Category Archives: Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

At the beginning of the 2000s, the European Union introduced an initiative called ‘From the Farm to the Fork’ based on risk analysis and traceability, with the aim of guaranteeing food safety. In line with this approach, foodstuffs are monitored at all susceptible stages of the production chain, in order to make sure that strict hygiene rules are adhered to. The EU also regulates on the trade in animals and animal products between Membe States and with third countries. The EU and its Member States have a number of instruments at their disposal to ensure that these checks are carried out properly, such as the European Food Safety Authority or the TRACES system (TRAde Control and Expert System).

Intra-Community trade of bovine animals and swine

Intra-Community trade of bovine animals and swine

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade of bovine animals and swine

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade of bovine animals and swine

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 64/432/EEC of 26 June 1964 on animal health problems affecting intra-Community trade in bovine animals and swine [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Directives apply to intra-Community trade in bovine animals or swine for breeding, production or slaughter.

The transport of bovine animals and swine to another Member State is only authorised if the animals:

  • do not display any clinical sign of disease;
  • have not been obtained from a holding subject to prohibition for animal health reasons;
  • are identified in accordance with the provisions of Directive 2008/71/EC for swine and in accordance with the provisions of Regulation (EC) No 1760/2000 for bovine animals;
  • are accompanied by a health certificate (see Annex F) during transport to the country of destination;
  • come from a bovine herd officially free of tuberculosis, brucellosis or enzootic bovine leukosis (this condition only affects bovine animals).

During transport the animals must not come into contact with other animals which do not conform to the same health conditions.

Furthermore, the vehicles used to transport animals must guarantee their well-being and meet the following additional conditions. They must:

  • be designed in such a way as to prevent the dispersal of droppings, litter or fodder;
  • be cleaned and disinfected after each transportation of animals, in line with the methods and procedures approved by the competent authority;
  • hold a register including information on the location, date and time of the loading and delivery of animals, the type and quantity of animals transported, the length of the journey, the date and location of when the vehicle was disinfected, etc. This information must be kept for at least three years.

In accordance with animal health requirements, animals for slaughter, which have been transported directly to an abattoir on their arrival in the destination country, must be slaughtered within the 72 hours following their arrival. If the animals are transported directly to an approved assembly centre on their arrival in the destination country before being transported to the abattoir, their slaughter must take place within the three working days following their arrival in the assembly centre.

A Member State which has a national control programme for one of the contagious diseases not referred to in Annex E for the whole or part of its territory may submit the said programme to the Commission.

REFERENCES

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition into the Member States Official Journal
Directive 64/432/EEC

30.06.1964

30.06.1965

 L 121 of 29.07.1964

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition into the Member States Official Journal

Directive 80/1098/EEC

20.11.1980

1.7.1981

OJ L 325 of 1.12.1980

Directive 80/1274/EEC

31.12.1980

1.1.1981

OJ L 375 of 31.12.1980

Directive 81/476/EEC

1.7.1981

OJ L 186 of 8.07.1981

Directive 82/61/EEC

10.2.1982

1.1.1982

OJ L 29 of 6.02.1982

Directive 82/893/EEC

29.12.1982

1.1.1983

OJ L 378 of 31.12.1982

Directive 83/336/EEC

30.6.1984

OJ L 177 of 4.7.1984

Directive 84/643/EEC

30.06.1984

30.09.1985 (Ireland – United Kingdom)

OJ L 339 of 27.12.1984

Directive 84/644/EEC

30.09.1985

OJ L 339 of 27.12.1984

Directive 85/586/EEC

24.12.1985

01.01.1986

OJ L 372 of 31.12.1985

Directive 87/231/EEC

10.04.1987

OJ L 99 of 11.04.1987

Directive 87/489/EEC

30.10.1987

31.12.1988

OJ L 280 of 03.10.1987

Directive 89/662/EEC

22.12.1989

31.12.1991

31.12.1992 (for Greece)

OJ L 395 of 30.12.1989

Directive 90/423/EEC

26.7.1990

1.1.1992

OJ L 224 of 18.08.1990

Directive 90/425/EEC

26.7.1990

1.7.1992

OJ L 224 of 18.08.1990

Directive 91/687/EEC

19.11.1992

1.1.1992 (for Article 1 point 3 and Article 2 point 1)

1.7.1992 (for all other articles)

