Category Archives: Mediterranean partner countries

GENERAL FRAMEWORK
Framework for relations
Partnership for democracy and prosperity with the Southern Mediterranean
Barcelona Process: Union for the Mediterranean
Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements
Pan-Euro-Mediterranean system of cumulation of origin
Barcelona Process: Euro-Mediterranean Partnership
Tenth anniversary of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership
The Valencia Ministerial Conference and its Action Plan
Reinvigorating the Barcelona process
Barcelona Declaration and Euro-Mediterranean partnership
EU Common Strategy for the MediterraneanArchives
European Neighbourhood Policy
New neighbourhood policy strategy
Taking stock of the European Neighbourhood Policy
Neighbourhood policy: participation in European Union Agencies and programmes
FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (2007 – 2013)
Euro-Mediterranean Regional Strategy and Indicative Programme 2007-2013
Inter-regional programme: Strategy paper 2007-2013 and indicative programme 2007-2010
Cross-border cooperation (CBC) 2007-2013
Common framework for joint multiannual programming
MEDA programmeArchives
Financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza StripArchives
SECTORAL COOPERATION
Human rights and relations in the Mediterranean
Environment strategy for the Mediterranean
Euro-African Partnership for infrastructure
Cooperation with Non-EU Member Countries on nuclear safety
European Training Foundation (ETF)
Combating HIV/AIDS in the European Union and neighbouring countries (2009-2013)
Action on HIV/AIDS in the European Union and neighbouring countries 2006 – 2009

Euro-African Partnership for infrastructure

Euro-African Partnership for infrastructure

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Euro-African Partnership for infrastructure

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Euro-African Partnership for infrastructure

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 13 July 2007 – Interconnecting Africa: the EU-Africa partnership on infrastructure [COM(2006) 376 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Infrastructure in Africa: state of play

Limited access to transport, telecommunications, and energy and drinking-water services constitutes an important obstacle to reducing poverty and achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Africa. The development of suitable infrastructure and related services will make it possible to increase economic growth and stimulate trade and regional integration.

African transport systems remain underdeveloped, the movement of persons and goods being based essentially on road transport, with its insufficient connections and services. The continent’s energy potential, while high, is not used efficiently. Water resources are unequally distributed and subject to significant seasonal fluctuations; moreover, most of the population does not have access to drinking water and to basic sanitation. Lastly, access to telecommunications services is costly and patchy, with the African digital divide being the highest in the world.

In the 1990s, African governments and European Union (EU) Member States gradually reduced the resources allocated to developing infrastructure in the continent. More investment is therefore needed. The EU intends to pursue the progress that has already been made thanks to cooperation between the Commission, African governments and other donors. For example, the development of trade and regional economic integration have benefited from the improvement of the primary road network and seaports.

A partnership for meeting challenges

Faced with these challenges, the EU is launching a partnership with Africa for the development of large infrastructure networks in the continent. The partnership is based on the EU strategy for Africa and on the objectives defined by the short-term action plan in the field of infrastructure (i-STAP) of the African Union (AU) and NEPAD (New Partnership for Africa’s Development).

The partnership is based mainly on infrastructure allowing interconnection at continental and regional level in Africa, namely:

  • transport (road and railway networks, ports, maritime and river routes, air transport), in order to reduce costs and improve the quality of services;
  • water and sanitation networks, in order to improve the management of water resources at local, national and cross-border basin level, and also access to drinking water and adequate sanitation facilities;
  • energy, in order to allow network extension, distribution in rural areas and improvement of cross-border connections;
  • information and communication technologies (ICT), to ensure adequate access to affordable technologies by supporting regulatory reform, capacity building and broadband infrastructure development.

The partnership supports physical infrastructure investment, institutional development measures and capacity building, as well as support measures for the political and regulatory framework at national level.

Africa could also benefit from the experience acquired by the EU through the development of Trans-European Networks (TENs) of regional infrastructure, in particular, the methodology for identifying priority projects and the principles for consensus-building on the harmonisation of regulatory frameworks.

Partnership operations are guided by a desire for coherence between investments at continental and regional level and national strategies for the development of infrastructure and combating poverty. The partnership therefore functions at three levels:

  • at the continental level, UA-NEPAD coordinates continental and regional priority setting;
  • at the regional level, regional indicative programmes support the policy and regulatory frameworks accompanying physical investments;
  • at the national level, UA-NEPAD and EU delegations jointly supervise national actions contributing to the achievement of partnership objectives.

The funding of operations under the partnership is based on several instruments:

  • the regional and national allocations under the 10th European Development Fund (EDF), i.e. €5.6 billion. This amount represents a significant increase in the resources allocated thus far by the EDF to African infrastructures (€3.75 billion under the 9th EDF);
  • intra-ACP resources, including those allocated through the energy and water facilities.
  • the new fiduciary fund set up by the EU and the European Investment Bank (EIB), aimed at cross-border infrastructure investments in particular. This fund is co-financed by the Commission, the Member States concerned and European and African financial development institutions. During the initial phase (2006-2007), the fund was credited with €87 million, which will be allocated in the form of grants from the Community and Member States, and another €260 million to be allocated in the form of loans by the EIB.

