Category Archives: Ongoing Enlargement

The enlargement process is based on a certain number of principles and instruments which have been drawn up gradually, especially in the context of the fifth enlargement. Its objective is to prepare the candidate countries to assume the obligations deriving from Member State status. The Copenhagen criteria determine the conditions to be respected by the candidate countries: the political and economic criteria and the adoption and application of European legislation (acquis). This process requires considerable effort on the part of the candidate countries, which are judged on their own merits, especially in terms of strengthening institutions and reforms. The EU has therefore established various instruments to support and assist them and to evaluate their preparation and needs at each stage of the enlargement process.

The acquis in the field of telecommunications aims to eliminate obstacles to the smooth operation of the single market for telecommunications services and networks and to establish modern services which are accessible to all.

Enlargement strategy and 2003 report on the candidate countries

Enlargement strategy and 2003 report on the candidate countries

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Enlargement strategy and 2003 report on the candidate countries

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement

Enlargement strategy and 2003 report on the candidate countries

1) Objective

To review the progress of Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey towards accession to the European Union and to establish the future strategy of the EU for these three candidate countries.

2) Document or Iniciative

Continuing enlargement: Strategy paper and Report of the European Commission on progress towards accession by Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey [COM(2003) 676 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

3) Summary

The Commission states that Bulgaria, Romania and Turkey have made significant progress towards meeting the accession criteria. Accession negotiations are well advanced with Bulgaria and Romania, and will continue on the basis of the same principles that guided the negotiations with the ten acceding countries (Estonia, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia). The EU supports Bulgaria and Romania’s ambition to become members in 2007. Turkey needs to make further progress in compliance with the accession criteria. In December 2004 the European Council will take a decision regarding the opening of accession negotiations with Turkey.

Progress achieved by Bulgaria and Romania

Bulgaria and Romania have continued to comply with the Copenhagen political criteria. However, corruption remains a problem in both countries. Further efforts will still be needed to achieve efficient and capable public administrations. Problems with the living conditions of the mentally disabled and children placed in institutions still persist in Bulgaria, as do cases of degrading treatment by the police and trafficking in human beings. In Romania, solutions need to be found for problems relating to cumbersome administrative procedures, lack of transparency and inadequate capacity to apply policies.

In terms of the economic criteria, the report indicates that both candidates have viable market economies. If Bulgaria and Romania continue to apply their reform programmes, their economies will be fit to take on market forces within the EU in the near future.

Bulgaria and Romania have both made good progress with the adoption of the Community acquis. If they continue at the same pace, transposition of the acquis should be completed before the envisaged accession date. However, administrative and judicial capacity need to be further improved to allow proper application of the acquis. The quality of the legislation transposed in Romania has not always been adequate, and revisions are called for.

Pre-accession strategy for Bulgaria and Romania

At the beginning of 2004 the Commission will be presenting a three-year financial framework for the accession of Bulgaria and Romania.

Institution building in the candidate countries and investment in acquis-related development remain the principal objectives of Community pre-accession assistance, in particular under the Phare programme. Another priority of this assistance is economic and social cohesion.

Completion of negotiations with Bulgaria and Romania

Negotiations on the 31 chapters of the Community acquis have been opened with Bulgaria and Romania. At the date of publication of the report, 26 chapters were provisionally closed with Bulgaria, and 20 with Romania. Progress with the negotiations depends on each country’s progress in transposing and implementing the acquis. For the two countries to be able to join the Union in 2007, the Accession Treaty must be signed by the end of 2005 at the latest, and negotiations must be completed well before that.

Progress achieved by Turkey

Turkey has accelerated legislative reform to comply with the political criteria. However, it is not yet in total compliance. Further efforts are needed to close the gap between legislation and practice. The Commission emphasises that failure to reach an agreement to solve the Cyprus problem could be a serious obstacle to Turkey joining the EU. It considers that an overall settlement of the problem is possible before the accession of Cyprus to the Union on 1 May 2004.

