Category Archives: European Health Strategy

The European strategy on health matters places health issues at the heart of all Community policies in order to protect European citizens better and to improve their health. In particular, it concerns facing up to the growing problems and major health risks, such as pandemics and bioterrorism.
The strategy also defines the objectives and priorities in response to the main challenges in terms of health matters. It also strengthens Community cooperation in those fields where Member States cannot act on their own, and contributes to disseminating knowledge and information on the subject. Finally, it supports research, particularly on new technologies, in order to improve disease prevention and patient safety.

E-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

e-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about e-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Information society > Digital Strategy i2010 Strategy eEurope Action Plan Digital Strategy Programmes

e-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

The “e-Health” action plan shows how to use information and communications technologies (ICT) to provide better quality healthcare throughout Europe, at a stable or lower cost, and to reduce waiting times and errors. The aim of the action plan is the creation of a “European e-Health Area” and it identifies practical steps to achieve this by developing electronic systems for health records, patient identifiers and health cards, and the faster rollout of high speed internet access for health systems to allow the full potential of e-Health to be delivered. The ultimate aim is for e-Health to become the norm among the healthcare profession, patients and the general population by the end of the decade.

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 30 April 2004 entitled “e-Health – making healthcare better for European citizens: An action plan for a European e-Health Area” [COM(2004) 356 final – not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The “e-Health” action plan forms part of the strategy set out in the European Union’s eEurope action plan, the purpose of which is to make the advantages of the information society available to all European citizens.

The main objective of the “e-Health” action plan is to enable the European Union (EU) to exploit the full potential of online health systems and services within a European e-Health Area.

There are three main target areas:

  • addressing challenges common to all the Member States of the EU and creating the right framework to support e-Health;
  • setting up pilot actions to jump start the delivery of e-Health; and
  • sharing best practices and evaluating progress.

ADDRESSING COMMON CHALLENGES

Health authorities have an important role to play

The action plan proposes that, by end of 2005, each Member State develops a national or regional roadmap for e-Health.

Interoperability of health information systems

The need to identify a person and transmit medical information unambiguously throughout Europe is an important component of the interoperability of health information systems.

The action plan therefore proposes that the Member States agree by the end of 2006 on a common approach to patient identifiers and the definition of interoperability standards for health data messages and electronic health records. This should take account of best practices, relevant standardisation efforts and developments in areas such as the European Health Insurance Card and identity management for European citizens.

Mobility of patients and health professionals

Patients and health professionals are becoming increasingly mobile within the European Union.

The EU has already adopted a Communication on patient mobility and work is already underway to improve information on the subject. Progress is being made in particular through the health systems working party.

Enhancing infrastructure and technologies

Under the action plan, during the period 2004-2008 Member States should support the deployment of health information networks for e-Health based on fixed and wireless broadband and mobile infrastructures and Grid technologies.

Conformity of e-Health systems

Many European countries have already proceeded with accreditation of e-Health systems that have become models for other regions.

By mid-2005 the European Commission should produce a summary of European best practices as guidance for Member States.

The Member States should then, by the end of 2007, adopt conformity testing and accreditation schemes following successful best practices.

Leveraging investments

Considerable investment is required for any development or modernisation of systems and services. Consequently, under the action plan, a collaborative approach to supporting and boosting investment in e-Health should be undertaken among Member States by the end of 2006.

Legal and regulatory issues

According to the action plan, by the end of 2009 the European Commission should undertake activities in collaboration with Member States to:

  • set a baseline for a standardised European qualification for e-Health services in clinical and administrative settings;
  • provide a framework for greater legal certainty of e-Health products and services liability within the context of existing product liability legislation;
  • improve information for patients, health insurance schemes and healthcare providers regarding the rules applying to the assumption of the costs of e-Health services;
  • promote e-Health with a view to reducing occupational accidents and illnesses and support preventive actions in the face of the emergence of new workplace risks.

SETTING UP PILOT SCHEMES

A considerable number of pilot schemes in the field of e-Health are underway or about to be launched in the European Union.

Information for citizens and authorities on health education and disease prevention

As part of its work providing information for citizens, the Commission is currently preparing an EU-wide public health portal which should be operational by the end of 2005. The portal will give citizens a single point of access to information on public health, as well as on health and safety in the workplace.

The Commission is also working to enhance ICT tools to improve health threat early warning, detection, and surveillance measures.

Towards integrated health information networks

Major efforts are currently underway to establish health information networks. By the end of 2008 the majority of European health organisations should be able to provide online services such as teleconsultation (second medical opinion), e-prescriptions, e-referral, telemonitoring and telecare (remote monitoring of patients in their own homes).

Promoting the use of cards in healthcare

There are two types of cards that can be used in the healthcare sector: the health card, which may carry emergency data such as blood types, pathologies and treatments, and the health insurance card, which was launched on 1 January 2004 and replaces all the paper forms which were needed to benefit from medically-necessary care while on a temporary stay abroad.

Activities will be launched in the Member States to promote the use of these cards. It is also expected that the implementation of an electronic health insurance card will be adopted by 2008.

MONITORING OF PRACTICES

Disseminating best practices

e-Health must be supported by the widespread dissemination of best practices. These should include the impact on access to healthcare and on its quality, assessments of cost benefits and productivity gains, as well as examples of addressing liability in telemedicine services, reimbursement schemes, and accreditation of e-Health products and services.

Best practice will be spread through meetings held between the Member States and supported by the European Commission. Alongside this, the European Commission should, by the end of 2005, establish an effective way of systematically disseminating best practices.

Evaluation

Between 2004 and 2010 the European Commission will publish a biennial study on the progress made in implementing e-Health.

THE EUROPEAN UNION AND E-HEALTH

Why does the EU need to develop its e-Health systems and services?

For some years European countries have been facing rising demand for health and social services as a result of an ageing population and higher income levels, although the funding available remains limited. At the same time, citizens have higher expectations and the mobility of patients and of health professionals has increased. Huge quantities of medical information are difficult for the authorities to manage.