OJL 377 of 31.12.1991

Directive 92/65/EEC

29.7.1992

1.1.1994

OJ L 268 of 14.9.1992

Directive 92/102/EEC

08.12.1992

1.2.1993 (registration of bovine animals according to national measures)
1.10.1993 (Community system of registering bovine animals)
1.1.1994 (swine)
1.1.1995 (ovine and caprine)

OJ L 355 of 5.12.1992

Directive 97/12/EC

25.4.1997

30.6.1998

OJ L 109 of 25.4.1997

Directive 98/46/EC

15.7.1998

30.6.1999

OJ L 198 of 15.7.1998

Directive 98/99/EC

31.12.1998

1.1.1999 (Article 2)

1.7.1999 (Article 1)

OJ L 358 of 31.12.1998

Directive 2000/15/EC

3.5.2000

OJ L 105 of 3.5.2000

Directive 2000/20/EC

4.7.2000

1.12.1999

OJ L 163 of 4.7.2000

Regulation (EC) No 535/2002

13.4.2002

OJ L 80 of 23.3.2002

Regulation (EC) No 1226/2002

29.7.2002

OJ L 179 of 9.7.2002

Regulation (EC) No 21/2004

29.1.2004

OJ L 5 of 9.1.2004

Regulation (EC) No 1/2005

25.1.2005

OJ L 3 of 5.1.2005

Decision 2006/911/EC

29.12.2006

OJ L 346 of 9.12.2006

Directive 2006/104/EC

1.1.2007

OJ L 363 of 20.12.2006

Decision 2007/729/EC

OJ L 294 of 13.11.2007

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.10.2010

OJ L 219 of 14.8.2008

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 64/432/EEC have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated version  is for reference purpose only.

Related Acts

Commission Decision 2008/185/EC of 21 February 2008 on additional guarantees in intra-Community trade of pigs relating to Aujeszky’s disease and criteria to provide information on this disease [Official Journal L 59 of 4.3.2008].
See consolidated version

Commission Decision 2004/558/ECOfficial Journal L 249 of 23.07.2004 of 15 July 2004 implementing Council Directive 64/432/EEC as regards additional guarantees for intra-Community trade in bovine animals relating to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and the approval of the eradication programmes presented by certain Member States.
See consolidated version

Commission Decision 2003/467/EC of 23 June 2003 establishing the official tuberculosis, brucellosis, and enzootic-bovine-leukosis-free status of certain Member States and regions of Member States as regards bovine herds [Official Journal L 156 of 25.6.2003].
See consolidated version

Intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals

Intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 91/68/EEC of 28 January 1991 on animal health conditions governing intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The animal health conditions governing intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals are laid down by Directive 91/68/EEC. This Directive, which has been amended several times, establishes the guarantees regarding animal health required for trade between the Member States. However, the circulation of animals within a Member State is not covered by these rules.

Minimum health conditions

Ovine and caprine animals may only be traded with another Member State if they meet the following conditions:

  • the animals are identified and registered;
  • the animals present no clinical sign of disease during the veterinary inspection (the inspection is held in the 24-hour period prior to the day of loading);
  • the animals are not intended for slaughter under a scheme for eradication of disease;
  • the animals do not originate from a holding subject to prohibition on grounds of health (brucellosis, rabies, anthrax);
  • the animals are not subject to animal health measures under European legislation for the control of foot-and-mouth disease. They have not been vaccinated against foot-and-mouth disease either;
  • the animals are born and reared on EU territory or come from an authorised third country in accordance with European legislation;
  • the animals are kept for a minimum pre-determined period;
  • prior to their dispatch, the animals have not been in contact with other ovine or caprine animals (during the 21 days before dispatch), nor with other ungulates (during the 30 days before dispatch);
  • the animals are dispatched as quickly as possible in order to reduce any risk of contamination.

Additional health conditions

Additional conditions apply to ovine and caprine animals being sent for fattening, reproduction and animal husbandry. In the last two cases the Directive lays down additional controls for certain diseases including Maedi Visna, caprine viral arthritis/encephalitis, contagious agalactia or paratuberculosis.

Financing national programmes

Community financing may be used to help implement national programmes for the control of foot-and-mouth disease, brucellosis, contagious epididymitis in rams, anthrax and rabies. Financing is granted where the programmes in question are approved by the Commission.

