.11.2009

OJ L 288 of 4.11.2009

Related Acts

Council Decision 2010/478/EU of 26 July 2010 concerning the conclusion of an Agreement between the European Community and the Swiss Confederation in the audiovisual field, establishing the terms and conditions for the participation of the Swiss Confederation in the Community programme MEDIA 2007, and a Final Act [OJ L 234, 4.9.2010].

Media literacy in the digital environment

Media literacy in the digital environment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Media literacy in the digital environment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Audiovisual and media

Media literacy in the digital environment

Document or Iniciative

Commission Recommendation 2009/625/EC of 20 August 2009 on media literacy in the digital environment for a more competitive audiovisual and content industry and an inclusive knowledge society.

Summary

This Recommendation aims to increase media literacy in the digital environment in order to achieve a more competitive knowledge economy while contributing towards a more inclusive information society.

Definition

Media literacy is defined as the ability to access the media, and to understand and critically evaluate different aspects of the media and media content. Media literacy also includes the ability to communicate in a variety of contexts.

Barriers

There are still many barriers to the development of media literacy at European level. Member States still lack a shared vision in this area. In addition, the lack of visibility of national, regional and local initiatives in this area makes it more difficult to foster European networks. Consequently, for the moment, there is no coordination between stakeholders.

Challenges

Media literacy should enable European citizens to better understand and analyse the media messages and content they encounter and to acquire the skills which will enable them to play their role of citizen fully.

It may also contribute to safeguarding the pluralism and independence of the media. It permits the expression of diverse opinions from different social groups and promotes the development of the values of tolerance and dialogue.

Media literacy also plays an important role in enhancing awareness of the European audiovisual heritage and cultural identities. In fact, it helps to increase knowledge of and interest in recent European cultural works.

Faced with these challenges, the European Commission proposes encouraging research projects on media literacy in the framework of existing programmes.

Recommended action

Member States are invited to develop and implement co-regulatory initiatives leading to the adoption of codes of conduct relating to the European media.

It is important to promote and finance research, studies and projects covering the different aspects and dimensions of media literacy in the digital environment.

Member States are also encouraged to organise debates in conferences and public events with a view to the inclusion of media literacy in the education curriculum and as part of the provision of key competences for lifelong learning.

Member States should also implement national campaigns to raise public awareness of cultural heritage, as well as training to raise awareness of the risks involved in processing personal data through information and communication networks.

Moreover, the Media Industry is invited to suggest tools for improving the level of media literacy, such as:

  • information tools relating to digital content and search engines;
  • awareness-raising campaigns about techniques used for commercial communication purposes (product placement and online advertising);
  • information packs for young people on the processing of personal data;
  • information days on the creative economy and copyright.

Background

The Commission Communication of December 2007 on ‘A European approach to media literacy in the digital environment’ emphasised the importance of media literacy in relation to commercial communication, audiovisual works and digital content. A better level of media literacy would contribute towards the objectives that the European Union set for itself in Lisbon and in the context of the i2010 initiative.

Intellectual property rights: enhancing their enforcement

Intellectual property rights: enhancing their enforcement

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intellectual property rights: enhancing their enforcement

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Businesses in the internal market > Intellectual property

Intellectual property rights: enhancing their enforcement

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee of 11 September 2009 – Enhancing the enforcement of intellectual property rights in the internal market [COM(2009) 467 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

This Communication presents measures aimed at safeguarding intellectual property rights (IPR) and combating counterfeiting and piracy within the internal market.

European Observatory

The European Commission is establishing a European Observatory, the aim of which is to gather, monitor and report information and data related to IPR.

This Observatory requires collaboration between Member States and the private sector.

The main functions of the Observatory are:

  • the collection and use of independent, reliable information and data;
  • the dissemination of best practice amongst public authorities;
  • the dissemination of successful private sector strategies;
  • the assessment and identification of solutions for specific geographical areas.

The Observatory should be based on existing European Commission structures, and the Commission will provide the central administrative resource. It will however be possible, where necessary, to make use of external expertise.

The Commission has asked the Member States to appoint a national representative for the Observatory and has requested the participation of the private sector including a broad range of national and pan-European bodies representing the different economic sectors most involved in the fight against piracy and counterfeiting. European consumers are also represented and invited to play an active role.

Administrative cooperation across Europe

It is necessary to improve cross-border cooperation between different enforcement authorities in view of the international nature of IPR infringements.

Cooperation between the Commission and Member States should also be consolidated in the context of a borderless internal market. In this regard, the creation of a network of contact points across the European Union would be a relevant solution.

As the national centres of IPR expertise, National Intellectual Property Offices also have a role to play. They can contribute to developing strategic approaches and the dissemination of best practices.

National bodies should improve transparency in respect of the activities that they carry out in the field of IPR protection. The Commission, on the basis of information collected from Member States, is responsible for analysing the structures that Member States have put in place and drafting a report to map existing strategies, frameworks and best practices.

Stakeholders in European cooperation in the field of IPR should have access to an electronic network for the exchange of information on infringements that have been committed. This network will need to:

  • support ‘real-time’ exchanges of information on goods and services infringing IPR;
  • put in place an effective system of alerts concerning specific products or potential threats;
  • facilitate communication between the parties involved, particularly to overcome language barriers;
  • raise consumers’ awareness of the growing threat of counterfeiting and piracy and the associated risks.