In order to ensure the success of the partnership, effective coordination between the Commission, Member States and other international initiatives and organisations such as the World Bank and the EIB is necessary. This coordination should bolster ownership of projects by beneficiaries, in particular through political commitment by governments to applying good governance in all infrastructure sectors. Private sector participation in the partnership is also encouraged.


Key figures of the Act
  • Total population of Africa with no access to drinking water: 42 %.
  • Total population with no access to basic sanitation: 60 %.
  • Total population with no access to electricity: more than 80%.
  • Total potential hydroelectric capacity converted into electricity: 7 %.

Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements

Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements

Acts

Decision 2006/356/EC, Decision 2005/690/EC, Decision 2004/635/EC, Decision 2002/357/EC, Decision 2000/384/EC, Decision 2000/204/EC, Decision 98/238/EC, concerning the conclusion of a Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an association between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and, respectively, the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria, the Arab Republic of Egypt, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, the State of Israel, the Kingdom of Morocco and the Republic of Tunisia.

Summary

The Euro-Mediterranean partnership between the European Union (EU) and the countries of the Southern Mediterranean began in 1995 by the Barcelona process. The political, economic and social partnership is based on the principles of reciprocity, solidarity and co-development.

Under this framework, the Association Agreements have been adopted between the EU, the Member States and the Mediterranean country partners. These bilateral agreements replace the first generation of agreements, i.e. the cooperation agreements of the 1970s.

Adherence to democratic principles and fundamental rights are an essential element of the association agreements.

Although they are bilateral agreements and provide for specific arrangements with each partner State, the association agreements share a similar structure. They are intended to promote the following:

  • regular dialogue on political and security matters, in order to promote mutual understanding, cooperation and joint initiatives;
  • economic, trade and financial cooperation, aimed in particular at gradual trade liberalisation, sustainable development of the region and investment;
  • social and cultural cooperation and on educational matters, in particular through intercultural dialogue, migration control, developing qualifications, promoting labour law and gender equality.

In addition, the agreements encourage intra-regional cooperation between the Mediterranean countries, as a factor for peace, stability and economic and social development.

Towards a free trade area

The association agreements provide for the gradual establishment of a Mediterranean free trade area in accordance with the rules of the World Trade Organization (WTO). This free trade area shall be established after a transitional period of twelve years following the entry into force of the agreements. However, free trade between the EU and Israel already exists.

The free movement of goods between the EU and the Mediterranean countries is to result from:

  • the gradual removal of customs duties;
  • the prohibition of quantitive restrictions on exports and imports, and any similar or discriminatory measures between the parties.

The rules will have particular relevance for imports of industrial products and trade in agricultural products, processed or otherwise, and fisheries products.

Safeguard measures may, however, be applied if they are in the public interest, or to protect economic sectors that are particularly vulnerable.

Regarding the right of establishment and the supply of services, the parties reaffirm their commitments under the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). In addition, the partners must promote the full liberalisation of the capital sector as soon as the necessary conditions are in place.

Lastly, a mechanism for regulating trade disputes shall be gradually established.

Institutional provisions

Institutional structures are set up under each association agreement. An Association Council, organised at ministerial level, takes decisions and makes recommendations so that fixed objectives can be attained, while an Association Committee manages the agreement and settles differences regarding its application and interpretation.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 2006/356/EC, Lebanese Republic

1.4.2006

OJ L 143 of 30.5.2006

Decision 2005/690/EC, People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria

1.9.2005

OJ L 265 of 10.10.2005

Decision 2004/635/EC, Arab Republic of Egypt

1.6.2004

OJ L 304 of 30.9.2004

Decision 2002/357/EC, Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

1.5.2002

OJ L 129 of 15.5.2002

Decision 2000/384/EC, State of Israel

1.6.2000

OJ L 147 of 21.6.2000

Decision 2000/204/EC, Kingdom of Morocco

1.3.2000

OJ L 138 of 9.6.2000

Decision 98/238/EC, Republic of Tunisia

1.3.1998

OJ L 97 of 30.3.1998

Related Acts

  • Algeria

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an Association between the European Community and its Member States, of the one part, and the People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria, of the other part [OJ L 265 of 10.10.2005].

  • Palestinian Authority

Euro-Mediterranean Interim Association Agreement on trade and cooperation between the European Community, of the one part, and the Palestine Liberation Organization for the benefit of the Palestinian Authority of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, of the other part, [OJ L 187 of 16.7.1997].
The Euro-Mediterranean Interim Association Agreement is intended to apply to the parties until a Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreement is concluded. It is mainly concerned with non-political aspects of trade and cooperation between the parties.

  • Egypt

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an Association between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the Arab Republic of Egypt, of the other part [OJ L 304 of 30.9.2004].