Developing e-Health systems and services should help solve these problems. It could in particular help reduce costs and improve productivity in such areas as billing and record-keeping, reducing medical error, cutting down on unnecessary care, and also in improving the quality of healthcare.

Today at least four out of five European doctors have an internet connection, and a quarter of Europeans use the internet to get information about diseases and health matters. These encouraging figures indicate that e-Health systems and services will develop rapidly.

European Community research funding has supported e-Health to the tune of EUR 500 million since the early 1990s, with total investment through co-financing being around twice that amount. Many of today’s success stories are the product of that research. All this has helped to create a new e-Health industry with a turnover of EUR 11 billion. Estimates suggest that by 2010 up to 5% of health budgets will be invested in e-Health systems and services.

This action plan is only part of the EU’s response to the huge challenges that health services across the EU are facing. Two further examples include action on patient mobilityand the benchmarking of national reforms of healthcare systems.

 


Another Normative about e-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Public health > European health strategy

e-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

The “e-Health” action plan shows how to use information and communications technologies (ICT) to provide better quality healthcare throughout Europe, at a stable or lower cost, and to reduce waiting times and errors. The aim of the action plan is the creation of a “European e-Health Area” and it identifies practical steps to achieve this by developing electronic systems for health records, patient identifiers and health cards, and the faster rollout of high speed internet access for health systems to allow the full potential of e-Health to be delivered. The ultimate aim is for e-Health to become the norm among the healthcare profession, patients and the general population by the end of the decade.

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 30 April 2004 entitled “e-Health – making healthcare better for European citizens: An action plan for a European e-Health Area” [COM(2004) 356 final – not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The “e-Health” action plan forms part of the strategy set out in the European Union’s eEurope action plan, the purpose of which is to make the advantages of the information society available to all European citizens.

The main objective of the “e-Health” action plan is to enable the European Union (EU) to exploit the full potential of online health systems and services within a European e-Health Area.

There are three main target areas:

  • addressing challenges common to all the Member States of the EU and creating the right framework to support e-Health;
  • setting up pilot actions to jump start the delivery of e-Health; and
  • sharing best practices and evaluating progress.

ADDRESSING COMMON CHALLENGES

Health authorities have an important role to play

The action plan proposes that, by end of 2005, each Member State develops a national or regional roadmap for e-Health.

Interoperability of health information systems

The need to identify a person and transmit medical information unambiguously throughout Europe is an important component of the interoperability of health information systems.

The action plan therefore proposes that the Member States agree by the end of 2006 on a common approach to patient identifiers and the definition of interoperability standards for health data messages and electronic health records. This should take account of best practices, relevant standardisation efforts and developments in areas such as the European Health Insurance Card and identity management for European citizens.

Mobility of patients and health professionals

Patients and health professionals are becoming increasingly mobile within the European Union.

The EU has already adopted a Communication on patient mobility and work is already underway to improve information on the subject. Progress is being made in particular through the health systems working party.

Enhancing infrastructure and technologies

Under the action plan, during the period 2004-2008 Member States should support the deployment of health information networks for e-Health based on fixed and wireless broadband and mobile infrastructures and Grid technologies.

Conformity of e-Health systems

Many European countries have already proceeded with accreditation of e-Health systems that have become models for other regions.

By mid-2005 the European Commission should produce a summary of European best practices as guidance for Member States.

The Member States should then, by the end of 2007, adopt conformity testing and accreditation schemes following successful best practices.

Leveraging investments

Considerable investment is required for any development or modernisation of systems and services. Consequently, under the action plan, a collaborative approach to supporting and boosting investment in e-Health should be undertaken among Member States by the end of 2006.

Legal and regulatory issues

According to the action plan, by the end of 2009 the European Commission should undertake activities in collaboration with Member States to:

  • set a baseline for a standardised European qualification for e-Health services in clinical and administrative settings;
  • provide a framework for greater legal certainty of e-Health products and services liability within the context of existing product liability legislation;
  • improve information for patients, health insurance schemes and healthcare providers regarding the rules applying to the assumption of the costs of e-Health services;
  • promote e-Health with a view to reducing occupational accidents and illnesses and support preventive actions in the face of the emergence of new workplace risks.

SETTING UP PILOT SCHEMES

A considerable number of pilot schemes in the field of e-Health are underway or about to be launched in the European Union.

Information for citizens and authorities on health education and disease prevention

As part of its work providing information for citizens, the Commission is currently preparing an EU-wide public health portal which should be operational by the end of 2005. The portal will give citizens a single point of access to information on public health, as well as on health and safety in the workplace.

The Commission is also working to enhance ICT tools to improve health threat early warning, detection, and surveillance measures.

Towards integrated health information networks

Major efforts are currently underway to establish health information networks. By the end of 2008 the majority of European health organisations should be able to provide online services such as teleconsultation (second medical opinion), e-prescriptions, e-referral, telemonitoring and telecare (remote monitoring of patients in their own homes).

Promoting the use of cards in healthcare

There are two types of cards that can be used in the healthcare sector: the health card, which may carry emergency data such as blood types, pathologies and treatments, and the health insurance card, which was launched on 1 January 2004 and replaces all the paper forms which were needed to benefit from medically-necessary care while on a temporary stay abroad.

Activities will be launched in the Member States to promote the use of these cards. It is also expected that the implementation of an electronic health insurance card will be adopted by 2008.

MONITORING OF PRACTICES

Disseminating best practices

e-Health must be supported by the widespread dissemination of best practices. These should include the impact on access to healthcare and on its quality, assessments of cost benefits and productivity gains, as well as examples of addressing liability in telemedicine services, reimbursement schemes, and accreditation of e-Health products and services.

Best practice will be spread through meetings held between the Member States and supported by the European Commission. Alongside this, the European Commission should, by the end of 2005, establish an effective way of systematically disseminating best practices.

Evaluation

Between 2004 and 2010 the European Commission will publish a biennial study on the progress made in implementing e-Health.

THE EUROPEAN UNION AND E-HEALTH

Why does the EU need to develop its e-Health systems and services?

