Tag Archives: AN

A new partnership with South-East Asia

A new partnership with South-East Asia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about A new partnership with South-East Asia

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Relations with third countries > Asia

A new partnership with South-East Asia

Document or Iniciative

Commission Communication on a new partnership with South-East Asia [COM(2003) 399 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

Summary

The Communication proposes that EU/South-East Asia relations should be further developed in line with the guidelines contained in the 2001 Communication on ‘ Europe and Asia, a Strategic Framework for Enhanced Partnerships ‘.

South-East Asia is defined as covering the association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) as a regional grouping consisting of 10 individual countries: Brunei Darussalam, Burma/Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, and East Timor, which is not yet a member of ASEAN.

The Communication identifies six strategic priorities:

  • supporting regional stability and the fight against terrorism;
  • promoting human rights, democratic principles and good governance;
  • mainstreaming justice and home affairs issues;
  • injecting a new dynamism into regional trade and investment relations;
  • continuing to support the development of less prosperous countries;
  • intensifying dialogue and cooperation in specific strategic sectors.

Reasons for enhancing relations

The EU and South-East Asia share stronger economic, political and security interests than ever before. The future will see a shift in the centre of gravity of the world economy to the Asia Pacific region, with ASEAN emerging as a key partner for trade and investment. ASEAN is also making efforts towards creating a regional economic space that will help attract foreign direct investment, e.g. the creation of the free-trade area in January 2003.

The two regions find themselves more dependent on one another in addressing global challenges and the EU therefore wishes to broaden its programme of cooperation with South-East Asia. The priorities remain poverty reduction and improving basic health and education services. The European Community has adopted a holistic approach that acknowledges the inter-relationship of different issues so as to address them in the best possible way.

The two regions also share common features and values, such as a preference for diversity, regional integration and a peaceful and rule-based multi-polar world with strong multilateral organisations.

Priorities

ASEAN was originally created as a mechanism for preventing crises and one of the EU’s priorities is also to contribute to supporting regional stability and the fight against terrorism. Through dialogue and other action, its role is to prevent conflict and foster peace and stability. In matters of political dialogue, the Commission believes that ASEM is the most appropriate framework to deal with global issues, while region-specific issues should be dealt with in the ASEAN context. In its opinion, the EU should also play a more active role in the ARF, the ASEAN Regional Forum. Although it actively supports the ASEAN integration process, it recognises that only the ASEAN countries can determine the rhythm of the process.

Support for regional cooperation is also designed to combat terrorism. In the opinion of the EU, action against terrorism not only involves security and public order measures but also political, social, economic and financial governance. It therefore encourages ASEAN to implement a comprehensive strategy, taking care to respect human rights and peaceful political opposition. The EU is also prepared to consider support to any country that requires its assistance for the implementation of UNSC resolution 1373 (on cooperation in the fight against terrorism) and other relevant UN conventions.

With a view to promoting human rights, democratic principles and good governance, the Commission believes that new agreements should all contain the ‘essential element’ clause. This clause stipulates that respect for fundamental human rights and democratic principles, as laid down in the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, underpins the internal and external policies of the parties and constitutes an essential element of the agreement. The parties may also decide to launch human rights-specific bilateral dialogues. Specific cooperation measures should be undertaken to support democratic structures, build the capacity of institutions, improve the rule of law and governance and strengthen civil society. Strengthening institutional and regulatory frameworks and fighting corruption are priorities in the area of good governance.

Another priority is to mainstream justice and home affairs issues in the EU’s external relations. Issues of migration, combating organised crime, trafficking in human beings, money laundering, illicit drugs, piracy and counterfeiting should be incorporated systematically into dialogues.

With a view to injecting a new dynamism into regional trade and investment relations, the Commission proposes a trade action plan, the Trans-Regional EU-ASEAN Trade Initiative (TREATI), which is set out in Annex II. This initiative paves the way for a possible free-trade agreement that should only come after the conclusion of the Doha Development Round and be subject to sufficient progress on regulatory convergence.

TREATI proposes that EU-ASEAN cooperation on trade issues should take place on a region-to-region basis and in a context of flexible cooperation. Bilateral dialogues on economic issues should be further supplemented by a dialogue mechanism involving at least two ASEAN countries. Close coordination on technical assistance and capacity-building would be required and each country would have to develop its own road-map setting out the stages and schedule for its participation in the various activities.

Continuing to support the development of less prosperous countries is another priority with poverty reduction as its main goal. The priority issues here are assisting poor countries in their integration in the world economy, governance and human rights, environment and forestry, justice and home affairs issues, the fight against terrorism, trade-related technical assistance, supporting the TREATI process and ASEAN’s integration process.

Assistance should be concentrated in a limited number of key areas, based on a sectoral approach, and involve actors from outside the public sector. The Commission will promote trilateral cooperation and twinning arrangements.

The Commission offers a list of sectors in which dialogue and cooperation need to be intensified. Both parties can choose sectors of genuine mutual interest and then opt for a regional or bilateral approach. These sectors and the present situation, specific issues identified and suggested lines of action for each one are described in Annex III. They are as follows:

  • economic and trade issues;
  • justice and home affairs issues;
  • science, technology, research and development;
  • higher education and culture;
  • energy;
  • transport;
  • the information society;
  • statistics.

Institutional framework and resources

The Commission proposes to revitalise ties with South-East Asia through the strengthening of bilateral relations since the renegotiation of the only existing regional agreement – dating from 1980 – is impossible owing to the EU common position on Burma/Myanmar, one of the members of ASEAN. The legal basis for cooperation is the 1992 Regulation on financial and technical assistance to, and economic cooperation with, the developing countries in Latin America and Asia.

For optimum use of the institutional framework (bilateral agreements, ARF, ASEM, etc.) and available resources, the Commission proposes an evaluation based on political and institutional feasibility, the achievement of maximum impact, demand from the region or the country and the best possible use of available resources. It puts forward options for optimising the institutional framework:

  • EU-ASEAN ministerial meetings for regional political dialogue;
  • ASEM summits, ministerial meetings and ARF ministerial meetings on global and security issues;
  • consultations between ASEAN and EC economic affairs ministers;
  • an official bilateral institutional framework for implementation of agreements.

Alternative options are proposed for the optimisation of resources:

  • taking advantage of the network of Commission delegations;
  • improving the quality and delivery of EC external assistance through better strategic programming;
  • looking for greater synergies between EIB and Commission operations.