In terms of the economic criteria, the Turkish market economy has made considerable progress. Nevertheless, some macroeconomic imbalances persist.

As regards the criterion of adopting the Community acquis, Turkey has made good progress in certain areas, but further efforts are needed in others. Administrative capacity needs to be significantly increased to improve implementation of the acquis. The independence and operation of the judiciary, the overall framework for the exercise of fundamental freedoms, alignment of civil-military relations with European practice, the situation in the South-East of the country and cultural rights are all areas in which improvement is required.

Pre-accession strategy for Turkey

Financial assistance to Turkey of EUR 1 050 million is planned for the period 2004-2006.

Turkey participates in a number of Community programmes in different fields, and in the European Environment Agency.

Opening of negotiations with Turkey

Before the end of October 2004 the Commission will publish a report on how Turkey has complied with the political accession criteria. In December 2004 the European Council will take account of this document in reaching a decision regarding the possible opening of accession negotiations with Turkey.

4) Implementing Measures

5) Follow-Up Work

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Progress with enlargement: Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia

Progress with enlargement: Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Progress with enlargement: Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement

Progress with enlargement: Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia (2004)

In view of the progress they have made, the Commission wishes to conclude negotiations with Bulgaria and Romania by the end of 2004, with a view to their joining the EU on 1 January 2007. However, the Commission advocates including a safeguard clause in their Accession Treaties allowing for the possibility of postponing their accession by one year.
Negotiations were to be started with Croatia in 2005 within the framework of an enhanced pre-accession strategy drawing on the conclusions of the Commission opinion on Croatia’s candidacy. The Council decided, however, not to set a firm date for the opening of negotiations because it first wanted to see Croatia cooperating fully with the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY).

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 6 November 2004: “Strategy Paper of the European Commission on progress in the enlargement process” [COM(2004) 657 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

Summary

BULGARIA AND ROMANIA

Progress

The regular reports published every year by the Commission assess the candidate countries’ capacity to meet all their obligations on accession. In the light of last year’s reports, the Commission sums up the progress made by Bulgaria and Romania in terms of the Copenhagen criteria:

  • Political criteria: both countries satisfy the Copenhagen political criteria, although the Commission advocates continued efforts on reform of the public administration, the functioning of the judicial system and combating corruption.
  • Economic criteria: both countries fulfil the necessary conditions for establishing a viable market economy. Vigorous and efficient implementation of far-reaching structural reforms should enable both countries to cope with competitive pressure and market forces within the Union.
  • Adoption of the Community acquis: in general, Bulgaria and Romania are meeting the commitments they made in the negotiations and have made good progress with adopting the acquis. The Commission concludes that both countries should have completed legislative transposition in time for accession, but urges them to develop adequate administrative and judicial capacity to implement the acquis.

The accession process

The Commission considers that the accession negotiations with both Bulgaria and Romania are going well. In spring 2004 a financing framework was defined and all the chapters were provisionally closed with Bulgaria in June 2004. In Romania’s case three chapters remain to be negotiated: Competition, Environment and Justice and Home Affairs (JHA).

In view of the advanced state of negotiations, work began on drawing up the Accession Treaty for Bulgaria and Romania in July 2004. It will cover the entire acquis adopted and published as of 1 October 2004, the results of the accession negotiations and any transitional arrangements and will provide for adjustments of the acquis after enlargement. Once it has been approved by all the parties, the Accession Treaty will be the subject of a Commission opinion and endorsed by a European Parliament opinion. Lastly the Council will adopt its decision and all the Member States will then have to ratify the Treaty. The objective is for the Treaty to enter into force on 1 January 2007.

A pre-accession strategy, including substantial financial assistance, will allow the EU to support Bulgaria’s and Romania’s preparations for accession. From November 2005 the Commission will publish annual monitoring reports to ensure that Bulgaria and Romania are meeting the commitments they made in the negotiations. Any delay or problem will be promptly reported to the Council.