  • Jordan

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an Association between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, of the other part [OJ L 129 of 15.5.2002].

  • Israel

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an association between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the State of Israel, of the other part [OJ L 147 of 21.6.2000].

  • Lebanon

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an Association between the European Community and its Member States, of the one part, and the Republic of Lebanon, of the other part [Official Journal L 143 of 30.5.2006].

  • Morocco

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an association between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the Kingdom of Morocco, of the other part [OJ L 070, 18.3.2000].

  • Tunisia

Euro-Mediterranean Agreement establishing an association between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the Republic of Tunisia, of the other part [OJ L 97 of 30.3.1998].

This summary is for information only. It is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document, which remains the only binding legal text.

Barcelona Declaration and Euro-Mediterranean partnership

Barcelona Declaration and Euro-Mediterranean partnership

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Barcelona Declaration and Euro-Mediterranean partnership

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Barcelona Declaration and Euro-Mediterranean partnership

Document or Iniciative

Final Declaration of the Barcelona Euro-Mediterranean Ministerial Conference of 27 and 28 November 1995 and its work programme.

Summary

The European Union (EU) establishes a multilateral cooperation with the countries of the Mediterranean basin. This partnership represents a new phase in their relationship. For the first time it addresses economic, social, human, and cultural aspects and questions of common security.

This partnership became a reality with the adoption of the Barcelona Declaration by the EU Member States and the following 12 Mediterranean non-member countries (MNCs): Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Morocco, the Palestinian Authority, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey. The League of Arab States and the Arab Maghreb Union (AMU) (FR) were invited, as was Mauritania as a member of the UMA.

The partnership is based on a spirit of solidarity, with due regard for the characteristics specific to each of the participants. It supplements the other activities and initiatives undertaken in the interests of the peace, stability and development of the region.

Political and security partnership

The first objective of the partnership is to promote the emergence of a common area of peace and stability in the Mediterranean. This objective is to be achieved through multilateral political dialogue, in addition to the bilateral dialogues provided for by the Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements. The partners therefore undertake to:

  • respect human rights and fundamental principles by applying the principles of the United Nations Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and international law, and and to exchange information in these areas;
  • respect the principles of the rule of law and democracy, while recognising the right of each partner to choose and freely develop its own political, socio-cultural, economic and judicial system;
  • respect the sovereignty of States, the equal rights of peoples and their right to self-determination;
  • respect territorial integrity, the principles of non-intervention in internal affairs and the peaceful settlement of conflicts;
  • combat terrorism, organised crime and drug trafficking;
  • promote regional security, eliminate weapons of mass destruction, and adhere to international and regional nuclear non-proliferation regimes, as well as arms control and disarmament agreements.

The partners support the fair, comprehensive and sustainable settlement of conflicts in the Middle East, founded specifically on the resolutions of the UN Security Council.

Economic and financial partnership

The sustainable and balanced socio-economic development of the MNCs should lead to the establishment of an area of shared prosperity in the Mediterranean.

The reforms should enable the creation of Free Trade Areas (FTAs) which involves the gradual elimination of customs barriers (taxation and non-taxation) to trade in manufactured products. The partners also envisage a gradual liberalisation of agricultural products and services.

The establishment of Euro-Mediterranean FTAs is included in the Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements and the Free Trade Agreements between the MNCs. These agreements are concluded in accordance with the rules of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

The partners define priorities for facilitating the establishment of the FTA:

  • adopting a customs system of cumulation of origin of goods;
  • adapting competition rules, the certification of economic operators and the protection of intellectual property rights;
  • developing the market economy, the private sector, technology transfer, and the economic integration of the MNCs;
  • modernising economic and social structures, and promoting programmes for the benefit of the neediest populations;
  • promoting free trade, harmonising customs rules and procedures, and eliminating unwarranted technical barriers to trade in agricultural products.

In addition, the economic cooperation undertaken by the partners aims to:

  • promote private savings and investments, including direct foreign investment;
  • encourage regional cooperation between the MNCs;
  • create a favourable environment for industry and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs);
  • achieve sustainable management of the environment, energy, natural resources and fish stocks;
  • promote the role of women in the economy;
  • modernise agriculture.

The partners must also set cooperation priorities for transport infrastructures, the development of information technologies and the modernisation of telecommunications.

Lastly, the partners must increase their financial cooperation and the EU must increase its financial assistance, specifically in the form of loans from the European Investment Bank (EIB).

Social, cultural and human partnership

The partners cooperate with the aim of developing human resources, and promoting understanding between cultures and exchanges between civil societies.

To this end, the Barcelona Declaration and its work programme emphasise:

  • the importance of intercultural dialogue, and of dialogues between religions;
  • the importance of the role the media can play in the reciprocal recognition and understanding of cultures;
  • cultural exchanges, knowledge of other languages, implementation of educational and cultural programmes that respect cultural identities;
  • the importance of health and social development and respect for fundamental social rights;
  • the participation of civil society in the Euro-Mediterranean partnership and strengthening cooperation between regional and local authorities;
  • combating illegal immigration, terrorism, drug trafficking, international crime and corruption.