A new visibility strategy

To counter the lack of mutual awareness, the Commission proposes a coordinated visibility campaign. Efforts should be intensified in the area of academic, scientific and cultural exchanges.

Related Acts

Council Conclusions of 26 January 2004

Animal by-products

Animal by-products

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal by-products

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal nutrition

Animal by-products

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 1069/2009 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009 laying down health rules as regards animal by-products and derived products not intended for human consumption and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002.

Summary

This Regulation facilitates the efficient management of animal by-products whilst maintaining the high level of protection that is currently in place against risks to public and animal health and to the environment.

Products concerned

This Regulation shall apply to:

  • animal by-products * and derived products * which are not intended for human consumption;
  • products intended for purposes other than human consumption:
    • products of animal origin which may be destined for human consumption;
    • raw materials for the production of products of animal origin.

End point in the manufacturing chain

This Regulation introduces the notion of an “end point” in the manufacturing of animal by-products, beyond which they are no longer subject to the rules governing this type of product, since potential risks have been eliminated. Instead, the general rules on product safety are to apply. As an example, where animal fat produced by an incinerating factory is processed and the product of that transformation is used to produce plastics, the probability that the final product might transmit a significant biological risk is very slight.

Essential guarantees for public and animal health

Products of animal origin may be used outside the food chain for various purposes: skins for leather production, powdered milk to feed animals, and blood products in diagnostic medical devices. Such by-products may be a vector of diseases affecting human beings or animals when they are used in animal feedingstuffs or to produce technical products.

This Regulation preserves the basic guarantees introduced in 2003 against such risks. In particular, it maintains:

  • a risk-based categorisation of animal by-products which determines whether they may be used as animal feedingstuffs, for the manufacture of technical products or for other purposes, or whether they must be destroyed;
  • an obligation for Member States and operators to ensure that animal by-products are collected and disposed of as soon as possible;
  • the exclusion of products that are unfit for hum an consumption from the feed chain for farmed animals; and lastly
  • a ban on feeding animals of one species with material derived from the same species (“intra-species recycling ban”).

A more coherent legal framework

Animal by-products are used to produce cosmetics, medicines and diagnostic medical devices. When they are used for the manufacture of such products, they are subject to other provisions of European law. Slaughterhouses, milk factories and other food establishments manufacturing animal by-products are already bound by European legislation on human food or animal feedingstuffs, and are the subject of inspections in this regard.

This Regulation aims at improving coherency between other provisions of European law and the health rules applying to animal by-products. The potential risks are tackled with respect to the appropriate legislation, which avoids operators being exposed to unnecessary constraints.

Being based on experience gained, this Regulation clarifies under which circumstances and in what way environmental legislation shall apply to operations involving animal by-products. This legislation applies for example where the spreading of manure as a fertiliser has effects on soil and the groundwater table.

Comitology

The current categorisation of animal by-products may now be amended by the Commission under the comitology procedure. Prior to any change, a scientific organisation such as the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) or the Scientific Committee for Consumer Products (SCCP) must assess the possible risks of a specific animal by-product for public and animal health.

Repeal

Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 shall be repealed with effect from 4 March 2011.

Key terms of the Act
  • Animal by-products: entire bodies or parts of animals, products of animal origin or other products obtained from animals, which are not intended for human consumption, including oocytes, embryos and semen.
  • Derived products: products obtained from one or more treatments, transformations or steps of processing of animal by-products.
Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 41/2009

10.2.2009

OJ L 16 of 21.1.2009

Animal welfare during transport

Animal welfare during transport

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal welfare during transport

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal welfare

Animal welfare during transport

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 of 22 December 2004 on the protection of animals during transport and related operations and amending Directives 64/432/EEC and 93/119/EC and Regulation (EC) No 1255/97.

Summary

The text sets out to regulate transport of live vertebrate animals within the European Union (EU) where such transport is carried out as part of an economic activity. The aim is to prevent injury or undue suffering to animals and to ensure that they have appropriate conditions that meet their needs.

This regulation strengthens existing legislation on animal welfare during transport by identifying the parties involved and their respective responsibilities, putting in place enhanced measures on authorisations and inspections and laying down stricter rules on transport.

The parties involved and their responsibilities

The regulation extends responsibility for animal welfare to all parties involved in the process, including operations before and after transport. All parties must ensure that they comply with the legislation when performing those operations in which they are involved.

The regulation applies to transporters (already covered by the old legislation), organisers, drivers and “keepers” (staff at assembly centres, markets and slaughterhouses, and farmers).

All parties involved and their staff must undergo appropriate training. In particular, drivers and attendants must possess a certificate of competence issued after they have completed a comprehensive training course on animal welfare during transport and passed an exam organised by an independent body designated by the competent authorities.

Authorisations and inspections

For all journeys exceeding 65 km, transporters must hold an authorisation issued by a competent authority in the Member State in which they are established or represented. To obtain this authorisation, applicants must demonstrate that they have sufficient and appropriate staff, equipment and operational procedures.

For long journeys (exceeding eight hours), applicants must also provide:

  • specific documents: certificates of competence for drivers and attendants, certificates of approval for the means of transport to be used, details of the procedures for tracing and recording vehicle movements, and contingency plans; and
  • proof that they use a satellite navigation system, from 1 January 2007 for new vehicles and from 2009 for older vehicles.

These authorisations are valid for five years. They are issued in a standard European format and recorded in an electronic database accessible to the authorities of all the Member States.

Transporters carrying out long journeys between Member States must also possess a journey log drawn up by the transport organiser using a standard format and which contains information relating to the journey (identification of the animals and the persons in charge of them, place of departure and of destination, checks carried out at various stages of the journey, etc.).

Checks must be carried out by the competent authorities at key stages of the journey, including at exit points and border inspection posts. In addition, supplementary checks may be carried out at any stage of the journey on a random or targeted basis.

When carrying out checks, the competent authority must verify the validity of the authorisations, the certificates of approval and competence and the information recorded in the journey log. The official veterinarian must also check the state of the animals and their fitness to continue the journey. In the case of transport by sea, the state and conformity of the transport vessel must also be checked.

Technical rules on animal transports

The regulation introduces stricter rules on journeys exceeding eight hours. These rules apply to both vehicles and animals.