Three safeguard clauses (on the economy, the internal market and JHA) will be included in the Accession Treaty to allow for any serious shortcomings. A specific safeguard clause will also allow the accession date to be postponed to January 2008 if there is any serious risk that one of the candidates will be unable to fulfil the conditions of accession in time.

Conclusions and recommendations

In view of the progress made with implementing the Copenhagen criteria, the Commission is confident that the accession of Bulgaria and Romania can go ahead on 1 January 2007. It will do everything possible to meet the Council’s objectives of completing negotiations in 2004 so that the Accession Treaty can be signed in 2005.

However, the Commission points out several areas in which there is an urgent need for improvement before accession. These are JHA for both countries and competition and the environment for Romania.

Bulgaria and Romania will not immediately adopt the euro upon accession. The removal of border controls will also be put off until some time after accession, and will be decided on separately by each Member State. However, both countries will become members of the European Economic Area as soon as they join the EU.

CROATIA

The Commission recommends extending to Croatia the enhanced pre-accession strategy for candidate countries. It points out that the European Council has decided to start negotiations with Croatia at the beginning of 2005 and is setting the framework for negotiations.

Pre-accession strategy

The review procedure, aimed at assessing candidate countries’ progress towards membership, will start to be applied to Croatia as of 2005. Under this procedure the Commission will start issuing Regular Reports on Croatia from autumn 2005. Accession preparations will draw on the conclusions of the Commission opinion on Croatia’s accession application.

As a candidate country Croatia will benefit from three pre-accession financial instruments from 1 January 2005:

  • Phare: institution building and economic and social cohesion;
  • ISPA: environment and transport;
  • SAPARD: rural development.

The Commission also recommends creating a fourth Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA), from which Croatia will benefit from 2007.

The Stabilisation and Association Agreement (SAA) which Croatia signed in 2001 should play an important role in trade matters and its structures will serve as an interface for monitoring Croatia’s progress on alignment with the acquis. A framework agreement on participation in Community programmes and agencies should enter into force in the first half of 2005.

Negotiation framework

Under a decision of the Brussels European Council of June 2004 the Commission proposes that the framework for negotiations with Croatia should be based on the following principles:

  • compliance with the Copenhagen criteria;
  • the sustainability of political reforms and Croatia’s fulfilment of its obligations in respect of regional cooperation with the other countries of former Yugoslavia, and other related international obligations such as those relating to the ICTY;
  • the Council’s right to suspend negotiations by a qualified majority in the case of a serious breach of democracy, human rights, fundamental freedoms or the rule of law;
  • the principle of own merits, restricting the scope and duration of any transitional arrangements;
  • the establishment of a formal process for examination of the acquis;
  • a procedure for recommending the opening of negotiations after each chapter of the acquis is closed;
  • the pace of negotiations to be determined by Croatia’s transposition and proper implementation of the acquis;
  • benchmarks for the provisional closure of each chapter before opening negotiations;
  • Croatia fulfilling its commitments under the Stabilisation and Association Agreement before the provisional closure of each chapter.

Conclusions and recommendations

The Commission particularly emphasises the need for ongoing political dialogue with Croatia to address sensitive issues such as minority rights, refugee return, judicial reform and combating corruption. It also stresses the need for cooperation with the ICTY and regional cooperation with the Western Balkans.

BACKGROUND

Bulgaria and Romania are an integral part of the enlargement process launched in 1997. Negotiations with both countries are on the point of being concluded. January 2007 is the target date for their accession.

On 21 February 2003 Croatia submitted its official application for accession to the EU. In June 2004 the Council officially recognised Croatia as an accession candidate. The Council and the Commission consider that accession negotiations should start at the beginning of 2005. Meanwhile, the principles, priorities and conditions of the European partnership with Croatia are set out in Council Decision 2004/648/EC.

Related Acts

Treaty of Accession of Bulgaria and Romania signed on 25 April, [not yet published in the Official Journal]

Conclusions of the General Affairs and External Relations Council of 16 March 2005 on Croatia
The Council decided to postpone the opening of accession negotiations with Croatia indefinitely. The bilateral intergovernmental conference would be reconvened by common agreement as soon as the Council has established that Croatia is cooperating fully with the ICTY.

