Category Archives: Road transport

Road transport is the principal means of transport in the European Union for both passengers and goods. Today, the European Union has almost one vehicle for every two residents, and road freight traffic represents more than two thirds of the total tonnage. European Union action focuses essentially on controlling the multiple costs of road transport. Transport development must comply with safety requirements as well as environmental protection. In addition, a number of aspects of transport are the subject of European regulation, whether this is competition between transport operators, access to the profession, working conditions or the technical standards of vehicles.

Checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road

Checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 95/50/EC of 6 October 1995 on uniform procedures for checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road [See amending acts].

Summary

This directive applies to checks carried out by European Union (EU) countries on the transport of dangerous goods by road in vehicles travelling in their territory or entering it from a third country. It does not apply to the transport of dangerous goods under the responsibility of the armed forces.

These checks are carried out in the territory of an EU country, provided that they are not carried out as frontier checks at the internal frontiers of the EU, but as part of normal checks without discrimination.

These checks must cover at least the items included in the checklist in Annex I to the directive, be carried out at different places, at any time of the day, and cover a sufficiently extensive portion of the road network to make checkpoints difficult to avoid.

Consignments found to be in infringement may be immobilised, and obliged to be brought into conformity before continuing their journey, or be subject to other appropriate measures, depending on the circumstances or the requirements of safety including, where appropriate, refusal to allow such vehicles to enter the EU.

Checks may also be carried out at the premises of undertakings.

EU countries must work together to effectively implement this directive (report of the infringement to the country in which the carrier is registered, cooperation between EU countries to exchange information, etc.).

Each EU country must send the Commission a report for each calendar year on the application of the directive, including the particulars listed in the directive, such as the number of checks carried out, the number of vehicles checked by place of registration, and the number and type of infringements recorded.

Starting in 1999 and subsequently at least every three years, the Commission will send the European Parliament and the Council a report on the application of the directive by the EU countries.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 95/50/EC

17.10.1995

31.12.1996

OJ L 249 of 17.10.1995

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2001/26/EC

23.6.2001

23.12.2001

OJ L 168 of 23.6.2001

Directive 2004/112/EC

3.1.2005

14.12.2005

OJ L 367 of 14.12.2004

Directive 2008/54/EC

11.7.2008

OJ L 162 of 21.6.2008

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 95/50/EC have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purposes only.

Related Acts

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council of 7 July 2010 on the application by the member states of Council Directive 95/50/EC on uniform procedures for checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road [COM (2010) 364 – Not published in the Official Journal].
This report covers the period from 2006 to 2007. It concludes that all EU countries have carried out road checks in accordance with Directive 95/50/EC. The Commission found a significant improvement in the volume and quality of the data submitted. Within the checks reported, there continues to be a proportion of vehicles found to infringe the EU legislation. The number of checks in the EU has increased, reaching about 285 000 annual checks in 2007. The number of infringements per check appears to be stable with an infringement detected in approximately one out of eight checks. The fact that almost 10,000 vehicles were immobilised following their check due to a serious infringement demonstrates that practical enforcement of rules on the transport of dangerous goods at the roadside is useful and helps to improve safety.

Directive 2008/68/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 September 2008 on the inland transport of dangerous goods [Official Journal L 260 of 30.9.2008].

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council of 13 December 2007 on the application by the Member States of Council Directive 95/50/EC on uniform procedures for checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road [COM (2007) 795 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council on the application by the member states of Council Directive 95/50/EC on uniform procedures for checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road [COM (2005) 430 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Directive 2004/112/EC of 13 December 2004 adapting to technical progress Council Directive 95/50/EC on uniform procedures for checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road [Official Journal L 367 of 14.12.2004].

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council of 6 September 2000 on the application by the Member States of Council Directive 95/50/EC on uniform procedures for checks on the transport of dangerous goods by road [COM (2000) 517 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers

The purpose of this directive is to require undertakings involved in the carriage of dangerous goods to designate one or more safety advisers to be responsible for helping to prevent the type of risk inherent in this kind of transport operation.

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 96/35/EC of 3 June 1996 on the appointment and vocational qualification of safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods by road, rail and inland waterway [Official Journal L 145 of 19.06.1996].

Summary

Aim: To require Member States to ensure that undertakings the activities of which include the transport, or the related loading or unloading, of dangerous goods by road, rail or inland waterway each appoint one or more safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods, responsible for helping to prevent the risks inherent in such activities with regard to persons, property and the environment.