The regulation provides that transport vehicles must be fitted with equipment of the highest quality, including a temperature monitoring system (mechanical ventilation, temperature recording, warning system fitted in the driver’s cabin), permanent access to drinking water and better conditions on livestock vessels (ventilation, watering devices, approval system, etc.).

The transport of certain animals is prohibited. This applies to very young animals (calves of less than 10 days, pigs of less than three weeks and lambs of less than a week), except where the journey does not exceed 100 km. The regulation also prohibits transport of females in the last stages of gestation and during the first week after giving birth.

In addition, the transport conditions for horses on long journeys are improved, notably through the obligation to use individual stalls.

The provisions on journey times and space allowances for animals, which were contained in the old legislation, have not been amended. In terms of journey times, the regulation provides for different times depending on the type of animal: unweaned animals, i.e. animals still drinking milk (nine hours of travel, followed by one hour’s rest to enable the animals to drink, followed by a further nine hours of travel), pigs (24 hours of travel, provided there is continuous access to water), horses (24 hours of travel, with access to water every eight hours), cattle, sheep and goats (14 hours of travel, followed by one hour’s rest to enable the animals to drink, followed by a further 14 hours of travel). The above sequences may be repeated provided the animals are unloaded, fed, watered and rested for at least 24 hours at an approved control post.

Context

The revision of the maximum journey times and the space allowances for animals (two areas which are unchanged in the new legislation) must be the subject of a new proposal to be submitted four years after the entry into force of the regulation at the latest and which takes into account the application of the new rules by the Member States.

This regulation repeals and replaces Directive 91/628/EEC with effect from 5 January 2007.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1/2005

25.1.2005
Date of application: 5.1.2007
(except Article 6(5): 5.1.2008)

OJ L 3 of 5.1.2005

Related Acts

Council Decision 2004/544/EC of 21 June 2004 on the signing of the European Convention for the protection of animals during international transport (as amended) [Official Journal L 241 of 13.7.2004].
The European Convention for the protection of animals during international transports first came into force in 1971. In 1995, the contracting parties decided to bring its provisions up to date to take account of scientific developments and experience acquired in this field. The amended Convention lays down detailed rules applicable to all animal species and which reflect successive amendments to EU legislation. At present, the 15 old EU Member States are all parties to the Convention, as are Cyprus, Iceland, Norway, Poland, the Czech Republic, Romania, Russia, Switzerland and Turkey.

Council Regulation (EC) No 1255/97 of 25 June 1997 concerning Community criteria for staging points and amending the route plan referred to in the Annex to Directive 91/628/EEC [Official Journal L 174 of 2.7.1997].
The European Union lays down common criteria applicable to control posts (or “staging points”) at which animals must be unloaded during long journeys. These rules aim to secure the health and welfare of the animals during such stops.

Animal welfare

Animal welfare

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal welfare

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal welfare

Animal welfare

The European Union recognises animals as sentient beings that deserve protection. Community legislation sets minimum requirements in order to spare animals from any unnecessary suffering in three main areas: farming, transport and slaughter. It also tackles other issues, such as animal experiments and the fur trade. The 2006-2010 action plan sets out the broad outlines for European intervention in this field, both within the EU and beyond its borders.

GENERAL STRATEGY

  • Action plan on animal welfare 2006-2010

LIVESTOCK FARMING

  • European Convention for the Protection of Animals kept for Farming Purposes
  • Protection of farmed animals
  • Protection of chickens kept for meat production
  • Protection of laying hens
  • The protection of pigs
  • Protection of calves intended for slaughter
  • The keeping of wild animals in zoos

TRANSPORT

  • Animal welfare during transport
  • Community standards on staging points

SLAUGHTER

  • European Convention on the protection of animals at the time of slaughter
  • Protection of animals at the time of killing

OTHER

  • Protection of laboratory animals
  • Cosmetic products (from 2013)
  • Cosmetic products (until 2013)
  • Ban on trade in cat and dog fur
  • Trade in seal products

Anti-fraud offices

Anti-fraud offices

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Anti-fraud offices

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Fight against fraud > Anti-fraud offices

Anti-fraud offices

The European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) is the core component of the fight against fraud. OLAF is part of the European Commission and conducts fraud investigations in all European Union (EU) countries and within the European institutions themselves. It can also conduct investigations in non-EU countries with which it has agreements.

  • European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF)
  • European Technical and Scientific Centre (ETSC)
  • Advisory Committee for the Coordination of Fraud Prevention (COCOLAF)
  • The Court of Auditors of the European Union

Animal health

Animal health

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal health

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal health

Animal health

In order to prevent and to combat diseases afflicting animals, the European Union has devised measures to limit the risks of outbreaks and the spread of these diseases and to eradicate them once they have been detected. This legislation complements the rules on veterinary checks and food hygiene, and includes general provisions on the surveillance, notification and treatment of infectious diseases and their vectors, and specific provisions for certain diseases such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), foot and mouth disease or bird flu. Rules applicable to animal medicines have also been established.

MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

  • European Union Animal Health Strategy (2007-2013)
  • Monitoring of zoonoses and zoonotic agents
  • Control of salmonella and other zoonotic agents
  • Notification of diseases
  • Community strategy against antimicrobial resistance

TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES (TSEs) AND BOVINE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES (BSEs)

  • Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs)
  • BSE: state of play in March 2003

FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE

  • The fight against foot-and-mouth disease

BLUETONGUE

  • Bluetongue

CLASSIC AND AFRICAN SWINE FEVERS

  • Control of classical swine fever
  • African swine fever

OTHER DISEASES

  • African horse sickness
  • Swine vesicular disease and other animal diseases
  • Avian influenza
  • Fight against Newcastle disease
  • Animal health requirements for aquaculture animals and products thereof
  • Control measures: fish diseases

VETERINARY MEDICINE

  • Community code relating to veterinary medicinal products
  • Preparation and marketing of medicated foodstuffs for animals

Animal by-products not intended for human consumption

Animal by-products not intended for human consumption

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal by-products not intended for human consumption

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal nutrition

Animal by-products not intended for human consumption

The food crises of the 1990s highlighted the part played by animal by-products not intended for human consumption in the spread of certain infectious diseases. Such by-products must be kept out of the food chain. This Regulation therefore establishes strict health rules for their use, so as to ensure a high level of health and safety. In particular, it prohibits intra-species recycling.