Context

The Barcelona Declaration provides for periodic meetings of the Ministers for Foreign Affairs of the Mediterranean partners and the EU. These Euro-Mediterranean Conferences are prepared by the Euro-Mediterranean Committee for the Barcelona process, which is also responsible for monitoring the process and the cooperation priorities.

EU Common Strategy for the Mediterranean

EU Common Strategy for the Mediterranean

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about EU Common Strategy for the Mediterranean

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

EU Common Strategy for the Mediterranean

This Strategy, which builds on the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (Barcelona process), pursues cooperation between the EU, the Mediterranean region and Libya in a vast range of areas including security, democracy, justice and the economy. The objective is promote peace, stability and prosperity in the region. It was initially planned to run for four years up to 2004 but has been extended to January 2006.

Acts

Common Strategy 2000/458/CFSP of the European Council of 19 June 2000 on the Mediterranean region [See amending acts]

Summary

The Strategy covers all the EU’s relations with all it partners in the Barcelona process and with Libya. It was initially adopted for four years (expiring on 23 July 2004) but was extended by the European Council on 5 November 2004 until 23 January 2006.

In view of the Mediterranean region’s strategic importance for the European Union and the challenges it faces, the EU considers the two sides must work together as partners with a common vision and mutual respect. The principle of partnership implies active support by both sides to develop good neighbourly relations, improve prosperity, eliminate poverty, promote and protect fundamental freedoms, encourage cultural and religious tolerance, and develop cooperation with civil society including NGOs. The European Union will do so by supporting the Euro-Mediterranean partnership and contributing to the consolidation of peace in the Middle East.

Objectives

The European Union’s goal is to help secure peace, stability and prosperity in the region. Its objectives also include promotion of core values such as human rights, democracy, good governance, transparency and the rule of law. Social, cultural and human affairs also play a role in promoting mutual understanding. Free trade, closer cooperation in the field of justice and home affairs, greater security through cooperation to promote peace and dialogue to combat intolerance, racism and xenophobia are further objectives.

Efforts will also be undertaken to enhance coordination, coherent and complementarity between the EU and its Member States and between its Mediterranean policy and policies for other partners.

Areas of action

On the political and security front, the Union will strengthen dialogue at all levels through cooperation and exchange of information in order to establish a common area of peace and stability. Conflict prevention and other issues such as anti-personnel mines are other central issues of concern. The EU also attaches great importance to the signature and ratification of non-proliferation instruments and the establishment of a Middle East zone free of weapons of mass-destruction and nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.

On democracy, human rights and the rule of law, it is essential to strengthen democratic institutions and to promote good governance and accession to international human rights instruments. In more concrete terms the Union would like to see the death penalty abolished in the region.

In the economic and financial field implementation of the Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements to promote the progressive liberalisation of trade is the principal objective in strengthening the private sector and making the region more attractive to investors. Appropriate trade policies, accession by partners to the World Trade Organisation on the right terms, support for subregional cooperation and greater South-South trade are also goals. The Union will not neglect the need for interconnection of infrastructure, improved water management strategies and the creation of a market economy with a social dimension.

The impact of financial cooperation under the MEDA Regulation will be maximised through coordination of national and Community strategies, enhanced economic dialogue and coherent use of all the resources available.

Environmental concerns will also be taken into account to ensure sustainable economic development.

The core social issues are participation by civil society and NGOs in the partnership, cooperation to promote equal opportunities for men and women and dialogue. On the cultural side, the aim is to improve education and vocational training particularly for young people and women.

There are a number of issues in the justice and home affairs area. Migration is one of them. The EU intends to simplify visa issue procedures, combat illegal migration networks, ensure more effective border control, reduce the causes of migration and help ensure the integration into society of all persons residing legally in the Community and prevent their double taxation. There must be a review of the legal systems, and in particular civil law problems relating to the laws of succession and family law, including divorce, to make them more transparent and predictable. Refugees and measures to combat crime are two other European concerns in this area. Compliance with the Geneva Convention and accession to the United Nations Convention are also desirable.

Instruments and means

The Council and the Commission ensure the consistency, unity and effectiveness of the Union’s action. The Council and its Presidency are assisted by the Secretary-General of the Council/High Representative for Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP). Member States make appropriate and coordinated use of the instruments and means at their disposal.

The programmes, instruments and policies have to be reviewed by the Council, the Commission and Member States to maintain consistency. They must also make full and appropriate use of the instruments and means available and make greater efforts to coordinate and cooperate particularly within regional and international organisations.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Common Strategy 2000/458/CFSP 22.07.2000 OJ L 183 of 22.07.2000
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 2004/763/CFSP 13.11.2004 OJ L 337 of 13.11.2004

Related Acts

by the Euro-Mediterranean Ministerial Conference in Barcelona on 27 and 28 November 1995 and its work programme.