For some years European countries have been facing rising demand for health and social services as a result of an ageing population and higher income levels, although the funding available remains limited. At the same time, citizens have higher expectations and the mobility of patients and of health professionals has increased. Huge quantities of medical information are difficult for the authorities to manage.

Developing e-Health systems and services should help solve these problems. It could in particular help reduce costs and improve productivity in such areas as billing and record-keeping, reducing medical error, cutting down on unnecessary care, and also in improving the quality of healthcare.

Today at least four out of five European doctors have an internet connection, and a quarter of Europeans use the internet to get information about diseases and health matters. These encouraging figures indicate that e-Health systems and services will develop rapidly.

European Community research funding has supported e-Health to the tune of EUR 500 million since the early 1990s, with total investment through co-financing being around twice that amount. Many of today’s success stories are the product of that research. All this has helped to create a new e-Health industry with a turnover of EUR 11 billion. Estimates suggest that by 2010 up to 5% of health budgets will be invested in e-Health systems and services.

This action plan is only part of the EU’s response to the huge challenges that health services across the EU are facing. Two further examples include action on patient mobilityand the benchmarking of national reforms of healthcare systems.

 

Cross-border healthcare: patients’ rights

Cross-border healthcare: patients’ rights

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Cross-border healthcare: patients’ rights

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

Cross-border healthcare: patients’ rights

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2011/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 March 2011 on the application of patients’ rights in cross-border healthcare.

Summary

This Directive makes provision for the introduction of a general framework to:

  • clarify patients’ rights with regard to accessing cross-border healthcare provision *;
  • guarantee the safety, quality and efficiency of care that they will receive in another EU Member State;
  • promote cooperation between Member State on healthcare matters.

This Directive does not concern:

  • long-term care services;
  • public vaccination programmes.

Member States’ responsibilities

Each Member State shall designate one or several national contact points for cross-border healthcare. These contact points shall consult with patient associations, healthcare providers and healthcare insurers. They are responsible for providing patients with information on their rights when they decide to take advantage of cross-border healthcare and with the contact details of the other contact points in the other Member States.

The Member State of treatment
* organises and provides the healthcare. They are responsible for ensuring the quality and safety of the healthcare provided, in particular by implementing control mechanisms. They also ensure the protection of personal data and equal treatment for patients who are not nationals of their country. The national contact point in the Member State of treatment shall provide patients with the necessary information.

Following the provision of care, it is the Member State of affiliation
* who takes care of the reimbursement of the insured person on the condition that the treatment received is provided for under reimbursable care in their national legislation.

Procedures for reimbursing cross-border care

The Member State of affiliation shall ensure that the costs incurred by an insured person who receives cross-border care shall be reimbursed, on the condition that the person has the right to the type of care received. The amount of the reimbursement is equivalent to the amount which could have been reimbursed by the statutory social security system if the care was provided in their country. It must not exceed the actual costs of the care.

The Member State of affiliation may reimburse related costs, such as accommodation and travel costs.

An insured person may also receive reimbursement for services provided through the means of telemedicine.

With regard to certain cross-border healthcare *, the State of affiliation can implement a system of prior authorisation in order to avoid the risk of undermining the planning and/or financing of their health system. It must provide this authorisation automatically if the patient has the right to the healthcare in question and when this healthcare cannot be provided on its territory within a time limit which is medically justifiable. However, the State of affiliation may refuse to grant prior authorisation to a patient in very specific cases (as detailed in the Directive *).

If a patient requests prior authorisation and the conditions are met, authorisation must be granted in accordance with the Regulation relating to the coordination of social security systems, except if the patient requests to be treated under the framework of this Directive.

Administrative procedures relating to the provision of healthcare must be necessary and proportional. They should be implemented in a transparent manner, within fixed deadlines and based on objective and non-discriminatory criteria. When processing a request for cross-border healthcare, Member States must take into account the patient’s medical condition and the urgency of the specific circumstances.

Cooperation on healthcare

Member States will cooperate on the implementation of the Directive. In particular, they will support the creation of European reference networks of healthcare providers, which aim to facilitate the mobility of expertise and access to highly specialised care through the concentration and joining up of available resources and expertise.

Member States shall recognise the validity of medical prescriptions issued in other Member States if those medicines are authorised in their country. Measures must be taken to help health professionals mutually recognise and verify the authenticity of prescriptions.

Member States are also encouraged to cooperate in the treatment of rare diseases through the development of diagnostic and treatments methods. The Orphanet database and European networks can be used in this respect.

E-health systems or services also enable the provision of cross-border care. This Directive provides for the establishment of a network of national authorities responsible for ‘e-health’ with the aim of improving the continuity of care and guaranteeing access to high quality healthcare.

Lastly, the creation of a network of authorities or bodies responsible for evaluating health technologies will facilitate cooperation between the national competent authorities in this field.

Context

This Directive is in line with the Court of Justice jurisprudence following the Kohll and Decker judgement delivered on 28 April 1998 and which established the right of patients to be reimbursed for medical treatment in a Member State other than their own. It does not bring into question the Regulation principles on the coordination of social security systems, in particular the principles regarding equality between resident and non-resident patients of a Member State and the European Health Insurance Card.

Key terms of the act
  • Cross-border healthcare: healthcare provided or prescribed in a Member State other than the Member State of affiliation.
  • Member State of affiliation: the Member State where the patient is an insured person.
  • Member State of treatment: the Member State on whose territory cross-border healthcare is actually provided.
  • Care that may be subject to prior authorisation: 1. Care which is subject to planning and requires: (a) either overnight hospital accommodation of at least one night, or (b) that requires the use of highly specialised and cost-intensive medical infrastructure or medical equipment; 2. involves treatments presenting a particular risk for the patient or the population; 3. is provided by a healthcare provider that could give rise to serious and specific concerns relating to the quality or safety of the care.
  • Reasons for refusal to grant authorisation: 1. In the case of patient-safety risk; 2. In the case of a safety risk to the general public; 3. When there are serious and specific concerns relating to the healthcare provider regarding the respect of standards on quality of care and patient safety; 4. when this healthcare can be provided on its territory within a time limit which is medically justifiable.