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 3 October 2002 laying down health rules concerning animal by-products not intended for human consumption [See amending acts].

Summary

Regulation (EC) No 178/2002 constitutes the cornerstone of the new European legislation on food safety. Adopting the “from farm to table” approach, it aims, by drawing on the latest scientific opinions, to guarantee a high standard of health and safety throughout the food chain.

Animal by-products are defined as the entire bodies or parts of bodies of animals or products of animal origin not intended for human consumption, including ova, embryos and sperm. They represent more than 15 million tonnes of meat, dairy products and other products, including manure . These materials are then disposed of or processed and re-used in many different sectors, including the cosmetics or pharmaceuticals sectors, as well as being used for other technical purposes.

Following the food crises of the 1990s, such as the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic, the role of these by-products in propagating transmissible animal diseases was brought to light. Composed of eight independent scientific experts, the Scientific Steering Committee then concluded that products derived from animals declared unfit for human consumption must not enter the food chain. Moreover, the administration to any animal of proteins obtained by processing carcasses of the same species – or cannibalism – may constitute an additional risk of disease propagation.

This Regulation sets out the measures to be implemented for the processing of animal by-products.

SCOPE

This Regulation lays down the health and surveillance rules applicable to:

  • the collection, transport, storage, handling, processing and use or disposal of animal by-products;
  • the placing on the market and, in certain specific cases, the export and transit of animal by-products and products derived therefrom.

It does not apply to:

  • raw petfood originating from retail shops;
  • liquid milk and colostrum used on the farm of origin;
  • entire bodies (or parts) of healthy wild animals, except for fish landed for commercial purposes and animals used to produce game trophies;
  • raw petfood for use on site, derived from animals slaughtered on the farm of origin for use as foodstuffs by the farmer and his family only, in accordance with national legislation;
  • catering waste, unless it is destined for animal consumption, it is destined for use in a biogas plant or for composting or it comes from means of transport operating internationally;
  • ova, embryoes and sperm intended for breeding purposes;
  • transit by sea or by air.

CLASSIFICATION OF ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS

Category 1 material

Category 1 material comprises the following animal by-products:

  • all body parts body, including hides and skins, of animals suspected of being infected by a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) or in which the presence of a TSE has been confirmed, animals killed in the context of TSE eradication measures, pet animals, zoo animals and circus animals, experimental animals, wild animals suspected of being infected with a communicable disease;
  • specified risk material as tissues likely to carry an infectious agent;
  • products derived from animals that have absorbed prohibited substances or substances containing products dangerous for the environment;
  • all animal material collected when treating waste water from category 1 processing plants and other premises in which specified risk material is removed;
  • catering waste from means of transport operating internationally;
  • mixtures of category 1 with category 2 and/or category 3 material.

Intermediate handling and storage of category 1 material must take place in approved intermediate establishments of the same category. Collected, transported and identified without delay, this material shall be:

  • directly disposed of as waste by incineration in an approved incineration plant;
  • processed in an approved plant by a specific method, in which case the resulting material shall be marked and finally disposed of as waste by incineration or co-incineration;
  • with the exclusion of material coming from carcasses of animals infected (or suspected of being infected) with a TSE, processed by a specific method in an approved plant, in which case the resultant material shall be marked and finally disposed of as waste by means of burial in an approved landfill;
  • in the case of catering waste, disposed of by burial in a landfill.

Category 2 material

Category 2 material comprises the following animal by-products:

  • manure and digestive tract content;
  • all animal materials other than those belonging to category 1 collected when treating waste water from slaughterhouses;
  • products of animal origin containing residues of veterinary drugs and contaminants in concentrations exceeding the Community limits;
  • products of animal origin, other than category 1 material, that are imported from third countries and fail to comply with the Community veterinary requirements;
  • animals other than category 1 that have not been slaughtered for human consumption;
  • mixtures of category 2 and category 3 material.

Except in the case of manure, the intermediate handling and storage of category 2 material must take place in approved intermediate establishments of the same category. Collected, transported and identified without delay, this material shall be:

  • directly disposed of as waste by incineration in an approved incineration plant;
  • processed in an approved plant by a specific method, in which case the resultant material shall be marked and finally disposed of as waste;
  • ensiled or composted in the case of material derived from fish;
  • in the case of manure, digestive tract content, milk and colostrum not presenting any risk of spreading a communicable disease, either a) used without processing as raw material in a biogas or composting plant or treated in a technical plant, or b) applied to land;
  • used in a technical plant to produce game trophies.

Category 3 material

Category 3 material comprises the following animal by-products:

  • parts of slaughtered animals which are fit for human consumption but are not intended for human consumption for commercial reasons;
  • parts of slaughtered animals which are rejected as unfit for human consumption but are not affected by any sign of a communicable disease;
  • hides and skins, hooves and horns, pig bristles and feathers originating from animals that are slaughtered in a slaughterhouse and were declared fit for human consumption after undergoing an ante mortem inspection;
  • blood obtained from animals declared fit for human consumption after undergoing an ante mortem inspection, other than ruminants slaughtered in a slaughterhouse;
  • animal by-products derived from the production of products intended for human consumption, including degreased bones and greaves;
  • former foodstuffs of animal origin, other than catering waste, which are no longer intended for human consumption for commercial reasons or due to problems of manufacturing or packaging defects;
  • raw milk originating from animals that do not show any signs of a communicable disease;
  • fish or other sea animals, except sea mammals, caught in the open sea for the purpose of fishmeal production, and fresh by-products from fish from plants manufacturing fish products for human consumption;
  • shells of eggs originating from animals that do not show any signs of a communicable disease;
  • blood, hides and skins, hooves, feathers, wool, horns, hair and fur originating from healthy animals;
  • catering waste other than category 1.

Intermediate handling and storage of category 3 material must take place in approved intermediate establishments of the same category. Collected, transported and identified without delay, this material shall be:

  • directly disposed of as waste by incineration in an approved incineration plant;
  • used as raw material in a petfood plant;
  • processed by a specific method in an approved processing, technical, biogas or composting plant;
  • composted or processed in a biogas plant in the case of category 3 catering waste;
  • in the case of raw material of fish origin, ensiled or composted.

COLLECTION, TRANSPORTATION, STORAGE, DISPATCH

With the exception of category 3 catering waste, animal by-products and processed products shall be collected, transported and identified. The regulatory procedure concerns identification and labelling of raw materials in the three categories, equipment of vehicles and containers, commercial documents, health certificates and transportation conditions. Records must be kept of all dispatches.