Council Regulation (EC) No 2257/2004 of 20 December 2004 amending Regulations (EEC) No 3906/89, (EC) No 1267/1999, (EC) No 1268/1999 and (EC) No 2666/2000 to take into account of Croatia’s candidate status [Official Journal L 389 of 30.12.2004]

Conclusions of the Brussels European Council of 16 and 17 December 2004

The European Council of December 2004 concluded that accession negotiations with Croatia should start on 17 March 2005 provided that Croatia fully cooperated with the ICTY, particularly regarding the arrest and transfer to the Hague of General Gotovina. Bulgaria and Romania’s Accession Treaty should be signed in April 2005.

Council and Commission Decision of 13 December 2004 concerning the conclusion of the Stabilisation and Association Agreement between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the Republic of Croatia, of the other part [Official Journal L 26 of 28.1.2005]

The SAA provides a contractual framework for relations between the EU and Croatia during the pre-accession phase in the following areas:

  • political dialogue;
  • regional cooperation;
  • the four freedoms for industrial and agricultural products;
  • approximation of Croatian legislation to the Community acquis;
  • cooperation in all areas of EU policy.

Communication from the Commission of 20 April 2004: Opinion on Croatia’s Application for Membership of the European Union [COM(2004) 257 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Civil society dialogue between the EU and candidate countries

Civil society dialogue between the EU and candidate countries

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Civil society dialogue between the EU and candidate countries

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement

Civil society dialogue between the EU and candidate countries

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions, of 29 June 2005, on civil society dialogue between the European Union and candidate countries [COM(2005) 290 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

Summary

The Commission aims to overcome the problem that arose during the previous enlargement of citizens being neither sufficiently informed nor prepared. It plans to strengthen contacts and exchange of experience, and ensure better mutual awareness and understanding by developing a civil society dialogue with Turkey and Croatia.

The Commission will employ the broadest definition possible of civil society *. Municipalities and other local communities will also be included in the dialogue.

The approach to dialogue employed in Croatia will be different to the one in Turkey. Greater emphasis will be placed on relations with the latter. The Commission proposes strengthening ongoing activities and complementing them with new ones.

Strengthening ongoing activities

Croatia

The EU has been working with Croatian civil society in the context of the stabilisation and association process (the Stabilisation and Association Agreement with Croatia entered into force on 1 February 2005). This dialogue benefits from Croatia’s participation in Community programmes such as the 6th RTD Framework Programme and Tempus.

Turkey

National and European institutions have already developed bilateral activities with Turkey which fall under the scope of the civil society dialogue.

The EU currently finances a number of activities aimed at:

  • developing civil society by means of a programme to strengthen the expansion of NGOs in Turkey, the European Initiative for Democracy and Human Rights EIDHR and the pre-accession financial assistance programme;
  • fostering close links with social partners and civil society organisations in the areas of social dialogue, employment and social affairs, with particular focus on labour law, gender equality and anti-discrimination;
  • enhancing Turkish participation in Community education and training programmes, namely Socrates, Youth and Leonardo da Vinci. Additional financing from the pre-accession funds is envisaged to complement the proposed programme grants. In the university sector, Turkish students studying to improve their expertise in the area of European integration benefit from the Jean Monnet Scholarship programme. The Commission intends to increase the scholarship funding allocation and look into other related initiatives, such as extending the programme to EU students wishing to study in Turkey;
  • supporting Marie Curie Actions which offer a set of structured mobility schemes for researchers. These actions are geared to the development and transfer of research competencies, the consolidation and widening of career prospects for researchers and the promotion of excellence in European research.

New activities

Dialogue will evolve over the long term in line with the needs expressed by civil society. The Commission expects the actors of civil society to play an active role in conducting the dialogue.