Voluntary arrangements between stakeholders

The Commission wishes to encourage rights holders and the other parties involved to engage in dialogue and to share their common interests in combating IPR infringements. In this regard, voluntary arrangements seem to be the most appropriate solution, since this type of agreement allows for rapid adaptation to new technologies and may be extended beyond the European Union (EU).

The sale of counterfeit goods over the Internet has developed considerably in recent years. The Commission considers this sector as a priority for action where the method of dialogue and cooperation agreements could be applied effectively.

Brand owners and Internet companies alike have therefore committed themselves to developing a collaborative method. This involves a Memorandum of Understanding dealing with prevention, identification and removal of infringing offers and sellers from Internet platforms.

The Commission envisages legislative solutions if voluntary arrangements cannot be implemented.

Context

IPR infringements, particularly counterfeiting and piracy, cause widespread economic harm and even pose a threat to public health and consumer safety. The Commission therefore considers it necessary to protect IPR in order to foster economic growth, innovation and creativity.

Protecting children in the digital world

Protecting children in the digital world

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Protecting children in the digital world

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Information society > Internet Online activities and ICT standards

Protecting children in the digital world

Document or Iniciative

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 13 September 2011 on the application of the Council Recommendation of 24 September 1998 concerning the protection of minors and human dignity and of the Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 December 2006 on the protection of minors and human dignity and on the right of reply in relation to the competitiveness of the European audiovisual and online information services industry – Protecting children in the digital world [COM(2011) 556 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

This report outlines the measures put in place by Member States to protect children in online activities. It follows on from the 2006 Recommendation on protection of minors in audiovisual and information services, and the 1998 Recommendation on protection of minors and human dignity.

Illegal or harmful content

The report provides an overview of the initiatives taken by Member States aimed at combating discriminatory, illegal or harmful content online. It mainly concerns commitments and codes of conduct. For example, these provide for an appropriate label to be displayed on internet sites.

However, the level of protection assured by this type of initiative still varies from one Member State to another. Existing measures should be constantly monitored in order to ensure their effectiveness.

Furthermore, illegal or harmful content generally comes from other EU Member States or third countries. A coordinated approach at European and then international level would harmonise protection against this type of content.

Hotlines

The Digital Agenda for Europe provides for the installation of hotlines by 2013, enabling the reporting of offensive or harmful online content. These hotlines should benefit from co-financing from the Safer Internet programme. Furthermore, the Association of Internet Hotlines (INHOPE) is an effective cooperation tool for Member States and third countries. Notice and take-down procedures have also been put in place for internet service providers (ISPs) to take down any illegal content reported by a person using the hotline.

However, the Commission requests that Member States monitor their hotlines more closely. They are still not sufficiently known about by, and accessible to, Internet users and children.

Internet Service Providers (ISPs)

ISPs are requested to become more active in the protection of minors. The application of codes of conduct should be more widespread and closely monitored. ISP associations are encouraged to include the protection of minors in their actions and to ensure that their members are committed to this end. Moreover, greater involvement of consumers and authorities in the development of codes of conduct would help to ensure that self-regulation truly responds to the rapidly evolving digital world.

ISPs are encouraged to extend the application of the codes of conduct and to include the protection of minors in their mandates.

Social networking sites

Social networking sites have profoundly changed the behaviour of minors in the way that they interact and communicate with each other. These networking sites present many risks such as illegal content, age-inappropriate content, inappropriate contact and inappropriate conduct.

One of the ways detailed in the report for countering these risks may be the development of guidelines for providers of social networking sites. The Commission intends to increase the number of reporting points and to establish a well functioning back office infrastructure to be deployed on social networks.

Media literacy and awareness-raising

Member States are committed to increasing media literacy. There are several initiatives in this area, such as public-private partnerships and the EU kids onlineproject. However, although the integration of media literacy in schools has demonstrated positive results, universal coverage of all children and parents and consistency across schools and Member States remain significant challenges.

Access restrictions to content

Limiting minors’ access to content involves establishing age rating and classification of content. There are currently classification systems for audiovisual content in place which are considered to be sufficient and effective by some Member States, while others deem they should be improved.

Technical systems such as filtering, age verification systems and parental control systems can be useful, but they cannot guarantee complete restriction of access to content by minors. Subscribers are increasingly better informed about the existence of filtering and verification systems, and age verification software. However, Member States remain divided on the use, relevance (with regard to right to information and risk of censorship), technical feasibility and reliability of technical systems. Moreover, they highlight the need for transparency as regards the inclusion of certain content in a ‘black list’ and the possibility of its removal.

While most Member States see scope for improving age rating and classification systems, there is as yet no consensus on a pan-European classification system for media content. This report encourages reflection upon innovative rating and classification systems in the sector of information and communication technologies (ICT).

Audiovisual Media Services

The Commission notes that on-demand television services are lagging behind with regard to co/self regulation services aimed at protecting minors from harmful content and concerning the technical means for offering children selected access to content on the Internet. Age classifications and transmission time restrictions should be highlighted for these types of audiovisual media services.

Video games

With the exception of Germany, all Member States use the Pan European Games Information System (PEGI) concerning the protection of minors as regards video games. This report considers it appropriate to increase the number of awareness-raising measures with the aim of prevention, particularly in schools. Moreover, progress is still needed to ensure compliance with age classifications in the sale of video games and to extend the application of systems such as PEGI to online games.