Definition of terms: (undertakings, safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods, etc.).

Exemptions: The Directive does not apply to:

  • the carriage of goods under the authority of the armed forces;
  • activities concerning quantities within the limits defined in the Directive;
  • undertakings which only occasionally engage in the national transport of dangerous goods posing little danger or risk of pollution.

Role and appointment of adviser: The adviser has to seek all appropriate means and promote all appropriate action to ensure that dangerous goods are transported in the safest possible way.

Training certificate: the adviser must hold a vocational training certificate covering at least the subjects listed in Annex II to the Directive, the aim being to ensure that the candidate is sufficiently aware of the risks inherent in the transport of dangerous goods, knows the laws in question and has sufficient knowledge of the duties of the adviser defined in Annex I.

Validity of the certificate: five years, may be extended where, during the final year before its expiry, its holder has followed refresher courses or passed an examination both of which must be approved by the competent authority.

Accident report: In the event of an accident affecting persons, property or the environment, the adviser is required to draw up a report.

Adaptation of the Directive: The Directive sets up an advisory committee to assist the Commission by giving its opinion on the legislation in question.

Directive 96/35/EC will be repealed by Directive 2008/68/EC tr0006 as from 30 June 2009.

References

Act Date
of entry into force
Final date for implementation in the Member States
Directive 96/35/EC 09.07.1996 31.12.1999

Related Acts

Directive2000/18/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 17 April 2000 on minimum examination requirements for safety advisers for the transport of dangerous goods by road, rail or inland waterway [Official Journal L 118 of 19.5.2000]

Directive 96/35/EC lays down that undertakings whose activities include the transport of dangerous goods must appoint one or more safety advisers. However, that directive does not contain any detailed provisions aimed at the harmonisation of examination requirements for safety advisers or any provisions applicable to examination bodies. For this reason, Directive 2000/18/EC establishes a common minimum framework for the examination of safety advisers and the conditions for the examination bodies in order to guarantee a certain level of quality and to facilitate the mutual recognition of EC certificates of training for safety advisers.
The national authorities organise a compulsory written examination which may be supplemented by an oral examination to check whether candidates possess the necessary level of knowledge required to carry out the tasks of adviser in order to obtain the EC certificate. This examination covers general prevention and safety measures, the classification of dangerous goods, general packaging requirements, danger markings and labels etc.
If Member States do not take direct charge of the organisation of the examination, they must appoint the examination bodies on the basis of various criteria such as: competence of the examination body, independence of the body etc.
Directive 2000/18/EC entered into force on 19.5.2000. It will be repealed by Directive 2008/68/EC as from 30 June 2008.

Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: community database on road traffic accidents

Document or Iniciative

Council Decision 93/704/EEC of 30 November 1993 on the setting-up of a Community database on road traffic accidents [See amending acts].

Summary

Requirement that Member States record statistics on bodily damage caused by road traffic accidents taking place on their territory (collision between users involving at least one vehicle and causing deaths or injuries).

Requirement that the Member States pass on those data each year to the Statistical Office of the European Communities (Eurostat).

Requirement that the Commission ensures that the data received are disseminated and that the base functions properly (conditions attached to access to statistics, any publications, etc.) in cooperation with the Committee for the statistical programme.

Three years after implementation of this decision, the Commission will send the Council an assessment report on the results obtained and on the resultant pointers for the continuation of the activities.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 93/704/EC 22.12.1993 OJ L 329 of 30.12.1993
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 20.11.2003 OJ L 284 of 31.10.2003

Related Acts

Commission report of 26 May 1997 on the progress made with the Community’s “CARE” database on bodily damage caused by road traffic accidents and on the future course to be followed by that data base [COM(97) 238 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

In implementing Article 6 of Decision 93/704/EC this report reviews the first three years of the practical application of the CARE project. Overall that review is positive: the system quickly became operational, the data are available and their confidentiality ensured. In future it will be possible to make improvements, more particularly as regards the homogenisation of accident data. New information would have to be provided in order to round off the comparative international analyses, while the cooperation between the Member States, which plays an essential part in data management and quality, and in the development of a policy concerning CARE access and application, would have to be boosted.

Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: promoting road safety in the European Union

This Communication aims to improve road safety with a view to reducing the number of accidents in the European Union.