Croatia

Civil society dialogue in Croatia will evolve in the light of the deepening of EU-Croatia relations, the strengthening of regional cooperation and the further development of reconciliation with the region. The Commission would like to see dialogue focus on the practical impact of the accession process and proposes encouraging contacts between social partners, the media, NGOs and religious communities in the EU and Croatia.

Turkey

The Commission is planning a range of activities aimed at enhancing EU-Turkey relations in the area of:

  • long-term partnerships between organisations. The establishment of a grant scheme to assist Turkish civil society organisations in cofinancing bilateral exchange projects with counterparts based in the EU. This is aimed in particular at professional organisations and social partners. Priority will be given to projects encouraging sustainable relations between organisations;
  • gender equality. The EU aims to strengthen the position of women in Turkish society and to tackle other issues such as domestic violence. The Commission will seek to include gender equality and the equal opportunity dimension in all its activities;
  • business relations. This involves the creation of an EU-Turkey Business Council to operate as a forum of the main EU companies active in Turkey and their Turkish counterparts, with a view to acting as a link between European institutions and the local business associations in the interest of further developing trade and investments;
  • cooperation between local communities. The Commission wishes to support twinning between EU and Turkish cities and include local communities from remote and disadvantaged regions in activities implemented within the framework of the civil society dialogue. Turkey could participate in the Community ” Citizens for Europe ” programme proposed for 2007-2013, designed to promote active European citizenship;
  • youth, university and professional exchanges. The Commission will evaluate the efficiency of mechanisms implemented in this area and examine additional projects. It plans to encourage closer institutional cooperation between universities in the EU and in Turkey, in view of setting up independent academic institutions open to students from both sides and supporting joint research and publications;
  • culture and the media. The Commission will do its utmost to encourage an open public debate. Internet-supported platforms and a website will be set up for this purpose. The Commission will work with Member States’ cultural organisations to support activities targeting language learning and the promotion of interpretation and translation from and into Turkish. It will part-finance television programmes providing information on European and Turkish societies. Partnership projects between television companies from both sides aimed at producing joint programmes will also be supported. The Commission will give priority to direct contacts between professional organisations of journalists through the creation of a programme of seminars involving journalists from the EU and Turkey.

The Commission points out that civil society dialogue will also focus on religious issues and involve churches and other religious organisations or associations.

Implementation modalities

The Commission will conduct regular consultation of personalities from both sides, chosen on the basis of their expertise in EU-Turkey relations.

In principle, the proposed activities will be financed under the pre-accession assistance budget for the countries concerned, supplemented if necessary by contributions from public or private institutions and the Commission. As regards budgetary programmes, candidate countries provide a contribution, which is partly covered by pre-accession funding.

The Commission will use existing structures and resources in the implementation of projects whenever possible. It adds that the streamlining of visa procedures by Member States would be welcome as regards the Turkish participants in the dialogue.

Monitoring and reporting

The Commission will ensure a regular follow up of the activities and of their results. Information will be made available on the “Europa” Internet portal. Monitoring of EU-Turkey mutual perceptions in particular will be established to guide future policy.

Key terms used in the act
  • Civil society: all structures in society outside of government and public administration, whether based on a voluntary or mandatory membership (trade unions and employers federations, organisations representing a broad spectrum of social and economic actors, non-governmental organisations, grassroots organisations, religious communities and the media).

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Ongoing enlargement

Ongoing enlargement

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Ongoing enlargement

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement

Ongoing enlargement

The enlargement process is based on a certain number of principles and instruments which have been drawn up gradually, especially in the context of the fifth enlargement. Its objective is to prepare the candidate countries to assume the obligations deriving from Member State status. The Copenhagen criteria determine the conditions to be respected by the candidate countries: the political and economic criteria and the adoption and application of European legislation (acquis). This process requires considerable effort on the part of the candidate countries, which are judged on their own merits, especially in terms of strengthening institutions and reforms. The EU has therefore established various instruments to support and assist them and to evaluate their preparation and needs at each stage of the enlargement process.