Reference

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2011/24/EU

24.4.2011

25.10.2013

OJ L 88, 4.4.2011

Action against Cancer: European Partnership

Action against Cancer: European Partnership

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Action against Cancer: European Partnership

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

Action against Cancer: European Partnership (2009-2013)

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 24 June 2009 on Action against Cancer: European Partnership [COM(2009) 291 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

This Communication sets out the objectives of the European Partnership for Action against Cancer.

Cancer in Europe: a major challenge

Cancer is one of the major causes of mortality in the European Union (EU). Although the legal basis for action in the field of health largely falls on the Member States, to combat this disease effectively it is necessary to act at European level in order to avoid duplication of efforts throughout the European Union, to reduce inequalities between countries and to improve the use of limited resources.

It is essential to put in place preventive measures to extend individuals’ life-spans. It has been estimated, for example, that if all women were to undergo cervical cancer screening, life years lost could be reduced by 94 %.

Action against cancer should be carried out collectively in order to facilitate the identification and sharing of information, capacity and expertise in prevention and treatment. This action carried out collectively in partnership should enable all Member States to have integrated cancer plans.

Areas covered by the Partnership

Prevention and early detection

One third of cancers could be avoided by acting on certain risk factors such as smoking and alcohol consumption, and by promoting healthy eating and physical activity. European strategies already exist in relation to obesity, alcoholism and smoking. A horizontal approach combining all of these aspects is encouraged under the European Partnership for Action against Cancer.

The individual’s environment, in particular indoor and outdoor air quality, and over-exposure to the sun, may be at the root of certain cancers.

The European Code Against Cancer is a specific anti-cancer tool: it contains a list of recommendations enabling citizens to take preventive measures linked to lifestyle.

Cancer can be treated successfully thanks to early screening and treatment strategies. In 2003 the Health Ministers of the Member States of the European Union (EU) unanimously adopted the Council Recommendation on Cancer Screening, leading to the implementation of screening campaigns for cervical cancer, breast cancer and colorectal cancer throughout the European Union. According to the first Report from the Commission on the implementation of the Council Recommendation of 2 December 2003 on cancer screening (EN ), however, it is necessary to go even further in screening for these cancers by aiming for 100 % coverage of the population concerned.

Identification and dissemination of good practice

Patients should be offered integrated cancer care giving consideration to psychosocial wellbeing and support. In addition to curative care, high-quality care must be provided to a rising number of chronic cancer patients in order to stabilise their illness for a number of years and to provide them with a good quality of life in the absence of a cure. The Partnership will permit the exchange of good practices between Member States in all fields of health care, including palliative care, in order to reduce inequalities between countries.

Cooperation and coordination in cancer research

Cancer research covers research into prevention, clinical research and translational research. Euro 750 million has been devoted to cancer research through the 6th and 7th Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development.

It is important to coordinate all sectors of research in order to avoid fragmentation of efforts throughout the EU. Forms of cooperation already exist such as the Innovative Medicine Initiative (IMI) and the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI).

Benchmarking process – providing the comparable information necessary for policy and action

The European Commission considers it necessary to have a cancer information system for the collection of data and identification of good practices.

The collection of data would make it possible to establish a common set of core indicators.

Working together in partnership

The Partnership brings together Member States, experts, health care professionals, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), patient groups, civil society representatives and industry.

The work should be undertaken in working groups each specialising in one of the four areas referred to above, coordinated by a steering group

The Partnership started in the third quarter of 2009. It will be funded by joint action, a financial instrument existing until the end of the current financial framework, i.e. 2013.

Background

In 2006 cancer accounted for two out of ten deaths in women and three out of ten deaths in men. 3.2 million cancers are diagnosed every year in Europe. Faced with the extent of this phenomenon, the European Union must respond collectively in order to reduce the number of deaths and to improve public health. The Partnership set up for the period 2009-2013 is a response to combat the spread of this scourge in Europe.

See also:

Multi-annual programme of action for health

Multi-annual programme of action for health

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Multi-annual programme of action for health

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

Multi-annual programme of action for health (2014-2020) (Proposal)

Proposal

Proposal for a Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 November 2011 on establishing a Health for Growth Programme, the third multi-annual programme of EU action in the field of health for the period 2014-2020 [COM(2011) 709 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Health for Growth Programme (2014-2020) is the third multi-annual programme of European Union (EU) action. It helps/supports Member States in order to:

  • undertake the necessary reforms to achieve innovative and sustainable health systems;
  • improve access to better and safer health care for citizens;
  • promote good health of European citizens and prevent diseases;
  • protect European citizens from cross-border threats.

Objective No 1: Contributing to innovative and sustainable health systems

The European Commission must help Member States to address shortages of human and financial resources. It must also promote the implementation of innovation in health care, for example e-Health, and the sharing of expertise in this field. The Programme also supports the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing.

Objective No 2: Increasing access to better and safer healthcare for citizens

The Commission suggests setting up the accreditation of European Reference Networks. This would allow, for example, action to be supported in the field of rare diseases. European guidelines should also be developed on patient safety and the use of antimicrobials.

Objective No 3: Promoting good health and preventing diseases

Member States are invited to exchange best practices on smoking prevention, abuse of alcohol and obesity. Specific action should also help to prevent chronic diseases, including cancer.

Objective No 4: Protecting citizens from cross border health threats

The Commission considers that the level of preparedness and response for serious cross border health threats must be improved.

Financial provisions

The financial allocation for the Programme is EUR 446 million for the period from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2020. The following may participate in the Programme:

  • all EU Member States;
  • countries acceding to the EU, candidate countries and potential candidates benefiting from a pre-accession strategy;
  • European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries in accordance with the conditions established in the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement;
  • neighbouring countries and countries to which the European Neighbourhood Policy (ENP) applies in accordance with the conditions established in bilateral or multilateral agreements.