Assembly centres

Assembly centres where the ovine and caprine animals are separated into consignments must respect certain animal health conditions and be inspected regularly by the competent authorities. Furthermore, a registration and approval system for animal dealers ensures adequate sanitary conditions during trading and, where applicable, during the time spent by animals on their own premises.

All the assembly centres are registered. Each one receives a veterinary registration number. The list of assembly centres and their veterinary registration numbers is regularly updated by the Member States. The latter then transmit these details to the other Member States and the public.

Transport of animals

The transport of animals, in particular vehicle hygiene, the isolation of transported animals and animal health certificates must also comply with certain criteria laid down in the Directive.

Inspections

The competent authority in each Member State carries out regular inspections whilst ensuring compliance with this Directive.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 91/68/EEC

4.2.1991

Articles 7 and 8: 4.4.1991
Other: 31.12.1992

OJ L 46, 19.2.1991

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2001/10/EC

20.6.2001

30.6.2001

OJ L 147, 31.5.2001

Directive 2003/50/EC

9.7.2003

30.6.2004

OJ L 169, 8.7.2003

Regulation (EC) No 806/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122, 16.5.2003

Directive 2006/104/EC

1.1.2007

OJ L 363, 20.12.2006

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2009

OJ L 219, 14.8.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 91/68/EC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis of documentary value only.

Related Acts

Commission Decision 93/52/EEC of 21 December 1992 recording the compliance by certain Member States or regions with the requirements relating to brucellosis (B. melitensis) and according them the status of a Member State or region officially free of the disease [Official Journal L 13 of 21.1.1993].

Placing on the market of aquaculture animals and products

Placing on the market of aquaculture animals and products

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Placing on the market of aquaculture animals and products

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Placing on the market of aquaculture animals and products

The European Union has created a secure monitoring framework for placing on the market and importing aquaculture animals and products. This framework is based on the approval of disease-free regions and on categorising different types of diseases to which different health rules will apply.

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 91/67/EEC of 28 January 1991 concerning the animal health conditions governing the placing on the market of aquaculture animals and products [See amending acts]

Summary

This Directive creates a framework designed to overcome obstacles to trade in aquaculture animals while at the same time avoiding the spread of infectious diseases, particularly in disease-free regions of the European Union.

This framework is based on the identification of zones or farms that are free from serious endemic disease. The Directive lays down the criteria and procedures for the granting, maintenance, suspension, restoration and withdrawal of approval of such zones and farms.

It also stipulates the documents required for transport within these zones: aquaculture animals and products must be accompanied by a movement document and a health certificate.

The Directive also lays down Community rules applying to importation from non-member countries in order to protect the health of aquaculture animals in the Member States.

The diseases and the animals likely to be affected are set out in three separate lists:

  • an exotic disease, infectious salmon anaemia, for which all infected fish are destroyed as quickly as possible and any suspected cases of infection lead to a ban on animal movements not authorised by a veterinarian;
  • four serious endemic diseases which must be eradicated in the long term: infectious haematopoietic necrosis and viral haemorrhagic septicaemia for fish, and bonamiosis and marteiliosis for molluscs;
  • some less dangerous diseases for which control and eradication measures are less stringent.

This Directive will be repealed and replaced from 1 August 2008 by Council Directive 2006/88/EC (see “Related Acts” below).

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 91/67/EEC 04.02.1991 01.01.1993 OJ L 46 of 19.02.1991
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 93/54/EEC 30.06.1993 OJ L 175 of 19.07.1993
Directive 95/22/EC 31.10.1995 30.06.1996 OJ L 243 of 11.10.1995
Directive 97/79/EC 19.02.1998 30.06.1999 OJ L 24 of 30.01.1998
Directive 98/45/EC 03.07.1998 30.06.1999 OJ L 189 of 03.07.1998
Regulation (EC) No 806/2003 05.06.2003 OJ L 122 of 16.05.2003

Related Acts

2006/88/EC of 24 October 2006 on animal health requirements for aquaculture animals and products thereof, and on the prevention and control of certain diseases in aquatic animals [Official Journal L 328 of 24.11.2006].

This Directive repeals and replaces, as of 1 August 2008, the rules concerning animal health requirements for aquaculture animals and products as well as measures for the prevention and control of diseases affecting fish and molluscs. This legislation needs to be updated to take account of developments within the industry, the experience gained and scientific advances in this field, and to bring it into line with international agreements and standards.