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions: Promoting road safety in the European Union: – the programme for 1997-2001 [COM (97) 131 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Communication takes stock of road safety matters in the European Union for the years 1993-1996:

  • almost all legislative measures announced in the action programme presented in 1993 have been undertaken;
  • all planned studies have been carried out; these focused mainly on vehicles (passive safety), telematic applications and behaviour analysis;
  • non-legislative measures such as the Year of the Young Driver 1995 and the YES campaigns were implemented;
  • the CARE project was initiated, facilitating the creation of a detailed database on road accidents involving personal injury in the different Member States.

The trends and characteristics of road safety in the European Union are as follows:

  • figures vary widely from one country to another;
  • an explosion in the number of cars in certain Member States has gone hand in hand with a worsening of the situation in those countries;
  • the number of fatal accidents is decreasing;
  • those most at risk are pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists, young adults and the elderly;
  • alcohol is still a significant factor in accidents, despite the undoubted success of alcohol-related programmes in some countries;

The Commission advocates a cost-benefit approach in the formulation of future road safety policy.

The record shows that road accidents are estimated to cost 45 billion euros per year, consisting of 15 billion for medical care, police involvement and vehicle repairs, and 30 billion in lost economic production due to fatalities or injuries. With 45 000 vicitims annually, the avoidance of a fatal accident would save 1 million euros. There is therefore an economic justification for taking measures costing up to one million euros rder to save a single life (“the million euros rule”).

Using this approach, the Commission identifies several courses of action involving:

  • the wearing of seat belts;
  • vehicle design (reduction of the risk to pedestrians, improvements to passive safety):
  • the use of collision warning and cruise control systems;
  • day running lights;
  • speed;
  • blood alcohol level while driving;
  • the effect of drugs or medicines on driving;
  • infrastructures.

The aim of this new policy is to reduce the annual total of victims to 18 000 in 2010 (as against 27 000 if the current policy is maintained).

The primary role of the Commission is:

  • to monitor the overall progress of road safety in the Union;
  • to collect, interpret and disseminate information relating to all aspects of road safety;
  • to ensure that the most efficient practices are promoted throughout the whole of Europe;
  • to collect information on offences giving rise to serious accidents in the Union;
  • to support research.

The main elements of the programme for 1997-2001 are the following:

  • a Commission Recommendation which acknowledges the high financial cost of road accidents by applying cost-benefit methods of evaluation to road safety measures;
  • an integrated information system for the European Union which would consolidate information on accident statistics and data on the implementation of road safety measures, research etc.
  • measures aimed at combating driving while in a state of fatigue or under the influence of alcohol, medicines or drugs;
  • the application of technology and telematics in order to increase driving safety;
  • the co-ordination and promotion of a safety classification system so as to give consumers scientifically accurate information on vehicle safety features.

Related Acts

Council resolution of 26 June 2000 on the improvement of road safety [Official Journal C 218 of 31.7.2000].

The Council welcomes the publication of the Progress Report (see point 8 below), which forms part of the second Community action programme for the promotion of road safety in the European Union for the period 1997 – 2001. The Council finds that progress needs to be made in three areas:

  1. In terms of legislation, the Council proposes to extend the compulsory use of seatbelts, to extend the scope of the legislation on speed limitation devices to include vehicles weighing over 3.5 tonnes, to introduce legislation requiring motorbike and moped users to wear helmets, and to act in relation to a maximum blood-alcohol level for drivers;
  2. In terms of research, the Council wishes to pursue efforts under the existing research programmes (evaluation of new car models, influence of drugs and medicinal products on drivers, telematic systems, safety systems, etc.) and to initiate other research (secondary effects of air bags, effects of making it compulsory to wear a helmet, etc.);The Council wishes to promote information campaigns and exchange of information on road safety.