ENLARGEMENT STRATEGY

  • The accession process for a new Member State
  • Enlargement Strategy 2011-2012
  • 2010-2011 Enlargement Strategy
  • Enlargement strategy 2009-2010
  • Enlargement Strategy 2007-2008
  • Enlargement strategy 2006-2007: challenges and integration capacity
  • Enlargement strategy 2005: roadmap for the Western Balkans
  • Progress with enlargement: Bulgaria, Romania and Croatia (2004)
  • Enlargement strategy and 2003 report on the candidate countries

CANDIDATE COUNTRIES

  • Turkey
  • Croatia
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia
  • Iceland
  • Opinion on Montenegro’s accession to the European Union

INSTRUMENTS

Financial assistance

  • Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA)
  • The operational priorities of the European Investment Bank
  • Overhaul for EU Solidarity Fund

Sectoral cooperation

  • Civil society dialogue between the EU and candidate countries
  • Black Sea Synergy
  • Cooperation with Non-EU Member Countries on nuclear safety
  • European Training Foundation (ETF)

TURKISH CYPRIOT COMMUNITY

  • Relations with the northern part of Cyprus

Relations with the northern part of Cyprus

Relations with the northern part of Cyprus

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Relations with the northern part of Cyprus

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement

Relations with the northern part of Cyprus

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 3 June 2003, “Ways of promoting economic development in the northern part of Cyprus and bringing it closer to the Union” [COM (2003) 325 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

In the absence of an overall settlement to the de facto partition of Cyprus, this communication proposes measures to promote the economy of the northern section of the island and bring it closer to the Union. Two types of measure are identified: financial assistance and trade.

Financial aid

In 2003, EUR 9 million in financial aid to promote economic development is to go to the following projects:

  • infrastructure projects in large towns of the northern part of the island;
  • grant aid to SMEs;
  • preparatory studies for integration of the northern section into the Union once a political solution to the partition of the island has been found;

In 2003 the Commission will step up its information work to bring Northern Cyprus closer to the Union; EUR 3 million will be allocated to the following activities:

  • organising seminars on the Community acquis for citizens of Northern Cyprus;
  • organising visits by Turkish Cypriot citizens to EU institutions;
  • consulting Cypriot authorities to find out how to encourage participation by citizens of the northern section in Community programmes;
  • cooperation with Member States;
  • support for civil society and social partners of the northern section;
  • continuation of the translation of the Community acquis into Turkish.

Trade

The communication proposes adoption of a system enabling products from Northern Cyprus to be exported under a preferential tariff system pursuant to the Association Agreement signed between Cyprus and the Union. Since 1994, non-acceptance of certificates issued by the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus has prevented exports from this part of the island from benefiting from the preferential customs treatment granted to the rest of Cyprus under the Association Agreement. Under the new system, the Cypriot Chamber of Commerce will be responsible for issuing certificates for the movement of goods produced or obtained in the northern part of the island.

Related Acts

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council – Annual Report 2006-2007 on the implementation of Community assistance under Council Regulation (EC) No 389/2006 of 27 February 2006 establishing an instrument of financial support for encouraging the economic development of the Turkish Cypriot community [COM(2007) 0536 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
This report follows the first year of the implementation of the economic assistance programme for the Turkish Cypriot community. The report is positive, in particular due to the strengthening of the administrative capacity. However, the programme duration was reduced from five years (2005-2009) to three years (2007-2009). The overall reduction in planning also means a reduction in the deadlines for awarding contracts.

Council Regulation (EC) No 389/2006 of 27 February 2006 establishing an instrument of financial support for encouraging the economic development of the Turkish Cypriot community and amending Council Regulation (EC) No 2667/2000 on the European Agency for Reconstruction [Official Journal L 65 of 07.03.2006].