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 6 September 2000 to prepare the fourth meeting of Euro-Mediterranean foreign ministers ” reinvigorating the Barcelona process” [COM(2000) 497 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 13 February 2002 to prepare the meeting of Euro-Mediterranean foreign ministers in Valence on 22 and 23 April 2002 [SEC(2002) 159 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 21 May 2003, “Reinvigorating EU actions on human rights and democratisation with Mediterranean partners – Strategic guidelines” [COM(2003) 294 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Reinvigorating the Barcelona process

Reinvigorating the Barcelona process

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Reinvigorating the Barcelona process

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Reinvigorating the Barcelona process

To assess the current state of the Barcelona process and establish a new action framework in order to reinvigorate the Euro-Mediterranean partnership.

2) Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and European Parliament of 6 September 2000 to prepare the fourth meeting of Euro-Mediterranean foreign ministers « reinvigorating the Barcelona process » [COM(2000) 497 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

3) Summary

This communication forms one stage in the implementation of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership, in accordance with the European Union’s common strategy on the Mediterranean adopted during the European Council meeting in Santa Maria da Feira in June 2000. It forms the foundation of the position adopted by the European Union (EU) during the meeting of Euro-Mediterranean foreign ministers in November 2000 in Marseilles.

The Commission aims to reinvigorate the relations between the European Union and the Mediterranean partners in order to achieve the goals set out in the Barcelona Declaration of 1995, namely to create an area of peace and stability based on respect for fundamental rights, to create an area of shared prosperity and to help improve mutual understanding among the peoples of the region.

The Barcelona process aims to promote the relations between the EU and the countries and territories of the Mediterranean Basin. Established in 1995, it is a regional framework bringing partners together at both technical and political level to promote and develop their common interests. This multilateral process is underpinned by a network of bilateral relations between each Mediterranean partner and the EU, embodied in Association Agreements.

Since the launch of this process, a new spirit of partnership has been built and, despite the ebb and flow of the Middle East peace process, numerous ambitious projects have been carried out to encourage cooperation. In total, the EU has mobilised nearly EUR 9 billion in grant and loan funding during the 1995-1999 period.

However, the ambitious goals of the Barcelona process have come up against several problems:

  • the difficulties encountered in the Middle East peace process have slowed the progress of the work and limited the development of cooperation;
  • the process of negotiation and ratification of the Association Agreements has been slower than expected;
  • the spirit of partnership has not always led to the expected results particularly in the area of human rights;
  • some partners have been reluctant to apply the specified economic transition policy;
  • the volume of South-South trade is still very low and the levels of investment in some countries remain below the forecasts (inadequate legal and technical adaptation, lack of transparency in trade);
  • the implementation of the MEDA programme has been hampered by procedural problems.

However, the Commission considers that the basic strategy agreed at Barcelona and the main instruments available are still valid. As a result, it intends to revitalise the Barcelona process in light of the experience gained in order to give it another chance of succeeding. Several proposals were made in this respect during the Ministerial Conference in Marseilles in November 2000.

As regards the Association Agreements, the countries of the Mediterranean Basin which have not already done this must be persuaded to rapidly conclude the negotiations. It must be guaranteed that any subsequent Association Agreement will be ratified by the Member States of the European Union within two years of signature.

In trade terms, for each country that has signed the Association Agreement, the reciprocal trade liberalisation measures that may be adopted must be examined closely and the greatest possible coherence in trade relations with the other partners must be sought. The Commission also encourages all the partners to join the World Trade Organisation and to create a free trade area between them. Any country signing an Association Agreement should undertake to conclude a free trade agreement with the other signatories of an Association Agreement within five years of its conclusion. A timetable should be established with the partners for the « single market » type harmonisation measures to be adopted in certain priority sectors (rules of origin, customs issues, standards and intellectual property). This programme should be ready for implementation from 2004.

Financially, the Commission proposes to make future financial contributions conditional on the efforts made by the partners in concluding the Association Agreements and on the necessary political and economic reforms. In addition, the granting of financial aid would depend on the progress made in democracy and human rights. Further efforts should be made to reinforce the effectiveness of the regional cooperation programmes.

In terms of political cooperation, a Euro-Mediterranean Charter for Peace and Stability should institutionalise the existing political dialogue and establish the mechanisms allowing the security and stability problems in the region to be tackled.

11. Finally, a new programme aimed at raising the awareness of both the Member States and the partner countries should be launched to improve understanding of the Barcelona process, particularly by introducing a new « Euro-Mediterranean partnership » label for the projects undertaken.

4) Implementing Measures

5) Follow-Up Work

The fourth Euro-Mediterranean Conference was held in Marseilles on 15 and 16 November 2000. It brought together the foreign ministers of the fifteen Member States and of Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Malta, Morocco, Tunisia, the Palestinian Authority and Turkey. Libya and Syria refused to take part. Also present were Mr Solana, High Representative for the CFSP and Secretary-General of the Council, Mr Patten, Commissioner, and, as special guests, representatives from Libya, the Arab League, Mauritania and the Arab Maghreb Union.