Commission Decision 2003/390/EC of 23 May 2003 establishing special conditions for placing on the market of aquaculture animals species considered not susceptible to certain diseases and the products thereof [Official Journal L 135 of 3.6.2003].

Commission Decision 1999/567/EC of 27 July 1999 laying down the model of the certificate referred to in Article 16(1) of Council Directive 91/67/EEC [Official Journal L 216 of 14.8.1999].

See the rules of the hygiene package.

 

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 89/556/EEC of 25 September 1989 on animal health conditions governing intra-Community trade in and importation from third countries of embryos of domestic animals of the bovine species [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Directive lays down animal health conditions for trade between Member States in embryos of domestic cattle and imports from third countries.

Intra-Community trade in embryos is limited to those complying with conditions concerning conception, collection, processing, storage and certification. The embryos must be accompanied during transport by a health certificate certifying that they conform to this Directive.

The Directive envisages a system for approving the embryo collection and production teams in the Member States and in third countries. Each team is registered by the competent authority of the country concerned and receives a veterinary registration number.

The list of embryo collection and production teams and their veterinary registration number is regularly updated by the Member States. The latter then communicate the list to the other Member States and the public.

Imports of embryos from third countries are restricted to a list of authorised countries to be drawn up by a procedure provided for by Article 18 with regard to certain criteria (the health of the livestock, information on contagious diseases, prevention and combating animal diseases, the structure of veterinary services, the guarantees provided, etc.).

The Directive provides for safeguard and control measures in the country of collection and the country of destination.

REFERENCES

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 89/556/EEC

29.9.1989

1.1.1991

OJ L 302, 19.10.1989

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 90/425/EEC

26.7.1990

26.9.1990

OJ L 224, 18.8.1990

Directive 93/52/EEC

19.7.1993

31.12.1993

OJ L 175, 19.7.1993

Regulation (EC) No 806/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122, 16.5.2003

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.1.2010

OJ L 219, 14.8.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 89/556/EEC have incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis for reference only.

RELATED ACTS

Commission Decision 2006/168/EC of 4 January 2006 establishing the animal health conditions and the veterinary certification requirements for imports into the Community of bovine embryos and repealing Decision 2005/217/EC [Official Journal L 57 of 28.2.2006].

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine semen

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine semen

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine semen

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine semen

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 88/407/EEC of 14 June 1988 laying down the animal health requirements applicable to intra-Community trade in and imports of semen of animals of the bovine species [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Directive lays down the animal health conditions applicable to trade in and imports into the European Union (EU) of fresh and frozen semen of animals of the bovine species.

Intra-Community trade

Each Member State must ensure that the semen sent from its territory to that of another Member State satisfies the following conditions:

  • it must have been collected, processed and/or stored in one of the approved collection or storage centres. These centres must meet a range of technical characteristics and be placed under official surveillance of a veterinarian (Annex A);
  • it must have been taken from healthy animals which satisfy a number of conditions. For example, these animals must come from herds of officially tuberculosis, brucellosis and enzootic bovine leukosis free status, they must have been subjected to a period of quarantine of at least 28 days and they must not have been vaccinated against foot-and-mouth disease within 12 months prior to collection;
  • it must be accompanied, during transport, by an animal health certificate corresponding to the model contained in this Directive (Annex D).

Imports from third countries

Bovine semen may be imported only from the third countries detailed on list of the authorised countries listed. It must come from collection and storage centres which are approved for import into the EU.

Semen from Non-EU Member Countries may be imported only if:

  • it complies with the animal health requirements affecting intra-Community trade of animals of the bovine species; and
  • it is accompanied by an animal health certificate drawn up by an official veterinarian of the country of collection.

Collection and storage centres

The Commission’s veterinary experts must regularly control the collection and storage centres situated in the Community and in Non-EU Member Countries, in cooperation with local experts.

All sperm collection and storage centres are registered. Each one receives a veterinary registration number. The list of sperm collection and storage centres and their veterinary registration numbers is regulated updated by Member States. The latter then inform the other Member States and the public.