The EU may also make financial contributions in the form of grants or public procurement to fund actions having European added value, or grants for the functioning of non-governmental bodies. Such grants contribute 60 % of eligible costs and cover a wide spectrum of legally established organisations such as:

  • public authorities and public sector bodies;
  • research institutions;
  • health institutions;
  • universities;
  • higher education establishments;
  • undertakings.

In exceptional cases only, these grants may be up to 80 % of eligible costs.

Funding may also cover expenditure on preparatory, monitoring, control, audit and evaluation activities required for the implementation of the Programme.

Implementation of the Programme

Implementation of Programme actions shall be monitored by the Commission, in close collaboration with Member States. The Commission shall, furthermore, be assisted by a committee pursuant to the Regulation on the Commission’s exercise of implementing powers.

Member States shall designate National Focal Points in order to disseminate the Programme and its results in their countries.

This Regulation repeals the Decision on the Second programme of Community action in the field of health from 1 January 2014.

Reference

Proposal Official Journal Procedure

COM(2011) 709 final

2011/0339/COD

Second programme of Community action in the field of health

Second programme of Community action in the field of health

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Second programme of Community action in the field of health

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

Second programme of Community action in the field of health (2008-2013)

Document or Iniciative

Decision No 1350/2007/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2007 establishing a second programme of Community action in the field of health (2008-2013).

Summary

The first programme of Community action in the field of public health (2003-2008) contributed to fundamental improvements in this area.

However, the European Union (EU) must make further efforts to improve the health and safety of its citizens. This Decision therefore establishes a second programme of Community action in the field of health for the period from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2013. It draws on the achievements of the previous programme, which it replaces, and supplements and supports the policies of the Member States.

This second programme has three main objectives:

  • to improve citizens’ health security;
  • to promote health, which involves reducing inequalities in this area;
  • to generate and disseminate health information and knowledge.

Actions have been planned to achieve each of the objectives. These actions help to prevent major diseases and lessen their impact. They are set out in the Annex to the Decision.

Financing

The programme has a budget of 321 500 000 euro for the period 2008-2013.

Implementation of the programme

The Commission is responsible for implementing the programme in close cooperation with the Member States.

Within their respective fields of competence, the Commission and the Member States guarantee the efficient running of the programme and create mechanisms for achieving its objectives.

They guarantee the comparability of data and the compatibility of the systems for exchanging health information. They also cooperate with the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and with other competent EU agencies.

Lastly, the Commission and the Member States ensure the protection, confidentiality and security of personal data throughout the implementation of the programme.

An annual work schedule for programme implementation is established. It sets the priorities to be respected and the actions to be taken.

Joint strategies and actions

In order to encourage the integration of health into other Community policies and to ensure a high level of health protection, actions in tandem with other Community programmes and actions can be established.

Participation of third countries

The programme is open to:

  • EFTA/EEA countries (European Free Trade Association/European Economic Area), in accordance with the conditions of the EEA Agreement;
  • third countries: countries included in the European Neighbourhood Policy, countries applying for accession, candidate accession countries or countries in the process of accession to the EU and the countries of the Western Balkans included in the stabilisation and association process, in accordance with the conditions set by the various bilateral or multilateral agreements.

International cooperation

Cooperation with non-participating third countries and the international organisations competent in the field of public health, such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), is also encouraged.

Comitology

A committee assists the Commission with the implementation of the programme.

Evaluation

The Commission will present an independent external report on the results obtained, the qualitative and quantitative aspects of programme implementation, and its consistency and complementarity with other Community actions and programmes by 31 December 2010 at the latest. Its aim is to assess the impact of the measures taken. The Commission will also present a Communication on the continuation of the programme by 31 December 2011 at the latest, as well as an external ex-post evaluation report on the programme results by 31 December 2015 at the latest.

Repeal

This Decision repeals Decision No 1786/2002/EC.

REFERENCES

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Decision No 1350/2007/EC [adoption: codecision COD/2005/0042]

21.11.2007 – 31.12.2013

OJ L 301 of 20.11.2007

New Community health strategy

New Community health strategy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about New Community health strategy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

New Community health strategy

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission of 16 May 2000 to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the health strategy of the European Community [COM(2000) 285 final — Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

European Union citizens rightly attach great importance to their health and expect to be protected from possible dangers. The Community has a crucial role to play and is obliged to guarantee a high level of protection for its citizens. Due to the emergence of new challenges and priorities in the field of health, such as enlargement, the emergence of new illnesses, pressures on health systems and increased Community obligations following the amendments to the Treaty (Articles 3 and 152), it is necessary to develop a new strategy.

This new strategy is the result of the debate launched in 1998 with the communication of the Commission on the development of public health policy. It takes account of the results of this debate as well as the experiences of previous action programmes.

Two main elements

The strategy consists of two main elements:

  • a new framework for action in public health (“public health framework”), which includes the adoption of a Community action programme in the field of public health (2001-2006);
  • the development of an integrated health strategy. As a result of the Treaty provision which stipulates that a high level of health protection must be ensured in the definition and implementation of Community policies, health protection concerns all key areas of Community activity. This new strategy contains specific measures to incorporate health protection into all Community policies.

The public health framework, which is the key element of the strategy, includes those measures which relate specifically to public health. A new action programme is part of this framework for which three main strands of intervention are identified:

  • improving information on health for all levels of society;
  • setting up a rapid reaction mechanism to respond to the major health threats;
  • tackling health determinants, in particular harmful factors related to lifestyle.

By emphasising the areas where Member States cannot be effective individually — and where coordination at Community level is therefore essential — the Community intends to optimise its impact with a limited budget and bring Community added value. It is planned to extend the existing programmes before the launch of the new action programme until such time as this is established.