The Conference resulted in « formal conclusions » of the French presidency.

The ministers noted with great interest the proposals for revitalising the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership put forward by the Commission in its Communication on « Reinvigorating the Barcelona process » and the contributions made by the Mediterranean partners.

On the political and security partnership, the ministers confirmed the special importance they attached to the draft Euro-Mediterranean Charter for Peace and Stability but they decided to defer its adoption owing to the political context. However, they reaffirmed the need to reinforce the political dialogue, to deepen this in the areas of terrorism and migration and to extend this to other areas such as security, disarmament, the rule of law and human rights.

On the economic and commercial partnership, while reaffirming the objective of creating a free trade area by 2010, the participants decided to step up the dialogue on the macroeconomic environment, structural reforms and the economic liberalisation of the partners. They also underlined the importance for those countries having signed an Association Agreement with the EU of concluding free trade agreements amongst themselves within five years and of developing the initiatives contributing to attaining that objective, including the introduction of diagonal cumulation between countries with identical rules of origin and committed to concluding a free trade agreement between themselves. The emphasis was placed on the value of establishing an indicative timetable for the adoption of harmonisation measures in certain priority sectors, enabling partner countries to benefit fully from the Euro-Mediterranean market.

As regards the social, cultural and human partnership, the ministers recommended taking greater account of the social effects of the economic transition in national programmes by placing the emphasis on training, employment, professional requalification and the reform of education systems. They advocated building up existing programmes in the cultural area, such as Euromed Heritage and Euromed-Audiovisual, and also launching Euromed-Human Sciences. In addition, they recommended intensifying dialogue on migration and human exchanges. The preparation of a regional programme in the field of justice and home affairs was also recommended. Finally, the ministers encouraged players from civil society to take a full part in the regional programmes.

On financial cooperation, the participants advocated efficient financial cooperation targeted towards the major challenges of the partnership through the MEDA programme. This instrument must be closely linked to the implementation of reforms initiated under the Association Agreements and must take account of the special characteristics of each partner.

In addition, the ministers recommended strengthening the subregional dimension of the partnership by encouraging the introduction of development and economic integration initiatives between the countries and territories of the south side of the Mediterranean.

Finally, the ministers decided to establish a communication and information programme and a Euro-Mediterranean label intended to increase public awareness in the partnership region.

MEDA programme

MEDA programme

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about MEDA programme

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

MEDA programme

To implement the cooperation measures designed to help Mediterranean non-member countries reform their economic and social structures and mitigate the social and environmental consequences of economic development.

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1488/96 of 23 July 1996 on financial and technical measures to accompany (MEDA) the reform of economic and social structures in the framework of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership [Official Journal L 189 of 30.07.1996].

Summary

1. The MEDA Regulation is the principal instrument of economic and financial cooperation under the Euro-Mediterranean partnership. It was launched in 1996 (MEDA I) and amended in 2000 (MEDA II). It enables the European Union (EU) to provide financial and technical assistance to the countries in the southern Mediterranean: Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Morocco, the Palestinian Territory, Syria, Tunisia and Turkey. The MEDA programme takes the place of the various bilateral financial protocols that exist with the countries in the Mediterranean basin. It is inspired by the Phare and TACIS programmes, especially as regards transparency and information. A budget heading is established for financing the programme.

2. Actions under the MEDA programme aim to fulfil the objectives of the three sectors of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership:

  • reinforcing political stability and democracy;
  • creating a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area and the development of economic and social cooperation;
  • taking due account of the human and cultural dimension.

Measures supported

3. The MEDA programme supports the economic transition of Mediterranean non-member countries (MNCs) and the establishment of a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area by promoting economic and social reforms for the modernisation of enterprises and the development of the private sector, paying particular attention to:

  • support for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) and job creation;
  • the opening-up of markets;
  • promotion of private investment, industrial cooperation and trade between the various partners;
  • upgrading of economic infrastructure, including the financial and taxation systems;
  • consolidation of the major financial balances and creation of an economic environment favourable to accelerated growth (support for structural adjustment).

4. The MEDA programme also supports sustainable socio-economic development, in particular through:

  • the participation of civil society and populations in the planning and implementation of development measures;
  • the improvement of social services (education, health, housing, water, etc.);
  • harmonious and integrated rural development, including agricultural development;
  • the strengthening of democracy, human rights and the rule of law;
  • the protection and improvement of the environment;
  • the upgrading of economic infrastructure, especially in the sectors of transport, energy and the information society;
  • the promotion of youth exchanges and cultural cooperation;
  • the development of human resources (vocational training, improvement of scientific and technological research).