Committee procedure

In managing animal health requirements applicable to trade in bovine semen, the Commission is assisted by the Standing Committee on the Food Chain and Animal Health.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 88/407/EEC

11.8.1988

1.1.1990

OJ L 194, 22.7.1988

Amending act(s) Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 90/425/EEC

7.9.1990

26.9.1990

OJ L 224, 18.8.1990

Directive 93/60/EEC

17.8.1993

1.7.1994

OJ L 186, 28.7.1993

Directive 2003/43/EC

11.6.2003

1.7.2004

OJ L 143, 11.6.2003

Regulation (EC) No 806/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122, 16.5.2003

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

OJ L 219, 14.8.2008

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 88/407/EEC have been incorporated into the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purposes only.

Related Acts

Commission Decision 2004/639/EC of 6 September 2004 laying down the importation conditions of semen of domestic animals of the bovine species [Official Journal L 292 of 15.9.2004].

Commission Decision 2007/240/EC of 16 April 2007 laying down new veterinary certificates for importing live animals, semen, embryos, ova and products of animal origin into the Community pursuant to Decisions 79/542/EEC, 92/260/EEC, 93/195/EEC, 93/196/EEC, 93/197/EEC, 95/328/EC, 96/333/EC, 96/539/EC, 96/540/EC, 2000/572/EC, 2000/585/EC, 2000/666/EC, 2002/613/EC, 2003/56/EC, 2003/779/EC, 2003/804/EC, 2003/858/EC, 2003/863/EC, 2003/881/EC, 2004/407/EC, 2004/438/EC, 2004/595/EC, 2004/639/EC and 2006/168/EC [Official Journal L 104 21.4.2007].

Intra-Community trade in and imports of porcine semen

Intra-Community trade in and imports of porcine semen

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade in and imports of porcine semen

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade in and imports of porcine semen

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 90/429/EEC of 26 June 1990 laying down the animal health requirements applicable to intra-Community trade in and imports of semen of domestic animals of the porcine species [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Directive lays down the animal health requirements applicable to trade in and imports of semen of animals of the porcine species in the European Union (EU).

Intra-Community trade

Intra-Community trade in porcine semen requires compliance with regulations concerning collection, processing, storage and transport as well as provisions on protection against the spread of Aujesky’s disease.

The Directive lays down that each Member State shall send the list of authorised semen collection centres and their veterinary registration numbers to the other Member States and to the Commission. It also lays down that each consignment of semen must be accompanied by an animal health certificate drawn up by an official veterinarian of the Member State of collection.

Imports from third countries

Imports of porcine semen must come from:

  • a country on the list of third countries authorised to export to the EU, and
  • an approved semen collection centre in one of these countries.

Member States shall authorize the import of semen only on submission of an animal health certificate drawn up and signed by an official veterinarian of the third country of collection. The semen must fulfil the animal health requirements adopted for imports of semen from those countries.

Precautionary and control measures

The protective measures laid down by Directive 90/425/EEC apply to intra-Community trade in porcine semen.

The control measures provided for in Directive 90/425/EEC and in Directive 97/78/EC also apply to the trade in porcine semen. They concern controls on the origin, organisation and monitoring of porcine semen.

The Commission’s veterinary experts may carry out on-the-spot checks in cooperation with the competent authorities in the Member States and third countries. These controls ensure application of the Directive.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for implementation in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 90/429/EEC

12.7.1990

30.12.1991

OJ L 224, 18.8.1990

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for implementation in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 806/2003

5.6.2003

OJ L 122, 16.5.2003

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.1.2010

OJ L 219, 14.8.2008

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 90/429/EEC have been incorporated into the original text. This consolidated versionis of documentary value only.

Related Acts

Commission Decision 2009/893/EC of 30 November 2009 on importation of semen of domestic animals of the porcine species into the Community as regards lists of third countries and of semen collection centres, and certification requirements [Official Journal L 320 of 5.12.2009].

Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 92/65/EEC of 13 July 1992 laying down animal health requirements governing trade in and imports into the Community of animals, semen, ova and embryos not subject to animal health requirements laid down in specific Community rules referred to in Annex A(I) to Directive 90/425/EEC [See amending acts].

Summary

The Directive lays down the animal health requirements for the trade and import in the European Union (EU) of live animals, sperm, ova and embryos which are not covered by specific Community legislation (as is already the case for cattle and swine, equidae, sheep and goats, poultry and hatching eggs, certain live ungulates, as well as for aquaculture products).