Priorities in EU road safety: Progress Report and Ranking of Actions. Communication from the Commission of 17 March 2000 [COM (2000) 125 Not published in the Official Journal].
The Communication takes up suggestions from the Council and the European Parliament to issue a progress report on the Action Programme. It gives a ranking to future measures at Community level and makes a recommendation to decision-makers at all levels to give more weight to the fact that the cost of preventing accidents is generally much lower than the economic cost of the casualties and damage they cause.
The Commission considers the current Action Programme (1997 – 2001) a success. Much has been achieved in the strategic fields of improving enforcement of traffic rules and regulations, raising public awareness of road safety, and the gathering and dissemination of information on safety issues.
A multi-criteria analysis followed by a cost-effectiveness assessment of the actions listed in the 1997-2001 Programme has led to the definition of the following short and medium-term priorities in road safety in the EU:

  • Continue to work with and develop the European New Car Assessment Programme, (EuroNCAP);
  • Campaigns and legislation on seat belts and child restraints;
  • Recommendation to the Member States on maximum blood alcohol levels in traffic;
  • Legislation on speed limiters for light commercial vehicles;
  • Develop guidelines for ‘Black Spot’ management (places with a concentration of accidents) and the design of ‘forgiving’ roadsides (i.e. less likely to cause injury in the event of an accident);
  • Legislation on safer car fronts for pedestrians and cyclists.

Beyond these key priorities the Communication lists a further five measures for which more research into cost-effectiveness is desirable: medical standards for driving licences; standards for driving tests; daytime running lights; effects of medicines on driver behaviour; post-accident care.
Three supporting measures also receive a high priority: the CARE accident statistics data base; an integrated information system; research into vehicle standards and telematics.
Finally, the Communication contains a Recommendation from the Commission encouraging the governments and local and regional authorities of the Member States to establish the practice of calculating the costs and effects of road safety measures, to increase investments in these measures and to develop mechanisms that will enable the benefits of road safety measures to be felt more directly by those taking the decisions and bearing the costs of their implementation.

Passengers and goods: Driver attestation

Passengers and goods: Driver attestation

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Passengers and goods: Driver attestation

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Passengers and goods: Driver attestation

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 484/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 1 March 2002 amending Council Regulations (EEC) No 881/92 and (EEC) No 3118/93 for the purposes of establishing a driver attestation [Official Journal L 76, 19.03.2002].

Summary

Background

The impossibility of checking whether drivers are legally employed or used outside the territory of the Member State where a haulier is established has given rise to a market in which drivers from third countries are sometimes irregularly used only to carry out the international carriage of goods outside the Member State in which the haulier employing them is established. This Regulation has been designed to combat such practices.

These irregularly employed drivers often work in precarious conditions and are poorly paid, which is a threat to road safety. This situation seriously distorts competition between hauliers engaged in such practices and those that use only legally employed drivers.

New rules

International carriage by road was already subject to a Community authorisation under Regulation (EEC) No 881/92. Under Regulation (EC) No 484/2002, drivers who are nationals of third countries must from now on be in possession of a driver attestation.

The attestation must certify that a driver is employed in the haulier’s Member State of establishment in accordance with the laws and regulations applicable in that Member State.

The scope of the Regulation is restricted to drivers from non-member countries. The scope may be extended to drivers who are nationals of Member States, after evaluation by the Commission.

Driver attestations will be issued by a Member State to the haulier requesting them for each driver who is the national of a third country and whom he legally employs.

The attestation must comply with the model in the Annex to the Regulation. Driver attestations are issued for a period to be determined by the issuing Member State, subject however to a maximum validity of five years. The attestation must be produced whenever required by authorised inspecting officers.

The competent authorities of a Member State may withdraw a driver attestation where the holder:

  • has failed to observe the conditions in accordance with which the attestation was issued;
  • has supplied incorrect information in relation to the data required for the issue or renewal of a driver attestation.

A certified true copy of the driver attestation must be kept at the haulier’s premises.

The original driver attestation must be kept on board the vehicle and presented for inspection whenever required by authorised inspecting officers.

Act

Date of entry into force

Deadline for implementation by the Member States

Regulation (EC) N°484/2002

19.03.2002

19.03.2003

Minimum levels of safety in European road tunnels

Minimum levels of safety in European road tunnels

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Minimum levels of safety in European road tunnels

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Minimum levels of safety in European road tunnels

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2004/54/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 April 2004 on minimum safety requirements for tunnels in the trans-European road network [See amending act].

Summary

Background

Tunnels are important infrastructures which facilitate communication between extensive areas of the European Union (EU) and are therefore essential for long-distance transport and the development of regional economies.

However, accidents in tunnels, and particularly fires, can have dramatic consequences and can prove extremely costly in terms of human life, increased congestion, pollution and repair costs.