5. In addition, MEDA supports regional, sub-regional and cross-border cooperation, in particular through:

  • the establishment and development of structures for regional cooperation between Mediterranean partners and between them and the EU and its Member States;
  • the establishment of the infrastructure necessary for regional trade in the areas of transport, communications and energy;
  • exchanges between civil society in the Community and the Mediterranean partners within the framework of decentralised cooperation through the networking of civil society actors (universities, local communities, associations, trade unions, the media, private business, non-governmental organisations, etc.).

6. The Regulation stresses that the programming and implementation of cooperation must take account of gender equality and the promotion of the role of women in economic and social life. The measures financed under the Regulation must also give due regard to environmental considerations.

7. According to the MEDA Regulation, respect for democracy, the rule of law, human rights and fundamental freedoms is an essential element of the partnership, the violation of which justifies the adoption of appropriate measures. These measures can be adopted by the Council acting by a qualified majority on a Commission proposal.

Financing

8. In order to achieve its objectives, the MEDA II programme was allocated EUR 5 350 million for the 2000-2006 period.

9. The activities financed under MEDA may take the form of technical assistance, training, institution-building, information, seminars, studies, projects for investment and action designed to highlight the Community nature of the assistance.

10. In particular, MEDA financing takes the form of:

  • grants managed by the European Commission and used to finance or cofinance activities, projects or programmes that contribute to the realisation of the MEDA programme’s objectives;
  • risk capital provided and managed by the European Investment Bank (EIB) to strengthen the private sector, especially the financial sector;
  • interest rate subsidies for EIB loans within the framework of environmental cooperation, not exceeding a subsidy rate of 3%.

11. Community financing may cover expenditure on import of goods and services and local expenditure needed to carry out the projects and programmes envisaged. Taxes, duties and charges are excluded from Community financing. Direct financial assistance for the partner country may also be granted to support economic reform programmes within the framework of structural adjustment programmes.

12. Community financing in the production sector is combined with the beneficiary’s own resources. The amount provided by the EU should not exceed 80% of the total investment costs. Community financing may also take the form of cofinancing with other bodies.

13. The beneficiaries of MEDA financing may include not only states and regions but also local authorities, regional organisations, public agencies, local communities, organisations supporting business, private operators, cooperatives, mutual societies, associations, foundations and non-governmental organisations in the EU and the Mediterranean partners.

Programming

14. The Commission plays an important role in ensuring the effective coordination of the assistance efforts undertaken by the Community, including the EIB, and individual Member States, in order to increase the coherence and complementarity of their cooperation programmes. In addition, the Commission promotes coordination and cooperation with international financial institutions and other donors.

15. Measures financed under the MEDA programme are selected taking account of the beneficiaries’ priorities, evolving needs, absorption capacity and progress towards structural reform. The provisions of association or cooperation agreements are also taken into consideration.

16. Strategy papers covering the 2000-2006 period are drawn up at national and regional level in liaison with the EIB. These strategy papers aim to define the objectives of cooperation in the long term and determine the priority areas of action.

17. National Indicative Programmes (NIPs) and Regional Indicative Programmes (RIPs) covering a three-year period are then drawn up on the basis of the strategy papers and agreed by the EU and each Mediterranean partner. These programmes define the main objectives of, the guidelines for, and the priority sectors of Community support together with factors for the evaluation of the programmes. The programmes include indicative amounts and list the criteria for funding the programme concerned. They may be updated annually and adapted to changes in each partner country.

18. Finally, financing decisions are drawn up annually on the basis of the national and regional indicative programmes in liaison with the EIB. They contain a list of the projects to be financed.

Procedures

19. The strategy papers, indicative programmes and financing decisions are adopted by the Commission, according to the management procedure, following consultation of the MED Committee, composed of representatives of the Member States and chaired by the Commission representative. For greater efficiency, financing decisions totalling less than EUR 2 million are taken by the Commission, which then informs the MED Committee immediately.

20. Decisions on interest rate subsidies are taken by the Commission, which informs the EIB of any such decisions. The EIB decides on the allocation of risk capital following approval by a committee composed of representatives of the Member States and informs the Commission accordingly.

21. The actions and programmes financed under MEDA are subject to the award of contracts through tendering procedures which are open on equal terms to all natural and legal persons in the EU Member States and the Mediterranean partners. The Commission ensures the necessary transparency and effective competition in the award of these contracts and maximum dissemination of the relevant information through the Official Journal of the European Communities and the Internet.

22. Contracts are awarded in accordance with the relevant provisions of the EC Financial Regulation, taking into account the principles of sound financial management, economy and cost-effectiveness.

Monitoring and evaluation

23. In addition to an overall assessment report and a mid-term evaluation, the Commission, in collaboration with the EIB, submits an annual report to the European Parliament and the Council summarising the actions financed during the year and assessing the results obtained in relation to the strategy papers. This assessment is now included in the Commission’s annual report on EC development policy and the implementation of external aid (2001 report) [PDF ].