In addition to the public health programme, the public health framework contains other legislative measures in a range of sub-areas which will be developed within the framework. These include:

  • the prevention and monitoring of communicable diseases, notably through theand control of communicable diseases, set up in 1999;
  • prevention of drug dependence: activities to supplement the Union’s action plan to combat drugs 2000-2004 will be launched;
  • combating nicotine addiction: activities will be undertaken to supplement initiatives already adopted (such as the proposal for a new directive on the manufacture, presentation and sale of tobacco products);
  • the quality and safety of organs and substances of human origin: creation of a global strategy, which is already being developed, on drafting legislation on this subject;
  • blood and blood derivatives: several measures are planned, such as a proposal for a directive establishing a framework for quality and safety standards, the creation of a Community haemovigilance network and the promotion of optimum use of blood and blood derivatives;
  • veterinary and phytosanitary measures: the measures to be taken in this field will be closely linked to the policies developed within the new global strategy on food safety set out in the White Paper on Food Safety;
  • the European Health Forum: it is planned to set up this new mechanism to allow all those involved in public health to play a part in drawing up health policy.

Preparation of an integrated strategy

To ensure that the Community’s global health strategy is coherent, there has to be a close link between public health measures and health-related initiatives taken in other policy areas such as the single market, consumer protection, social protection, employment and the environment.
These links also have to be supported by new mechanisms and instruments guaranteeing the contribution of other Community policies to health protection:

  • as of 2001, proposals relating to health will include a statement explaining how and why health issues have been taken into consideration, and describing the expected impact on health;
  • a priority task of the public health programme will be to develop criteria and methods for assessing the policies proposed and the way in which they are implemented, with the possibility of carrying out an in-depth evaluation of the impact on certain measures or policies;
  • the public health programme provides for the possibility of carrying out joint measures together with other Community programmes and agencies;
  • within the Commission, mechanisms which guarantee the coordination of health-related activities will be strengthened.

This new strategy represents a major commitment on the part of the Community and shows the importance which the Commission attaches to public health in Community policies.

Related Acts

Decision No 1786/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 September 2002 adopting a programme of Community action in the field of public health (2003-2008) [Official Journal L271 of 09.10.2002].

The programme is an essential component of the European Community’s health strategy. Its objectives are to improve information and knowledge for the development of public health and healthcare systems, enhance the capability of responding rapidly and in a coordinated fashion to health threats, and tackle health determinants.

A new strategic approach to health for the EU

A new strategic approach to health for the EU

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about A new strategic approach to health for the EU

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

A new strategic approach to health for the EU (2008-2013)

Document or Iniciative

Commission White Paper of 23 October 2007 ‘Together for Health: A Strategic Approach for the EU 2008-2013’ [COM(2007) 630 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The area of health is essentially the responsibility of the Member States. The role of the European Union (EU), as laid down in the European treaties, is to undertake measures to supplement the work of the Member States, while providing European added value, particularly with regard to major health threats, issues that have a cross-border or international impact and questions relating to the free movement of goods, services and people.

Accordingly, a cross-sectoral approach is vital and all Community policies must play a role in health protection.

The new strategy set out in the White Paper therefore relates to health in all sectors. It must also, in a single strategic framework, confront the growing challenges for the health of the population, such as demographic changes, pandemics, bioterrorism and illnesses related to unhealthy lifestyles.

The White Paper proposes four principles for the coming years.

Principle I: a strategy based on shared health values

The Commission and the Member States have worked together to develop an approach to EU healthcare systems that is based on common values.

In 2006, the Council adopted a statement on these values, underlining that universality, access to good quality care, equity and solidarity were fundamental.

A new statement on the common values of health policy in the broader sense should be adopted based on this Council statement.

Patients’ rights, such as participation in decision making and health literacy, should also be taken into consideration in Community health policy. Consequently, the Commission must support programmes that boost health literacy among different age groups.

Inequalities in the health sector still exist between different Member States and between different regions, as well as worldwide. Life expectancy rates at birth do vary greatly between European countries. Given that reducing inequalities is linked to improving health, the Commission will put forward measures to help reduce these inequalities.

Health policy must be based on the best scientific evidence available. To this end, the Commission must gather comparable data from the Member States. Therefore, a system of health indicators is needed, with common mechanisms for collecting comparable data at all levels.

Principle II: health is the greatest wealth

A healthy population is a prerequisite for economic productivity and prosperity. In fact, life expectancy in good health, i.e. how long the population lives in good health, is a key factor for economic growth.

Spending on health-related problems represents a significant economic burden for society. Therefore, the first priority for health expenditure should be investment in prevention, to protect the general health of the population.

It is not always easy to understand the economic impact of an improvement in health levels or the economic factors linked to health and sickness. The Commission and the Member States must develop a programme of analytical studies of the economic relationships between health status, health investment and economic growth.

Principle III: health in all policies (HIAP)

Health policy is not the only policy of decisive importance in health matters. Other policies, such as environment, research and regional policies, those regulating pharmaceuticals and foodstuffs, those coordinating social security systems and those governing tobacco taxation, play an essential role. Accordingly, synergies must be created between all the sectors that are of vital importance for health.

Health in all policies allows a system of more effective Community action to be put in place.

Globalisation means that the HIAP approach must also be applied to foreign policy, including development and trade.

The Commission and the Member States must therefore ensure that health concerns are better integrated into all policies at Community, Member State and regional level.

Principle IV: strengthening the EU’s voice in global health

In order to better protect the health of its citizens and citizens of third countries, the EU must do more to improve health throughout the world. Community actions must not be disassociated from actions taken at a global level.

The EU must therefore consolidate its position within international organisations and strengthen cooperation with its partners.

Finally, it must ensure that health concerns are properly provided for in EU external assistance mechanisms and that international health agreements are implemented, particularly international health regulations.

In addition to these principles, there are three strategic objectives that define Community action in the field of health for the coming years.

Objective I: fostering good health in an ageing Europe

Europe has a low birth rate and people are living longer and longer. In the future, population ageing is bound to lead to a sharp rise in demand for healthcare.

This could push up healthcare spending, but this rise could be halved if people remained healthy as they got older.

The Commission must therefore support appropriate measures to improve the health of older people, active people and children, so as to help the population become more productive and age in good health.

Other measures concerning tobacco, nutrition, alcohol and mental health must also be developed, and new guidelines on cancer screening will be prepared.