For the dispatch of animal by-products and processed products, the Member State of destination must have authorised the receipt of category 1 and 2 material and of processed animal proteins. Duly identified, any batch of animal by-products must be conveyed directly to the plant of destination. Information is exchanged between the Member States’ competent authorities via the TRACES system.

APPROVAL

Intermediate and storage establishments

Category 1, 2 and 3 intermediate and storage establishments shall be subject to approval by the competent authority. To be approved, they must meet the requirements of the Regulation aimed at preventing any risk of transmissible disease propagation.

Hygiene requirements relate to: the layout of premises, the type of facilities, staff hygiene, protection against pests (insects, rodents and birds), waste water disposal, storage temperature, cleaning and disinfection of containers and transport vehicles other than ships.

The competent authority must check these establishments regularly; in addition, intermediate establishments must apply specific own-check procedures. The competent authority shall suspend approval immediately if the conditions under which it was granted are no longer fulfilled.

Incineration and co-incineration plants

Directive 2000/76/EC defines the conditions for the incineration of waste from processed products. Where this Directive does not apply to certain animal by-products, they are disposed of in accordance with the present Regulation.

The competent authority shall approve high- and low-capacity plants. Used only for the disposal of pet animals, specified risk material and category 2 and/or category 3 material, low-capacity plants must meet strict requirements regarding the equipment and maintenance of premises, operating conditions (gaseous releases, temperature), waste water, residues (ash, slag, dust), temperature measurement and the conditions for incinerating specified risk material.

Approval shall be suspended immediately if the requirements in force are no longer met.

Category 1 and 2 processing plants

Category 1 and 2 processing plants shall be subject to approval by the competent authority, which validates and checks the manufacturing processes. To be approved, these plants must meet the requirements of the Regulation regarding: the layout of premises, the type of facilities, staff hygiene, protection against pests (insects, rodents and birds), waste water disposal, storage, cleaning and disinfection of the site and vehicles.

Depending on the category of animal by-products, seven processing methods may be used. Described in Annex V, these methods vary according to the particle size of the raw material, the temperature reached during heat treatment, the pressure applied and the duration of the process, one of them being specific to animal by-products of fish origin. Method No 1 shall be applied to:

  • category 2 material – other than manure, digestive tract content, milk and colostrum – destined for a biogas or composting plant or intended for use as organic fertilisers or soil improvers;
  • category 1 and 2 material to be disposed of in a landfill;
  • processed mammalian proteins.

The methods numbered from 1 to 5 are applied to:

  • category 2 raw material intended for incineration after processing;
  • category 1 and 2 material intended for incineration.

For each of the processing methods, identification of the critical points determining the intensity of heat treatment is essential. These critical points include: the particle size of the raw material, the temperature reached during heat treatment, the pressure applied and the duration of the process.

Approval shall be suspended immediately if the conditions under which it was granted are no longer fulfilled.

Category 3 processing plants

Category 3 processing plants shall be subject to approval by the competent authority. To be approved, these plants must meet the requirements regarding the layout of the premises, the type of facilities, hot water production capacity, heat treatment, protection against pests, waste water disposal, cleaning and disinfection of the site.

Only category 3 raw material – apart from blood, hides and skins, hooves, feathers, wool, horns, hair and fur of animals unfit for human consumption but not show any signs of a communicable disease, as well as catering waste – may be used for the production of processed animal proteins and other raw material for animal feed. Prior to any processing, the animal by-products must be subjected to a check to detect the presence of foreign bodies such as packaging material or pieces of metal.

For each of the processing methods used, the critical points determining the intensity of the heat treatment must be identified: particle size, temperature, pressure, duration of the process. Specific requirements are applicable, depending on whether the method involves processed animal proteins (e. g. method No 1 for mammalian proteins), blood products, rendered fats and fish oils, (products based on) milk and colostrum, gelatine and hydrolysed proteins, dicalcium or tricalcium phosphate.

The competent authority shall approve and inspect processing plants and shall suspend approval immediately if the requirements of the Regulation are no longer met. The plants must also introduce own-check procedures.

Category 2 and 3 oleochemical plants

Oleochemical plants shall be subject to approval by the competent authority. To be approved, these plants must process rendered fats derived from category 2 or 3 material in accordance with the standards laid down in the Regulation and establish and implement critical point monitoring and control methods. The authority shall inspect the plants and suspend approval if the conditions under which it was granted are no longer fulfilled.

Biogas and composting plants

Biogas and composting plants shall be subject to approval by the competent authority. The conditions for obtaining approval relate to the nature and equipment of the plants. In addition, these plants must implement critical point monitoring and control methods. Approval shall be suspended immediately if the conditions under which it was granted are no longer fulfilled.

Only the following animal by-products may be processed in a biogas or composting plant:

  • category 2 material subjected to processing method No 1 in a category 2 processing plant;
  • manure and digestive tract content separated from the digestive tract, milk and colostrum;
  • category 3 material.

There are specific hygiene and processing requirements for biogas and composting plants.

Petfood plants and technical plants

Plants producing petfood, articles for chewing and technical products shall be subject to control and approval by the competent authority.

The Regulation sets out the hygiene rules specific to:

  • petfood and articles for chewing;
  • manure;
  • blood and blood products;
  • serum from equidae;
  • hides and skins of ungulates;
  • game trophies;
  • wool;
  • unprocessed hair, unprocessed pig bristles, unprocessed feathers and parts of feathers;
  • apiculture products;
  • bones, horns, hooves intended for purposes other than as raw material for animal feed, organic fertilisers or soil improvers;
  • animal by-products intended for the manufacture of petfood, pharmaceuticals and other technical products;
  • rendered fats intended for an oleochemical use;
  • fat derivatives;
  • flavouring innards used in the manufacture of petfood.

The plants must establish and implement critical point monitoring and control methods on the basis of the process used. Depending on the products, they must take samples for laboratory analysis. The competent authority shall carry out checks and suspend approval if the conditions under which it was granted are no longer fulfilled.

PLACING ON THE MARKET AND USE OF PROCESSED PROTEINS

The Member States must be able to guarantee that animal by-products and processed products do not come from a geographical zone subject to health restrictions. In certain cases, animal by-products may originate from such a zone if they are neither infected nor suspected of being infected, are correctly identified and meet the hygiene requirements laid down in the Regulation.