The fires in the Mont Blanc (France/Italy) and Tauern (Austria) tunnels in 1999 and in the Gotthard (Switzerland) tunnel in 2001 have highlighted the potential consequences, in human and economic terms, of such accidents in tunnels: dozens of dead and injured, and major European trunk roads blocked for months, if not years.

The Commission’s concern at this increase in the accident rate led to its White Paper entitled “European transport policy for 2010: time to decide” announcing minimum safety requirements for road tunnels in the trans-European road network.

This directive lays down a set of harmonised minimum safety standards dealing with the various organisational, structural, technical and operational aspects.

The aim of this directive is to ensure that all tunnels longer than 500 metres, whether in operation, under construction or at the design stage, and forming part of the trans-European road network, comply with the new harmonised safety requirements. Tunnels shorter than 500 metres do not generally need to be equipped with mechanical ventilation systems, as the hot smoke emitted by the fire is naturally stratified.

Administrative authority

Each EU country must designate one or more administrative authorities, responsible for all aspects of safety, which take the necessary measures to ensure that the directive is complied with.

The administrative authority may be set up at national, regional or local level. In the case of transfrontier tunnels, either each EU country appoints an administrative authority or the two EU countries appoint a joint administrative authority.

The prior authorisation of the administrative authority is required in the event of the commissioning of a new tunnel or rebuilding of an existing one. The administrative authority has power to suspend or restrict the operation of a tunnel if the safety conditions are not met.

The administrative authority ensures that the following tasks are performed:

  • testing and inspecting tunnels on a regular basis and drawing up the related safety requirements;
  • putting in place organisational and operational schemes (including emergency response plans) for the training and equipping of emergency services;
  • establishing the procedure for immediate closure of a tunnel in case of an emergency;
  • implementing the necessary risk reduction measures.

Tunnel manager

For each tunnel located on the territory of an EU country, whether it is in the design, construction or operating stage, the administrative authority identifies as Tunnel Manager the public or private body responsible for the management of the tunnel at the stage in question. Any significant incident or accident occurring in a tunnel must be the subject of an incident report prepared by the Tunnel Manager.

Safety officer

For each tunnel, the Tunnel Manager, with the prior approval of the administrative authority, nominates a Safety Officer who coordinates all preventive and safeguarding measures to ensure the safety of users and operations staff. The Safety Officer performs the following tasks:

  • ensures coordination with the emergency services and takes part in the preparation of operational schemes;
  • takes part in the planning, implementation and evaluation of emergency operations;
  • takes part in the definition of safety plans and the specification of infrastructure installations;
  • verifies that operational staff and emergency services are trained, and takes part in the organisation of exercises held at regular intervals;
  • gives advice on the commissioning of the structure, equipment and operation of tunnels;
  • verifies that the tunnel structure and equipment are maintained and repaired;
  • takes part in the evaluation of any significant incident or accident.

In the case of tunnels that have been approved at the design stage but which have not been opened to the public by 30 April 2005, the administrative authority assesses their compliance with this directive.

With regard to tunnels that have been opened to the public by that date, the administrative authority has until 30 October 2005 to assess their compliance with this directive.

By 30 April 2005, EU countries must submit a report to the Commission on how they intend to meet the requirements of the directive, on planned measures, and, where appropriate, on the consequences of opening or closing the main access roads to the tunnels.

Periodic inspections

EU countries ensure that inspections, evaluations and tests are carried out by inspection entities.

The administrative authority verifies that regular inspections are carried out by the inspection entity to ensure that all tunnels falling within the scope of this directive comply with its provisions. The period between two consecutive inspections of any given tunnel should not exceed six years.

Risk analysis

A risk analysis, based on a single methodology defined at national level, is, at the request of the administrative authority, carried out by an independent body for a given tunnel, taking into account all design factors and traffic conditions that affect safety, notably traffic characteristics and type, length and geometry of the tunnel, as well as the projected number of heavy goods vehicles per day.

Reports

By 30 April 2009 the Commission must publish a report on the practice followed in EU countries.

Every two years, EU countries compile reports on fires in tunnels and on accidents which clearly affect the safety of road users in tunnels, and on the frequency and causes of such incidents, and evaluate them and provide information on the actual role and effectiveness of safety facilities and measures.

The Commission shall adapt the annexes to this directive according to technical progress.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2004/54/EC

30.4.2004

30.4.2006

OJ L 167, 30.04.2004

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 596/2009

7.8.2009

OJ L 188, 18.7.2009

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 2004/54/EC have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purposes only.

Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Road safety: dimensions and maximum weights authorised for both national and international journeys

Last updated: 04.09.2007

Goods: statistical returns on the carriage of goods by road

Goods: statistical returns on the carriage of goods by road

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Goods: statistical returns on the carriage of goods by road

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Goods: statistical returns on the carriage of goods by road

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1172/98 of 25 May 1998 on statistical returns in respect of carriage of goods by road. [See amending acts].

Summary

The Regulation is intended to supplement the current production of statistical data on the carriage of goods by road.

The Member States are to compile Community statistics on the carriage of goods by road by means of goods road motor vehicles registered in a Member State, and on the journeys made by such vehicles.

The Regulation does not apply to carriage of goods by road by means of:

  • goods road motor vehicles whose permitted weight or dimensions exceed the normal permitted limits in the Member States concerned.
  • agricultural vehicles, military vehicles, and vehicles used by central governments and public services, with the exception of goods road motor vehicles used by the railway administration.

The Member States may exclude from the field of application of the proposal goods road motor vehicles:

  • whose load capacity is less than 3.5 tonnes;
    or
  • whose maximum permissible laden weight is less than 6 tonnes.

The Member States are to collect:

  • vehicle-related data ;
  • journey-related data ;
  • goods-related data.

The statistical variables in each domain, their definition and the levels within the classification used for their breakdown are set out in the annexes.

The methods for the collection of data are to ensure that the statistical results meet minimum standards of accuracy determined by the Commission.
Member States are to process the information collected in such a way as to obtain comparable statistics.

Member States are to transmit to Eurostat the data as well as the prepared statistical tables within five months of the end of each quarterly period of observation.

The Member States are to communicate:

  • a detailed report on the methods used in compiling data;
  • information on sample sizes, non-response rates, and the reliability of the results;

After three years, the Commission is to transmit a report to the Council and to the European Parliament.

During the first three years of implementation of the statistical returns the Member States are to receive financial assistance from the Community, subject to the availability of appropriations.

The proposal also describes the procedure for:

  • the dissemination of results ;
  • determining the arrangements for implementation.

The Statistical Programme Committee assists the Commission.

The Member States give the results for the years 1997 and 1998 to comply with Directive 78/546/EEC. This was repealed as of 1 January 1999.

Regulation 2691/1999 establishes a new consolidation procedure for international transport by Country.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1172/98 26.6.1998 OJ L 163 of 6.6.1998
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 2691/99 7.1.2000 OJ L 326 of 18.12.1999
Regulation (EC) No 642/2004 27.4.2004 OJ L 102 of 7.4.2004
Regulation (EC) No 1791/2006 1.1.2007 OJ L 363 of 20.12.2006
Regulation (EC) No 1893/2006 1.1.2008 OJ L 393 of 30.12.2006
Regulation (EC) 1304/2007 28.11.2007 OJ L 290 of 8.11.2007

 

Goods: distribution of permits for heavy goods vehicles travelling in Switzerland

Goods: distribution of permits for heavy goods vehicles travelling in Switzerland

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Goods: distribution of permits for heavy goods vehicles travelling in Switzerland

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Goods: distribution of permits for heavy goods vehicles travelling in Switzerland

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 2888/2000 of the European Parliament of 18 December 2000 on the distribution of permits for heavy goods vehicles travelling in Switzerland.

Summary

On 20 November 2000, the Swiss Confederation decided to grant permits to heavy goods vehicles, of a maximum of 34 tonnes, to travel in Switzerland from 1 January 2001 onwards and also to increase the number of permits granted for heavy vehicles (whose total laden weight exceeds 34 tonnes but is not more than 40 tonnes) and for unladen vehicles or those laden with lightweight goods. This Decision is accompanied by the introduction of the LSVA (Capacity-linked levy on heavy goods vehicles) in Switzerland.

However, this Swiss autonomous measure cannot be considered as provisional application of the agreement between the European Community and Switzerland regarding the transport of goods and passengers by rail and road, signed on 21 June 1999, which is currently being ratified.

As a result, and pending the agreement’s final entry into force, provision has been made to apply standards along with the current regulation, standards governing the distribution and management of the permits made available to the Community by the Swiss Decision from 1 January 2001.