Objective II: protecting citizens from health threats

Protecting human health is an obligation in the EU. At Community level, this protection includes scientific risk assessment, preparedness for and response to epidemics and bioterrorism, improving workers’ safety and measures concerning accidents.

However, there must be Community cooperation and coordination between the Member States and international actors in order to combat pandemics, biological incidents and bioterrorism.

The impact on public health of new threats, such as those linked to climate change, must also be studied, and the mechanisms for surveillance and response to health threats must be strengthened.

Objective III: supporting dynamic health systems and new technologies

New technologies can improve disease prevention and facilitate patient safety.

A Community framework for safe and high-quality health services is therefore needed and, in particular, measures to support the Member States and regions in managing innovation in health systems.

Implementation mechanism and financing

The Member States must work together closely for the purposes of this strategy. The Commission will therefore put forward a structured cooperation mechanism for implementing the strategy to promote cooperation between the Member States.

This strategy will be financed by the current financial instruments, which expire in 2013.

European health strategy

European health strategy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about European health strategy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

European health strategy

The European strategy on health matters places health issues at the heart of all Community policies in order to protect European citizens better and to improve their health. In particular, it concerns facing up to the growing problems and major health risks, such as pandemics and bioterrorism.
The strategy also defines the objectives and priorities in response to the main challenges in terms of health matters. It also strengthens Community cooperation in those fields where Member States cannot act on their own, and contributes to disseminating knowledge and information on the subject. Finally, it supports research, particularly on new technologies, in order to improve disease prevention and patient safety.

Overview of Health Policy

  • Multi-annual programme of action for health (2014-2020) (Proposal)
  • A new strategic approach to health for the EU (2008-2013)
  • New Community health strategy
  • Patient safety and the prevention of healthcare associated infections
  • Cross-border healthcare: patients’ rights
  • Telemedicine systems and services
  • Executive Agency for Health and Consumers
  • Scientific Committees for consumer safety, public health and the environment
  • The precautionary principle

Programs and Initiatives

  • Action against Cancer: European Partnership (2009-2013)
  • Second programme of Community action in the field of health (2008-2013)
  • Programme of Community action in the field of public health (2003-2008)
  • e-Health: improving health and healthcare through the use of information and communications technologies

Health personnel in Europe

  • Green Paper on the European Workforce for Health

Green Paper on the European Workforce for Health

Green Paper on the European Workforce for Health

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Green Paper on the European Workforce for Health

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Public health > European health strategy

Green Paper on the European Workforce for Health

Document or Iniciative

Green Paper from the Commission of 10 December 2008 on the health workforce [COM(2008) 725 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

This Green Paper examines the challenges that the European Union (EU) must tackle at present with regard to its health workforce, and suggests some adapted solutions with a view to public consultation on this subject.

Legal framework and basis for action at Community level

Although Member States are responsible for the organisation and provision of health services and medical care, the Treaty establishing the European Community (EC Treaty) provides for a certain level of coordination at Community level. Moreover, secondary legislation defines the rules that are applicable at national level, including some applying to the health workforce, and in particular in terms of labour law.

Challenges faced by the health workforce

Medical staff and all the professions which contribute to organising and providing health care are considered by the Green Paper. The designation of health workforce includes, for example, public health specialists, social workers, trainers and alternative medicine.

Demography, a sustainable health workforce and public health capacity

European citizens are living longer and it is essential to guarantee their good health throughout their lifespan.

An ageing population implies an increase in the number of chronic conditions. The demand for health care is therefore increasing, whilst a considerable portion of the workforce required to meet these needs is approaching retirement age. Indeed, there is a lack of new health professionals able to replace them.

Moreover, inequalities in access to care, health promotion, and health and safety at work are determinants of public health, to which this workforce should pay increasing attention.

Training and information

If health needs multiply and the replacement of health staff is not guaranteed, more universities, training schools and teachers will be needed. It will also be important to plan which specialised skills will be the most necessary.

There is little comparable data or updated information about the health workforce and its mobility.

Mobility and migration of the health workforce

Mobility of health professionals has a dual effect. A positive effect because it can allow supply to be adapted to demand. Professionals can indeed go where they are most needed. This free circulation can also have negative effects in that it can create imbalances and inequalities in terms of availability of health staff.

A major problem is the phenomenon of the brain drain from third countries to the European Union. For this reason circular migration should be put in place.

To this end, in 2008, the European Social Dialogue Committee in the Hospital sector, composed of HOSPEEM (European Hospital and Healthcare Employers’ Association) and the European Federation of Public Service Unions (EPSU), adopted a ‘code of conduct and follow up on Ethical Cross-Border Recruitment and Retention’. This measure aims to promote ethical practices when recruiting health workers.

New technologies and entrepreneurship

In the future, new technologies such as telemedicine may be able to counteract some deficiencies of the present health system. The introduction of new technologies represents certain challenges which the Green Paper proposes to meet by inviting Member States to:

  • guarantee training in the use of these new technologies;
  • encourage the use of new information technologies.

Some health workers run their own practices and employ staff. The European Union encourages this type of activity, all the more so since the creation of small and medium-sized enterprises contributes to the objectives of the Lisbon Strategy.

Some proposals made by the Green Paper

The Green Paper proposes several ways forward, pending the results of the public consultation on the health workforce. They include:

  • strengthening capacity for screening, health promotion and disease prevention;
  • making numerusclausus more flexible in application to health workers;
  • exchanging good practice on their mobility;
  • reconsidering the principles of recruiting staff from third countries;
  • collecting comparable information about health workers;
  • guaranteeing training for these workers in the use of these new technologies, amongst other skills;
  • further encouraging entrepreneurs to enter the health sector.

Context

This Green Paper aims to initiate a debate on the health workforce in the European Union. This debate could identify how to best promote and train the workforce and enable it to meet the current demographic, technological and migratory challenges. A public consultation was held between December 2008 and March 2009.

Programme of Community action in the field of public health

Programme of Community action in the field of public health

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Programme of Community action in the field of public health

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Public health > European health strategy

Programme of Community action in the field of public health (2003-2008)

The Programme of Community action in the field of public health (2003-2008) was prepared with a view to contributing to the achievement of a high level of health protection in Europe. To this end, it focuses on health information, the Community’s capacity to react to health threats, and the prevention of diseases and illness.