Placing on the market and export of processed animal proteins used as feed material

Only animal proteins handled, processed, stored and transported in accordance with the provisions of the Regulation may be placed on the market. Produced in a category 3 processing plant, they must be prepared exclusively from material of the same category.

Placing on the market and export of petfood, articles for chewing and technical products

Only petfood, articles for chewing and technical products which meet the specific requirements of the Regulation and come from approved and inspected plants may be placed on the market.

Fat derivatives, placed on the market or exported, must be produced from category 2 or 3 material and prepared in an oleochemical plant; they must meet the requirements of the Regulation relating to processing and handling.

Safeguard measures

In the event of an outbreak of an epizootic disease that may constitute a risk to health, the Member State of dispatch must take – in accordance with the legislation in force – all necessary measures to eradicate the disease and, in particular, must demarcate the affected area. The Member State of destination must take the preventive measures laid down in Community legislation. These provisions apply to movements of animal by-products.

It is prohibited to:

  • feed a species with processed animal proteins derived from the bodies or parts of bodies of animals of the same species (cannibalism);
    Following a consultation of the Scientific Committee, which came out in favour, fish and fur animals are exempt from this ban.
  • feed farmed animals other than fur animals with catering waste;
  • apply organic fertilisers and soil improvers, other than manure, to pasture land.

DEROGATIONS

Derogations regarding the use of animal by-products

Under the supervision of the competent authority, the Member States may authorise the use of animal by-products for diagnostic, educational and research purposes, as well as for taxidermy purposes in approved technical plants.

Animal by-products derived from category 2 and 3 material – except for blood, hides and skins, hooves, feathers, wool, horns, hair and fur from animals unfit for human consumption but not showing any signs of a communicable disease – may be used for the feeding of the following animals:

  • zoo and circus animals;
  • reptiles and birds of prey;
  • fur animals;
  • wild animals the meat of which is not destineded for human consumption;
  • dogs from recognised kennels or packs of hounds;
  • maggots for fishing bait.

Following a consultation of the Scientific Committee, which expressed a favourable opinion, the Member States may authorise the use of entire bodies of category 1 animals containing specified risk material for the feeding of endangered or protected species of necrophagous birds (griffon vultures).

Member States must inform the Commission of the use made of the derogations and the verification arrangements introduced. They must draw up a list of authorised users and collection centres registered on their territory and assign them an official number.

Derogations regarding the disposal of animal by-products

The direct burial of dead pet animals is authorised only in limited cases.

Certain animal by-products originating in remote areas may be disposed of as waste by burning or burial on site. This concerns the bodies of pet animals and category 1 animals containing specified risk material, category 2 and 3 material originating in remote areas or animal by-products that can be burnt or buried on site in the event of an outbreak of a disease included in list A of the International Office for Epizootics (OIE).

No derogation may be granted for animals suspected of being infected with a TSE.

CONTROLS AND INSPECTIONS

Plants’ own checks

Operators and owners of intermediate establishments and processing plants must put in place a permanent procedure developed in accordance with the principles of the system of hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP). They must:

  • identify the critical points in order to establish a monitoring and control method;
  • in the case of a processing plant, take samples for analysis;
  • record the results of checks and tests and keep them for a period of at least two years;
  • introduce a system ensuring the traceability of each batch dispatched.

Where the results of a test on samples do not comply with the provisions of the Regulation, the operator of the plant must notify the competent authority immediately, establish the causes of failures of compliance, stop the dispatch of contaminated material, increase the frequency of testing of production and take appropriate steps to decontaminate the plant.

Official controls and lists of approved establishments and plants

The competent authority shall inspect approved establishments and plants at regular intervals. In the case of processing plants, the supervision of production covers the following:

  • general conditions of hygiene of the premises;
  • equipment and staff;
  • the efficacy of the own checks carried out by the plant;
  • the standards of the products after processing;
  • storage conditions;
  • description of the process;
  • identification of critical control points (CCP).

The frequency of inspections and supervision shall depend on the size of the establishments and plants, the type of products manufactured and the risk assessment in accordance with the principles of the HACCP system.

Each Member State shall draw up a list of the approved establishments and plants within its territory and assign them an official identification number. It shall sends copies of the list and updated versions to the Commission and the other Member States.

Community controls in the Member States

Experts from the Commission experts may make on-the-spot checks in cooperation with the competent authorities of the Member States. The Commission shall inform the Member State’s competent authority of the results of the checks made.

IMPORTATION AND TRANSIT OF CERTAIN ANIMAL BY-PRODUCTS

The provisions applicable to the importation of animal by-products from third countries shall provide equivalent guarantees to those applicable to the production and marketing of these products in the Community.

Imported products must come from a third country on an updated list which takes account of criteria relating to that country’s legislation and health situation. Similarly, establishments and plants producing for export to the European Union shall be approved by the competent authority in the third country and entered on a Community list. Pending the compilation of such lists, the Member States may maintain the controls provided for in Directive 97/78/EC.

A health certificate, which may be drawn up according to various models shown in the Regulation, shall identify the product and certify that it is safe.

Experts from the Commission may make on-the-spot checks with a view to drawing up the list of third countries and verifying compliance with import and/or transit conditions. The Commission shall meet the costs incurred for these checks. If a check reveals a serious infringement of the health rules, the Commission shall immediately ask the third country to take appropriate measures or shall suspend consignments to the Union and immediately inform the Member States.

According to the product concerned, the lists of third countries from which the Member States may authorise imports of animal by-products are given in Annex XI of the Regulation.

FINAL PROVISIONS

After consultation of the appropriate scientific committee on any question that could have an impact on animal health or public health, the Annexes may be amended or supplemented and any appropriate transitional measures may be adopted by a decision of the Commission.

The Commission shall be assisted by the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health and by the appropriate scientific committees.

National provisions

Within one year of the entry into force of the Regulation, the Member States shall communicate to the Commission the text of the provisions of any national law that they adopt in order to comply with the new Community provisions.

On the basis of the information received, the Commission shall submit to the European Parliament and the Council a detailed report accompanied, if appropriate, by legislative proposals. It shall also prepare a report on the financial arrangements in by the Member States for the processing, collection, storage and disposal of animal by-products.