From this date onwards, the regulation thus establishes the following arrangements for the issue of permits to the Community by Switzerland:

  • from 2001 and in 2002, 300 000 “heavy vehicles” permits will be distributed each year between the 15 Member States, in accordance with the percentage defined in Annex I, and in 2003 and 2004, this will increase to 400 000;
  • from 2001 to 2004, 220 000 “unladen vehicle” permits will be distributed each year (Annex II).

The regulation also details the Community permit distribution method for both heavy and unladen vehicles (Annex III). This is based on the objective criteria of transport operations leaving, entering or travelling in Switzerland and to other destinations, with a minimum of 1 500 permits for each Member State.

The regulation also provides for the establishment of statistics on the flow of heavy goods vehicle traffic in the Alpine region, on the basis of which the Commission will revise the number of permits allotted if numbers differ significantly from the percentage provided for in the Annex.

It is the Member States’ responsibility to distribute the permits they have for their countries to the transport undertakings that require them in an objective and non-discriminatory manner.

In order to ensure optimum use of permits, any permits not used by 15 September each year will be returned to the Commission who will redistribute them to other Member States.

A committee composed of representatives from the Member States and headed by the Commission representative has been created in order to be able to modify the distribution of permits.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 2888/2000 30.12.2000 L 336 of 30.12.2000

 

Goods: towards a safer and more competitive high-quality road transport system

Goods: towards a safer and more competitive high-quality road transport system

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Goods: towards a safer and more competitive high-quality road transport system

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Road transport

Goods: towards a safer and more competitive high-quality road transport system

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and Council of 21 June 2000 – Towards a safer and more competitive high-quality road transport system in the Community [COM (2000) 364 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Professional road transport is having to face certain challenges, as a result of which the Commission has developed a global strategy for the sector. Strengthening the conditions of fair competition should minimise the impact of increasing competition due to the advent of the internal market. Moreover, ever-increasing safety requirements mean that measures must be taken to protect the safety of workers and road users. Finally, in order to deal with the social disquiet caused by the use of illegally employed drivers, working conditions must be improved, monitoring strengthened and the image of the profession raised. The measures proposed come under four objectives: 1) preparing legislation on the organisation of working time for drivers; 2) fair conditions of employment for drivers; 3) improving road transport monitoring; 4) improving professional training for drivers.

Organisation of working time for drivers

In November 1998 the Commission presented a proposal for a Directive concerning the organisation of working time for mobile workers performing road transport activities. The proposal is currently blocked in the Council, due to differences of opinion among the Member States over whether or not to include self-employed drivers within the scope of the Directive.

Conditions for the employment of drivers

The “social disquiet” mentioned above is due to the growing number of drivers, often from third countries, being employed under “non-Community” working conditions (low wages, virtually unlimited working time, poor welfare cover, etc.). This situation is leading to the distortion of competition, and safety problems. In order to deal with the matter, the Commission proposes to introduce a “driver’s certification” as a means of controlling the regularity of conditions of drivers’ employment. The certification will be issued by the Member State authorities. The Commission will soon be presenting a proposal for a Regulation to this effect.

Monitoring of road transport

The effectiveness of the measures to increase safety, competition and ensure fair working conditions depends on the existence of monitoring in the transport sector. The Commission is planning a communication on inspections and penalties in the sector, and aims to strengthen Directive 88/599/EEC by increasing the number of working days to be monitored by Member States. Certain other measures already exist, and the electronic tachograph will be obligatory from the end of 2002 under Regulation (EC) No 2135/98.

Professional training

Driver training is currently regulated by Directive 76/914/EEC on training for some road transport drivers, and Directive 91/439/EEC on driving licences. The Commission will soon present a proposal for a Directive laying down common rules on training for all new professional drivers, taking account of the complexity of the profession.

Conclusion

The Commission will consider at a later stage whether it is necessary to amend the common rules on driving and rest times. The action being taken by the Commission in the road transport sector is currently focused on reinforcing cohesion in the industry. The Commission also proposes a global approach with a package of measures taking account of road safety, competition and the economic and social aspects of road transport.

Related Acts

Directive 2006/1/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 January 2006 on the use of vehicles hired without drivers for the carriage of goods by road (codified version) (Text with EEA relevance)

Directive 2006/94/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 December 2006 on the establishment of common rules for certain types of carriage of goods by road (codified version) (Text with EEA relevance)