Species covered by the Directive

The Directive lays down the animal health requirements applicable to trade in zoo animals, ungulates and birds which are not covered by other specific Directives, camelidae, bees, lagomorphs, minks, foxes, etc., as well as the trade in pet animals such as cats, dogs and ferrets. In order to be the subject of trade, ferrets, cats and dogs must meet the conditions provided for in Regulation (EC) No 998/2003 on the non-commercial movement of pet animals. For the latter category of animals, Finland, Ireland, Malta, the United Kingdom and Finland require additional guarantees. They may, for example, in certain cases, keep their national rules on quarantine for animals susceptible to rabies.

The Directive also lays down the animal health requirements applicable to trade in semen, ova and embryos of certain animals like equidae, sheep and goats.

Controls and penalties

Checks are carried out in accordance with the provisions of Council Directive 90/425/EEC applicable to intra-Community trade in live animals and their sperm, ova and embryos.

The Member States must take administrative or penal measures to penalize infringements of the Directive.

Live animals and their sperm, ova and embryos covered by this Directive and coming from third countries are subject to the minimum requirements laid down in Directive 97/78/EEC CEE concerning veterinary checks applicable to products from third countries.

Authorised imports

Imports from third countries are authorized provided they offer guarantees equivalent to those required in intra-Community trade. Conditions concerning the veterinary certificate, checks and transport are laid down, and animals must be quarantined prior to importation.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 92/65/EEC

29.7.1992

1.1.1994

OJ L 268 of 14. 9. 1992

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 998/2003

3.7.2003

OJ L 146 of 13. 6. 2003

Directive 2004/68/EC

20.5.2004

19.11.2005

OJ L 139 of 30.4. 2004

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.1.2010

OJ L 219 of 14.8.2008

AMENDMENTS TO THE ANNEXES

Annex A – Notifiable diseases
Regulation (EC) No 1282/2002 [Official Journal L 187 of 16.7.2002];
Regulation (EC) No 1398/2003 [Official Journal L 198 of 6.8.2003].

Annex C – Conditions governing approval of bodies, institutes or centres
Decision 95/176/EC [Official Journal L 117 of 24.5.1995];
Regulation (EC) No 1282/2002 [Official Journal L 187 of 16.7.2002].

Annex D – Conditions governing semen collection and storage centres and embryo collection and production teams
Decision 95/176/EC [Official Journal L 117 of 24.5.1995];
Regulation (EU) No 176/2010 [Official Journal L 52 of 3.3.2010].

Annex E – Health certificate templates
Regulation (EC) No 1282/2002 [Official Journal L 187 of 16.7.2002];
Decision 2010/270/EU [Official Journal L 118 of 12.5.2010];
Decision 2010/684/EU [Official Journal L 293 of 11.11.2010].

Annex F – Trade and imports of animals, sperm, ova and embryos not subject to specific legislation
Directive 2004/68/EC [Official Journal L 139 of 30.4.2004].

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EU) No 206/2010 of 12 March 2010 laying down lists of third countries, territories or parts thereof authorised for the introduction into the European Union of certain animals and fresh meat and the veterinary certification requirements [Official Journal L 73 of 20.3.2010].

Commission Regulation (EC) No 1739/2005 of 21 October 2005 laying down animal health requirements for the movement of circus animals between Member States [Official Journal L 279 of 22.10.2005].

TRACES system

TRACES system

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about TRACES system

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

TRACES system

Document or Iniciative

Commission Decision 2003/623/EC of 19 August 2003 concerning the development of an integrated computerised veterinary system known as TRACES.

Summary

The trade control and expert system (TRAde Control and Expert System – TRACES) created a single central database for monitoring the movements of animals and products of animal origin both within the European Union (EU) and those coming from outside of the EU.

Features

The main features of TRACES are:

  • electronic transmission of information;
  • centralised management of the statutory reference data;
  • interoperability with other information systems;
  • multilingualism.

Objectives

The aims of the TRACES system are as follows to:

  • improve the quantity and quality of information on animal movements;
  • improve the exchange of information between the national and European authorities;
  • provide a system of electronic veterinary certificates which enables commercial operations to obtain information on-line;
  • produce lists of establishments from countries outside of the EU which are authorised to export products of animal origin to the EU;
  • manage consignments rejected at EU borders;
  • target controls on public and animal health and animal welfare (particularly during their transport, etc.);
  • centralise the evaluation of potential risks of an epidemic;
  • overcome linguistic difficulties by making information from other countries more accessible;
  • integrate all the operators concerned by putting in place a system for implementing operations related to exchanging documents between economic operators and competent authorities.