FREE MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE, SERVICES AND GOODS

Communication from the Commission of 27 August 2008 – Annual Report on the implementation of Council Regulation (EC) 866/2004 of 29 April 2004 and the situation resulting from its application [COM(2008) 529 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The Commission considers that Regulation (EC) No 389/2006 constitutes an adapted legal framework. The number of people crossing the line doubled between 1 May 2007 and 30 April 2008, reaching the highest level since the green line was established. However, illegal immigration is still increasing. The flow of goods has increased by a third during the reporting period, despite the continuing obstacles to trade, particularly for goods originating in the northern part of the island, which is not under effective government control. The Regulation was amended on 16 June 2008, in order to facilitate trade between the two areas. The Commission shall continue to monitor the implementation of the Regulation.

Commission Decision 2007/330/ECof 4 May 2007 lifting prohibitions on the movement of certain animal products on the island of Cyprus under Council Regulation (EC) No 866/2004 and laying down conditions for the movement of those products (notified under document number C(2007) 1911) (Text with EEA relevance)[Official Journal L 123 of 12.5.2007].

Council Regulation (EC) No 866/2004 of 29 April 2004 on a regime under Article 2 of Protocol No 10 of the 2003 Act of Accession[Official Journal L 161 of 30.4.2004].
The areas where the Government of the Republic of Cyprus exercises effective control and those where they do not have effective control are separated by a line.

This line does not constitute an external border of the EU. This Regulation establishes the conditions under which checks on persons, goods and services crossing the line will be carried out.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Report from the Commission – [COM (2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report from the European Commission signals certain progress in the area of consumer protection and health. However, alignment with the acquis in certain areas still remains quite limited.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The acquis in this area covers protection of the economic interests of consumers in a number of specific sectors (misleading and comparative advertising, price indication, consumer credit, unfair contract terms, distance and doorstep selling, package travel, timeshare, injunctions for the protection of consumers’ interests, certain aspects of the sale of consumer goods and associated guarantees), as well as general safety of consumer goods (liability for defective products, dangerous imitations and general safety of goods) and distance marketing of consumer financial services. The Member States of the European Union (EU) must transpose the acquis into their national law, and establish administrative structures and independent implementation bodies which ensure real market surveillance and effective application of the acquis. They must also provide appropriate judicial and out-of-court dispute resolution mechanisms. Furthermore, they must ensure that consumers are informed and educated and that consumer organisations play an active role. This chapter also covers certain binding rules with regard to public health.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

There was some progress in the area of consumer and health protection. Efforts are still hampered by the limited financial resources and weak operational structures.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report noted insufficient progress in the area of consumer protection and market surveillance. In addition, the Report noted the lack of resources allocated to improving the health sector.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2009 report gives an account of progress concerning consumer protection, but the State is still lacking an effective and transparent system of market surveillance.

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report presents the progress achieved by the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia with a view to complete alignment with the Community acquis in the field of consumer protection. The main progress concerns the development of administrative capacity to ensure consumer protection. A new, more transparent and effective market surveillance system is not yet in place.

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

In its 2011 Report, the European Commission states that alignment with the acquis on the common commercial policy has progressed. Advancements in the field of foreign and security policy are also adequate.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

In this field the Community acquis mainly comprises directly binding legislation which does not require transposition into national law. EU legislation results from the Union’s multi-lateral and bi-lateral agreements on matters of trade policy as well as from a certain number of autonomous preferential trade measures. In the fields of development and humanitarian aid, Member States must comply with the relevant EU legislation and international commitments and equip themselves with the capacities required to participate in EU policies in these sectors. Candidate countries are invited to progressively align their policies with regard to third countries, and their positions within international organisations, with the policies and positions adopted by the Union and its Member States.

The Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) are based on legal acts, legally binding international agreements in particular, and on policy documents. The acquis comprises declarations, actions and policy agreements. Member States must be in a position to conduct political dialogue under the framework of the CFSP, to align with the EU’s declarations, to take part in EU action and to apply the appropriate sanctions and restrictive measures. Candidate countries are invited to progressively align with the EU’s declarations and to apply sanctions and restrictive measures if required.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Progress was made in the area of external relations, notably in the alignment towards the common commercial policy.