Document or Iniciative

Decision 1786/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 September 2002 adopting a programme of Community action in the field of public health (2003-2008).

Repealed by Decision No 1350/2007/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2007 establishing a second programme of Community action in the field of health (2008-13) [Official Journal L 301 of 20.11.2007].

Summary

This action programme is a comprehensive programme which replaces eight existing actions in the field of health. These programmes concerned health promotion, cancer, AIDS and certain communicable diseases, drug addiction, health surveillance and pollution-related diseases, injury prevention and rare diseases.

The programme forms an essential part of the European Community’s health strategy, focusing on the following objectives and general measures:

  • improving information and knowledge with a view to promoting public health and health systems
    Actions
    : development of a comprehensive system for collecting, analysing and evaluating data and knowledge in order to inform, advise and disseminate information at all levels of society, including the general public, authorities and health professionals;
  • boosting the ability to respond rapidly and coherently to health threats such as the cross-border menace of HIV, new variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and pollution-related diseases;
    Actions: developing, strengthening and assisting the capacity, operation and inter-linking of surveillance, early-warning and rapid-reaction mechanisms;
  • addressing health determinants
    Actions
    : wide-ranging health-promotion activities accompanied by measures and specific instruments to reduce and eliminate risks.
    key priorities: to reduce the high number of premature deaths and illnesses caused by major diseases such as cancer, and to tackle mental illness. Consequently, emphasis will be placed on key factors associated with lifestyle, socio-economic situation and the environment, such as smoking, drinking, drug addiction, nutrition and stress.

In addition to the above measures, an annual work programme comprising specific objectives and activities is to be drawn up, along with health indicators. Provision will be made also for linking up with other Community programmes and activities.

Having regard to the principle of subsidiarity and the restrictions placed on the Community in health matters, the active cooperation and wholehearted commitment of all the Member States will be essential to the smooth running of the programme and to achieving its objectives.

Funding

A budget of EUR 312 million has been allocated to the programme for the period 2003-2008.

Countries entitled to participate

The programme is open to the participation of:

  • the EFTA/EEA countries, in accordance with the conditions laid down in the EEA Agreement;
  • the associated countries of Central and Eastern Europe, in accordance with the conditions laid down in the Europe Agreements, in their Protocols and in the decisions of the respective Association Councils;
  • Cyprus, funded by additional appropriations in accordance with the procedures to be agreed with that country;
  • Malta and Turkey, funded by additional appropriations in accordance with the provisions of the Treaty.

International cooperation

Cooperation with third countries and with international organisations working in the sphere of public health, such as the World Health Organisation (WHO), will also be encouraged.

Evaluation

It is anticipated that the programme will be subjected to dual evaluation: evaluation based on the indicators and results contained in the annual work programmes, and evaluation carried out by external independent experts half-way through the programme, i.e. in the third and final years of the programme, and after its completion. The results will be made publicly available. It is also expected that the Commission will present a report to the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions at the mid-term point, i.e. in the third year, and a final report.

Extension of existing programmes

A Commission proposal [COM(2000) 448 final – Not published in the Official Journal] grants a limited extension to existing programmes which are due to end before the new programme is launched, in order to avoid any interruption in key areas.

Executive agency

On1 January 2005, the Executive Agency for Health and Consumers became the Executive Agency for Health and Consumers. It assists the Commission in the implementation of the second Public Health Programme 2008-2013, the Consumer Programme for 2007-2013 and the implementation of food safety training measures.

The agency is based in Luxembourg.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 1786/2002/EC

9.10.2002

L271 of 9.10.2002

Related Acts

COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAMME 2008 – 13

Decision No 1350/2007/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2007 establishing a second programme of Community action in the field of health (2008-2013) [Official Journal L 301 of 20.11.2007].

REPORTS

Commission report of 23 July 2008 – Implementation of the Public Health Programme 2007 [COM(2008)482 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission report of 17 April 2008 – Implementation of the Public Health Programme 2006 [COM(2008)198 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission of 23 November 2006: Implementation of the Public Health Programme in 2005 [COM(2006) 711 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

In 2005, some fifty or so projects were considered suitable for funding under the European Public Health Programme. In terms of the main public health activities conducted in 2005, the report focuses on:

  • health information: the publication of a Green Paper on mental health, further work on the establishment of a comprehensive European health and environment information system, research on the potential health effects of third generation mobile phones, the promotion of eHealth services, progress made in developing health indicators;
  • health threats: the adoption of action plans on EU preparedness planning for public health threats and influenza pandemics;
  • health determinants: the Green Paper on promoting healthy diets and physical activity, the funding of important projects concerning alcohol, progress made in the field of public health genetics through networking and information exchange.

Report from the Commission of 24 October 2005 – Projects of the Public health programme committed in 2003-2004 [COM(2005) 511 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The report highlights the significant results obtained in the first two years of the programme, which solicited vivid interest among those in the field of health in Europe. The programme received many applications, and in total some 150 projects were funded under the 2003 and 2004 budgets.

EXECUTIVE AGENCY

Commission Decision No 544/2008/EC of 20 June 2008 amending Decision 2004/858/EC in order to transform the “Executive Agency for the Public Health Programme” into the “Executive Agency for Health and Consumers” [Official Journal L 173 of 3.07.2008].

The Commission ensures the overall management of the adopted programmes and measures. The Executive Agency is responsible for their implementation and gathers the information required to assess them.

EUROPEAN PUBLIC HEALTH STRATEGY

White paper – Together for Health: A Strategic Approach for the EU 2008-2013 [COM(2007) 630 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission of 16 May 2000 to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on the health strategy of the European Community [COM(2000) 285 final – not published in the Official Journal]
This communication sets out the Community’s broad health strategy, i.e. how it is working to achieve a coherent and effective approach to health issues across all the different policy areas. The action programme 2003-2008 is a key element in this strategy.