The Member States may adopt or maintain more restrictive national rules concerning the use of organic fertilisers and soil improvers and of fat derivatives produced from category 2 raw material.

Repeal

Directive 90/667/EEC and Decisions 95/348/EC and 1999/534/EC shall be repealed with effect from six months after the entry into force of the Regulation.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 30.10.2002 OJ L 273 of 10.10.2002

DEROGATION

Decision 2003/324/EC [Official Journal L117 of 13.05.2003]

This derogation is granted to Finland and Estonia with regard to the intra-species recycling of fur animals (fox and raccoon dog) with processed animal protein derived from the bodies or parts of bodies of animals of the same species.

See consolidated version (pdf)

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 13.05.2003 OJ L 117 of 13.05.2003

Successive amendments and corrections to Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 have been incorporated into the original text. The consolidated version (pdf ) is intended purely as a documentation tool.

CHANGES TO THE ANNEXES

Annexe I – Specific definitions:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003];
Regulation (EC) No 668/2004 [Official Journal L 112 of 19.04.2004];
Regulation (EC) No 181/2006 [Official Journal L 29 of 2.2.2006];
Regulation (EC) No 829/2007 [Official Journal L 191 of 21.7.2007];
Regulation (EC) No 1432/2007 [Official Journal L 320 of 6.12.2007].

Regulation (EC) No 777/2008 [Official Journal L 207 of 5.8.2008].

Annexe II – Hygiene requirements for collection and transport:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 du 13.05.2003];
Regulation (EC) No 93/2005 [Official Journal L 19 du 21.01.2005].
Regulation (EC) No 829/2007 [Official Journal L 191 of 21.7.2007];
Regulation (EC) No 1432/2007 [Official Journal L 320 of 6.12.2007].

Annexe III – Hygiene requirements for intermediate and storage plants:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003].

Annexe IV – Requirements for incineration and co-incineration plants to which Directive 2000/76/EC does not apply:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003];

Annexe V – General hygiene requirements for the processing of category 1, 2 and 3 material:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003];
Regulation (EC) No 93/2005 [Official Journal L 19 of 21.01.2005].
Regulation (EC) No 777/2008 [Official Journal L 207 of 5.8.2008]

Annexe VI – Specific requirements for the processing of category 1 and 2 material and for the production of biogas, for composting as well as for the marking of certain processed products:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003];
Regulation (EC) No 208/2006 [Official Journal L 36 of 08.02.2006];
Regulation (EC) No 1432/2007 [Official Journal L 320 of 6.12.2007].

Annexe VII – Specific hygiene requirements for the processing and placing on the market of processed animal protein and other processed products that could be used as feed material:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003] ;
Regulation (EC) No 668/2004 [Official Journal L 112 of 19.04.2004].
Regulation (EC) No 829/2007 [Official Journal L 191 of 21.7.2007].
Regulation (EC) No 437/2008 [Official Journal L 132 of 22.5.2008].

Regulation (EC) No 777/2008 [Official Journal L 207 of 5.8.2008].

Annexe VIII – Requirements for the placing on the market of petfood, dogchews and technical products:
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003] ;
Regulation (EC) No 668/2004 [Official Journal L 112 of 19.04.2004];
Regulation (EC) No 208/2006 [Official Journal L 36 of 08.02.2006].
Regulation (EC) No 2007/2006 [Official Journal L 379 of 28.12.2006];
Regulation (EC) No 829/2007 [Official Journal L 191 of 21.7.2007].

Regulation (EC) No 399/2008 [Official Journal L 118 of 6.5.2008].

Regulation (EC) No 523/2008 [Official Journal L 153 of 12.6.2008].

Annexe IX – Rules applicable to the use of certain category 2 and category 3 material for the feeding of certain animals in accordance with Article 23(2):
Regulation (EC) No 808/2003 [Official Journal L 117 of 13.05.2003].

Annexe X – Model health certificates for the importation from third countries of certain animal by-products and products derived therefrom:
Regulation (EC) No 668/2004 [Official Journal L 112 of 19.04.2004].
Regulation (EC) No 2007/2006 [Official Journal L 379 of 28.12.2006];
Regulation (EC) No 829/2007 [Official Journal L 191 of 21.7.2007].

Regulation (EC) No 437/2008 [Official Journal L 132 of 22.5.2008].

Regulation (EC) No 523/2008 [Official Journal L 153 of 12.6.2008].

Annexe XI – List of third countries from which member states may authorise imports of animal by-products not intended for human consumption:
Regulation (EC) No 668/2004 [Official Journal L 112 of 19.04.2004];
Regulation (EC) No 416/2005 [Official Journal L 66 of 12.03.2005].
Regulation (EC) No 829/2007 [Official Journal L 191 of 21.7.2007].

Regulation (EC) No 437/2008 [Official Journal L 132 of 22.5.2008].

Regulation (EC) No 523/2008 [Official Journal L 153 of 12.6.2008].

Related Acts

PROPOSALS

Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down health rules as regards animal by-products not intended for human consumption (“Animal by-products Regulation”) [COM (2008) 345 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

In this proposal the basic framework of safeguards applicable to animal by-products (ABP) is maintained. Nevertheless, the regulations will be clarified and a more risk-based approach will be introduced. The proposal also aims to ensure that the health rules on ABP are consistent with other Community legislation. Finally this proposal specifies the circumstances and methods related to the implementation of environmental legislation and facilitates the use of materials of animal origin for technical uses.

Codecision Procedure (COD/2008/0110).

Commission Regulation (EC) No 1192/2006 of 4 August 2006 implementing Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards lists of approved plants in Member States [Official Journal L 215 of 5.8.2006].

Category 1 material

Commission Regulation (EC) No 92/2005 of 19 January 2005 implementing Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards means of disposal or uses of animal by-products and amending its Annex VI as regards biogas transformation and processing of rendered fats [Official Journal L 19 of 21.1.2005].

Commission Regulation (EC) No 811/2003 of 12 May 2003 implementing Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council as regards the intra-species recycling ban for fish, the burial and burning of animal by-products and certain transitional measures [Official Journal L 117 of 13.5.2003].

Commission Decision 2003/322/EC [Official Journal L 117 of 13.5.2003]

(Use of category 1 materials for the feeding of certain necrophagous birds)

See consolidated text (pdf ).