There was also progress in the area of foreign, security and defence policy. The country took measures to ensure better coordination between the competent authorities in the implementation of international restrictive measures. It aligned with all EU declarations and Council decisions and showed continued commitment to participate in civil and military and crisis management operations.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The situation presented by the 2010 Report is satisfactory. The country cooperates fully with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court. Furthermore, the country plays an active part in bilateral and regional cooperation initiatives, including for maintaining good neighbourly relations.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

In its 2011 Report, the Commission states that the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia has progressed in implementing the operational programme for regional development and human resources development.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

In the field of regional policy, the acquis essentially comprises framework regulations and implementing regulations which do not require transposition into national law. They define the rules applicable to the development, approval and implementation of the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund, which each reflect the territorial organisation of the country. These programmes are negotiated and agreed with the Commission, but their implementation is the responsibility of the Member States. When choosing and implementing projects, Member States must comply with Community legislation in general, for example in the areas of public procurement, competition and the environment. They must have a suitable institutional framework and administrative capacities to ensure that the programming, implementation, monitoring and assessment of projects are carried out in a rational and cost-effective manner with regards to management and financial control.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Some progress was noted in the area of regionaldevelopment and coordination of structural funds. There has been some progress in the implementation of the IPA components concerning operational programme for the regional development and human resources development. Inadequate expertise and insufficient institutional coordination has led to considerable delays. It is necessary to strengthen ownership of the programme implementation by the authorities.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its 2010 Report, the Commission indicated that additional efforts were required with regard to regional development and the coordination of structural funds. Implementation of the regional development programme had been significantly delayed.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enterprise > International dimension and enlargement

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report from the European Commission outlines satisfactory, but uneven progress in the area of enterprise and industrial policy.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU industrial policy seeks to promote industrial strategies which strengthen competitiveness by accelerating adaptation to structural changes and encouraging a framework conducive to the creation and development of enterprises across the EU and to national and foreign investment. It also seeks to improve the overall business environment in which small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operate. It presupposes a process of privatisation and restructuring (see also Chapter 8 – Competition policy). The European strategy in this area essentially involves defining fundamental principles and drawing up industrial policy declarations. The implementation of enterprise policy and industrial policy requires an adequate administrative capacity at national, regional and local level.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Progress was good but uneven in the field of enterprise and industrial policy. There have been some achievements in simplification of the legislation and administrative procedures for business operation and reduction of business costs. Enterprise support measures remain scattered within several programmes.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report presents the reforms and strategies which have enabled improvements to the business environment and support measures for the sector, in particular for the benefit of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report states that alignment with the acquis is relatively satisfactory, particularly with respect to the regulatory framework and sector policy. However, it highlights the necessity for further efforts in improving the business environment.


Another Normative about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report from the European Commission outlines satisfactory, but uneven progress in the area of enterprise and industrial policy.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU industrial policy seeks to promote industrial strategies which strengthen competitiveness by accelerating adaptation to structural changes and encouraging a framework conducive to the creation and development of enterprises across the EU and to national and foreign investment. It also seeks to improve the overall business environment in which small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operate. It presupposes a process of privatisation and restructuring (see also Chapter 8 – Competition policy). The European strategy in this area essentially involves defining fundamental principles and drawing up industrial policy declarations. The implementation of enterprise policy and industrial policy requires an adequate administrative capacity at national, regional and local level.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Progress was good but uneven in the field of enterprise and industrial policy. There have been some achievements in simplification of the legislation and administrative procedures for business operation and reduction of business costs. Enterprise support measures remain scattered within several programmes.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report presents the reforms and strategies which have enabled improvements to the business environment and support measures for the sector, in particular for the benefit of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report states that alignment with the acquis is relatively satisfactory, particularly with respect to the regulatory framework and sector policy. However, it highlights the necessity for further efforts in improving the business environment.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

  • Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

ADOPTION OF THE EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS

  • Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Employment and Social Policy
  • Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Economic and monetary affairs
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Competition
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Environment
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Information society and media
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Education and culture
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Taxation
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Transport
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Justice and security
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Internal market
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Research and new technologies