Functioning

Economic operators may be integrated into TRACES, subject to being registered by the competent authority to which they are linked. When they wish to transport animals, they must fill in an electronic form in a standardised format which contains all the appropriate information concerning the animal or product of animal origin, the destination and any stages.

In the case of intra-European trade in animals or products of animal origin, the information will be forwarded to the competent authority of the Member State of origin. After having checked the content of the form, the authority may reject or validate the transport. Where appropriate, it will issue the health certificate and the route plan relating to the animals’ welfare in the official languages of the Member State of origin and of destination. The private operator may only carry out the transport if they have received authorisation.

In the case of import or transit of animals or products of animal origin from outside of the EU, it is the official at the border inspection post who checks the animals or products and the veterinary import documents is responsible for entering the relevant information in the TRACES database, including the decision on whether to grant entry or refuse access to EU territory, and for issuing a Common Veterinary Entry Document (CVED).

All this information is sent to the veterinary authority of the Member State of destination, to the central veterinary authority of the country or countries of transit and to all appropriate control points. It can then be consulted during checks carried out en route and/or at the destination. This information may also be consulted by the economic operators registered in the database. The system is available to users free of charge.

Context

The TRACES system replaces several previously separate systems, notably ANIMO and SHIFT. ANIMO was established to monitor the movements of live animals and to exchange information between the national and Community authorities. In order to improve the health security of imported animals and products of animal origin from outside of the EU, an information system called SHIFT was established. SHIFT was composed of two other systems: the SML system for generating list of establishments authorised to export to the EU and the RCS system for managing the consignments refused entry at the EU border. Replacing these different systems with the single TRACES system will avoid duplication, whilst also simplifying the monitoring of animal movements and making it more efficient.

The European Commission is responsible for controlling the TRACES system, for developing and maintaining it, whereas the ANIMO system was based on a contract between the Member States and a private company. The Court of Auditors asked the Commission to take on this responsibility in the wake of problems encountered during the classical swine fever crisis in 1997.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Decision 2003/623/EC

28.08.2003

OJ L 216, 28.08.2003

Production and marketing of eggs and chicks

Production and marketing of eggs and chicks

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Production and marketing of eggs and chicks

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Production and marketing of eggs and chicks

The EU sets out rules for marketing and transporting chicks and eggs for hatching and for incubating eggs.

Proposal

Proposal of 16 November 2006 for a Council Regulation on the production and marketing of eggs for hatching and of farmyard poultry chicks.

Summary

The purpose of the proposed Regulation is to set out rules for marketing and transporting chicks and eggs for hatching, and for incubating hatching eggs.

The proposal does not cover small-scale operations, i.e. pedigree breeding and breeding establishments with less than 100 birds, and hatcheries with a capacity of less than 1 000 hatching eggs.

The establishments covered by the proposal have to register with their competent national authority, which then sends the information to the other Member States and the Commission.

Obligations as regards eggs for hatching

Operators must, among other things:

  • individually mark hatching eggs that will be used for supplying chicks;
  • transport hatching eggs in clean packs that contain eggs from only one species, one category and one type of poultry, originating in one establishment, and that bear the words “eggs for hatching ” in at least one Community language;
  • refrain from using for human consumption eggs that have been withdrawn from an incubator.

In addition, every hatchery has to record certain information (dates, distinguishing number and quantities) by species, category and type, and report to the national authority each month how many hatching eggs it has incubated and how many chicks it has hatched. The Member States then forward this information to the Commission.

For exports, certain additional details can be required. Eggs may be imported only if they are marked clearly and legibly with the name of the country of origin and the words “eggs for hatching”, and are presented appropriately (i.e. eggs of the same category, species and type, from the same country of origin and sender, with certain details on the packaging).

Obligations as regards chicks

Chicks have to be packed by species, type and category of poultry. Boxes may contain chicks from one hatchery only and must bear the hatchery’s reference number.

Imports must also comply with these rules and be transported in boxes containing chicks from one country of origin and one sender only, and bearing certain details.

Accompanying document

Movements of hatching eggs and chicks have to be accompanied by a document showing, for each consignment, the following minimum details:

  • the name or business name and address of the establishment, and its distinguishing number (or, in the case of imports, the country of origin);
  • the number of eggs for hatching or chicks, set out by species, category and type of poultry;
  • the date of dispatch;
  • the name and address of the consignee.