Category 3 material

Commission Regulation (EC) No 79/2005 [Official Journal L 16 of 20.1.2005]

(the use of milk, milk-based products and milk-derived products, defined as Category 3 material).

See consolidated version (pdf ).

TRANSITIONAL MEASURES

Commission Regulation (EC) No 197/2006 of 3 February 2006 on transitional measures under Regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 as regards the collection, transport, treatment, use and disposal of former foodstuffs [Official Journal L 32 of 4.2.2006].
Member States can authorise the collection, transport, treatment and use and disposal of former foodstuffs of animal origin or containing products of animal origin not intended for human consumption, which carry no risk for human or animal health. This transitional measure is valid until 31 July 2009.

Regulation (EC) No 878/2004 [Official Journal L 162 of 30.4.2004]

(importation and placing on the market of certain by-products from categories 1 and 2.

REPORTS

Report from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 21 October 2005 on the measures taken by Member States to ensure compliance with regulation (EC) No 1774/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 3 October 2002 laying down health rules concerning animal by-products not intended for human consumption [COM(2005) 521 – Official Journal C 49 of 28.02.2006].

 

Animal nutrition

Animal nutrition

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal nutrition

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal nutrition

Animal nutrition

The agrifood sector in the European Union produces around 120 million tonnes of animal feedingstuffs annually. Good quality animal nutrition is essential, as it affects animal health and consequently food safety. Legislation on labelling and the circulation of animal feedingstuffs has been supplemented so as to shift the emphasis more towards the protection of human and animal health. In addition to the rules on hygiene and the monitoring of animal feedingstuffs, the EU thus regulates certain substances and products in order to limit or even prohibit their presence in animal feedingstuffs.

MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

  • Feed hygiene
  • Undesirable substances in animal feed
  • Marketing of feed

OFFICIAL CONTROL OF ANIMAL FEEDINGSTUFFS

  • Official feed and food controls

ADDITIVES IN ANIMAL NUTRITION

  • Use of additives in feedingstuffs
  • Community strategy against antimicrobial resistance

TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

  • Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs)

GENETICALLY MODIFIED FEEDINGSTUFFS

  • Traceability and labelling of GMOs
  • Food and Feed (GMO)

ANIMAL WASTE AND PATHOGENIC AGENTS

  • Animal by-products
  • Animal by-products not intended for human consumption

OTHER FEEDINGSTUFFS

  • Preparation and marketing of medicated foodstuffs for animals
  • Animal nutrition: specifications on certain proteins

Animal nutrition: specifications on certain proteins

Animal nutrition: specifications on certain proteins

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Animal nutrition: specifications on certain proteins

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal nutrition

Animal nutrition: specifications on certain proteins

The European Union regulates the use of products manufactured by certain technical processes which act as direct or indirect protein sources and are put into circulation within the Community as feedingstuffs or in feedingstuffs.

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 82/471/EEC of 30 June 1982 concerning certain products used in animal nutrition [See amending acts].

Summary

The basic Directive concerns products manufactured by certain technical processes which act as direct or indirect protein sources and are put into circulation within the European Union (EU) as feedingstuffs or in feedingstuffs. Specifically, these are substitution products developed by the feedingstuffs industry.

Since these products are obtained using new manufacturing techniques, it is necessary to regulate their marketing in the EU as feedingstuffs or constituents of feedingstuffs by prescribing, for each group concerned, which individual products are authorised and under what conditions of use.

Before including a new product in one of the groups concerned, it must be ascertained that it has the required nutritional value. It must also be established that these products, when used sensibly, have no detrimental effect on human or animal health or on the environment and do not harm the consumer by impairing the distinctive features of animal products.

In certain cases it is essential to provide for labelling to protect the user against fraud and to facilitate the optimal use of the products available to him.

The products in question are listed in the annex. Provision has been made for a Community procedure to adapt the provisions of the annex and the guidelines laid down for the submission of dossiers relating to certain products and, where necessary, to fix criteria of composition and purity as well as the physico-chemical and biological properties of these products in the light of the development of scientific and technical knowledge. In the event of amendment of the annex, the European Food Safety Authority must be consulted.

Member States must prescribe that the products listed in the annex may not be marketed as feedingstuffs or incorporated in feedingstuffs unless any particulars laid down in the annex appear on the package or container or on a label attached thereto.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 82/471/EEC 15.07.1982 15.07.1984 OJ L 213 of 21.07.1982
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 84/443/EEC 27.07.1984 30.06.1985 OJ L 245 of 14.09.1984
Directive 85/509/EEC 13.11.1985 30.06.1986 OJ L 314 of 07.11.1985
Directive 86/530/EEC 29.10.1986 30.06.1988 OJ L 312 of 07.11.1986
Directive 88/485/EEC 29.07.1988 30.06.1989 OJ L 239 of 30.08.1988
Directive 89/520/EEC 14.09.1989 31.12.1990 OJ L 270 of 19.09.1989
Directive 90/439/EEC 25.07.1990 30.06.1991 OJ L 227 of 21.08.1990
Directive 93/26/EEC 22.07.1993 31.03.1994 OJ L 179 of 22.07.1993
Directive 93/56/EEC 07.07.1993 30.06.1994 OJ L 206 of 18.08.1993
Directive 93/74/EEC 23.09.1993 30.06.1995 OJ L 237 of 22.09.1993
Directive 95/33/EC 07.08.1995 30.06.1996 OJ L 167 of 18.07.1995
Directive 96/25/EC 12.06.1996 30.06.1998 OJ L 125 of 23.05.1996
Directive 1999/20/EC 25.03.1999 30.09.1999 OJ L 80 of 25.03.1999
Directive 2003/104/EC 20.11.2003 20.05.2004 OJ L 295 of 13.11.2003
Regulation (EC) No 1829/2003 11.07.2003 OJ L 268 of 18.10.2003
Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 20.11.2003 OJ L 284 of 31.10.2003
Directive 2004/116/EC 31.12.2004 30.06.2005 OJ L 379 of 24.12.2004

Related Acts

Directive 83/228/EEC [Official Journal L 126 of 13.05.1983]
Council Directive of 18 April 1983 on the fixing of guidelines for the assessment of certain products used in animal nutrition.

Decision 85/382/EEC [Official Journal L 217 of 14.08.1985]

Commission Decision of 10 July 1985 prohibiting the use in feedingstuffs of protein products obtained from Candida yeasts cultivated on n-alkanes.