Background

The proposal seeks to consolidate and replace Regulation (EEC) No 2782/75: the change is one of form, aimed at bringing together the original regulation and subsequent amendments in one act, without altering the basic provisions.

References And Procedure

Proposal Official Journal Procedure
COM(2006) 694 Consultation CNS/2006/231

Related Acts

of 15 October 1990 on animal health conditions governing intra-Community trade in, and imports from third countries of, poultry and hatching eggs [Official Journal L 303 of 31.10.1990].

The purpose of this Directive is to promote trade in poultry and hatching eggs within the Community by ironing out differences in animal health conditions between Member States and avoiding the spread of animal diseases.

of 29 October 1975 on the common organisation of the market in eggs [Official Journal L 282 of 1.11.1975].
The common market organisation (CMO) for eggs ensures stable prices and a reasonable standard of living for farmers by helping in the marketing of their produce and laying down arrangements for trade with other countries. Agricultural support, including the eggs CMO, underwent a complete overhaul with the June 2003 reform of the common agricultural policy (CAP) and the introduction of the single payment system. Eligible producers can now receive direct payments regardless of their level of production.

Veterinary checks, animal health rules, food hygiene

Veterinary checks, animal health rules, food hygiene

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Veterinary checks, animal health rules, food hygiene

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Veterinary checks, animal health rules, food hygiene

At the beginning of the 2000s, the European Union introduced an initiative called ‘From the Farm to the Fork’ based on risk analysis and traceability, with the aim of guaranteeing food safety. In line with this approach, foodstuffs are monitored at all susceptible stages of the production chain, in order to make sure that strict hygiene rules are adhered to. The EU also regulates on the trade in animals and animal products between Membe States and with third countries. The EU and its Member States have a number of instruments at their disposal to ensure that these checks are carried out properly, such as the European Food Safety Authority or the TRACES system (TRAde Control and Expert System).

CONTROLS AND FOOD HYGIENE RULES

Hygiene package

  • Food hygiene
  • Hygiene for food of animal origin
  • Official controls on products of animal origin intended for human consumption

Additional acts

  • Food and feed safety
  • Official feed and food controls
  • Animal health rules governing the production, processing, distribution and introduction of products of animal origin for human consumption

INFORMATION EXCHANGES AND VERIFICATION MECHANISMS

  • TRACES system
  • CIS system
  • SHIFT system
  • Mutual assistance between national administrations
  • Training of food safety control authorities

IMPORTS FROM THIRD COUNTRIES AND INTRA-COMMUNITY TRADE

General provisions

  • Imports of products
  • Checks on the imports of live animals
  • Imports of products of animal origin
  • Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos
  • Veterinary and zootechnical checks of animals and products of animal origin for intra-Community trade
  • Animal health and public health: other products of animal origin
  • Marketing of pure-bred animals

Specific provisions – Cattle

  • Intra-Community trade of bovine animals and swine
  • Intra-Community trade in bovine pure-bred breeding animals
  • Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine embryos
  • Intra-Community trade in and imports of bovine semen
  • Placing on the market and administration of bovine somatotrophin
  • Identification and labelling of beef and veal

Specific provisions – Pigs

  • Identification and registration of pigs
  • Intra-Community trade in and imports of porcine semen
  • Intra-Community trade in breeding pigs

Specific provisions – Ovine and caprine animals

  • Identification and registration of ovines and caprines
  • Intra-Community trade in ovine and caprine animals
  • Intra-Community trade in pure-bred breeding sheep and goats

Specific provisions – Bird species

  • Bird imports
  • Intra-Community trade in poultry and hatching eggs
  • Production and marketing of eggs and chicks

Specific provisions – Equidae

  • Intra-Community movement and importation of equidae
  • Intra-Community trade in equidae and their semen, ova and embryos
  • Competitions and intra-Community trade in equidae

Specific provisions – Meat and meat-based products

  • Prohibition on administering hormones (and other substances) to farm animals
  • Monitoring substances having a hormonal action and other substances in animals and animal products

Other specific provisions

  • Non-commercial movements of pet animals
  • Imports and transit of certain ungulate animals
  • Raw milk and dairy products
  • Untreated and Heat-treated milk
  • Animal health requirements for aquaculture animals and products thereof
  • Placing on the market of aquaculture animals and products