24. No later than 31 December 2005, the Commission must submit to the Council an evaluation report accompanied by proposals regarding the future of the MEDA programme with a view to its review by the Council.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1488/96 2.8.1996 OJ L 189 of 30.7.1996
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 780/98 18.4.1998 OJ L 113 of 15.4.1998
Regulation (EC) No 2698/2000 15.12.2000 OJ L 311 of 12.12.2000
Regulation (EC) No 2112/2005 28.12.2005 OJ L 344 of 27.12.2005

Related Acts

Regulation (EC) No 1638/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 2006 laying down general provisions establishing a European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument [Official Journal L 310 of 9.11.2006].

This Regulation repeals the MEDA programme.

Council Decision of 23 January 2006 enabling countries covered by the European Neighbourhood Policy, as well as Russia, to benefit from the Technical Assistance and Information Exchange (TAIEX) Programme [Official Journal L 32 of 4.2.2006].

The Valencia Ministerial Conference and its Action Plan

The Valencia Ministerial Conference and its Action Plan

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The Valencia Ministerial Conference and its Action Plan

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

The Valencia Ministerial Conference and its Action Plan

To extend and strengthen the decisions of the Marseilles Ministerial Conference and to present initiatives in order to pursue and develop the Euro-Mediterranean partnership in all its aspects.

2) Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council and European Parliament of 13 February 2002 to prepare the meeting of Euro-Mediterranean foreign ministers in Valencia on 22 and 23 April 2002 [SEC(2002) 159 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

3) Summary

In this communication, the Commission starts by summarising the progress made in the context of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership. This progress consists in particular of developing the grid of Association Agreements with the Mediterranean partners, making progress towards the creation of a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area, refocusing the MEDA programme on strategic objectives, furthering MEDA regional cooperation and maintaining the political dialogue.

The communication contains a series of recommendations covering the areas of political and security cooperation, freedom, justice and governance, social, cultural and human dimensions, civil society, economic and financial partnership and a reform of the institutional device for managing the partnership.

In terms of the political and security partnership, the Commission proposes to reinforce the political dialogue by holding meetings at political director level. It is also favourable to intensifying the fight against terrorism, through the available international instruments, and to defining a joint approach and a Euro-Mediterranean information and cooperation network. Human rights and democracy within the Mediterranean partner countries should also be promoted, particularly by raising these questions during all contacts between these countries and the European Union and by linking MEDA programme allocations more closely to progress in these fields.

In the area of justice and home affairs, the Commission proposes that the partners should agree a general framework leading to a Euro-Mediterranean regional programme on freedom, justice and governance which would cover, in particular, dialogue on legal matters and the fight against organised crime, illegal migration, trafficking in human beings, the management of legal migration and the treatment of migrant communities.

In the area of the social, cultural and human partnership, and in order to reinforce the dialogue between cultures and civilisations, the Commission particularly proposes creating a Euro-Mediterranean Foundation financed by the Member States, the Commission and the Mediterranean partners. In the field of education, the Commission suggests extending the Tempus programme and NETDAYS and eSchola initiatives to the Mediterranean partner countries. The Commission also proposes new initiatives aimed at developing vocational training and enhancing women’s opportunities in economic life (access and participation in the labour market and promotion of their role in business).

As regards the economic and financial partnership, the Commission recommends the continued integration of South-South trade by encouraging free trade between the Mediterranean partners (particularly in the context of the Agadir process encompassing Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt and Jordan) and extending the pan-European system of rules of origin (encompassing the countries of the European Union, the European Free Trade Association and the applicant countries) to the Mediterranean partners. In addition, the Commission recommends defining the priorities for negotiations with the Mediterranean partners to liberalise trade in services.

In addition, the Commission proposes improving reciprocal access to the agricultural markets, developing and interconnecting the transport and energy infrastructures, harmonising policies and regulations with a view to a Euro-Mediterranean internal market and ensuring sustainable development with a high level of environmental protection.

With regard to financial instruments, and in addition to the MEDA programme, the Commission envisages creating a new financial facility or a Euro-Mediterranean bank intended to promote the development of the private sector in the Mediterranean partner countries.

The Commission also suggests promoting the place of civil society within the partnership.

As regards the institutional aspects of the Euro-Mediterranean partnership, the Commission recommends a rapid ratification by the Member States of the Association Agreements with the aim of completing ratification within two years. It also proposes enhancing the role of the Euro-Mediterranean Committee on acquis-related business and reinforcing the dialogue on economic policy at both bilateral and regional levels.

4) Implementing Measures

5) Follow-Up Work

The Fifth Euro-Mediterranean Conference was held on 22 and 23 April 2003 in Valencia. It brought together the foreign ministers of the fifteen Member States of the European Union and of Algeria, the Palestinian Authority, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Malta, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey. Libya and Syria refused to take part. Also present were Mr Solana, High Representative for the CFSP and Secretary-General of the Council, Commissioner Patten, and also, as special guests, representatives from Libya, the Arab League, Mauritania and the Arab Maghreb Union.

The ministers unanimously adopted an Action Plan now referred to as the Valencia Action Plan covering the three political, economic and socio-cultural chapters of the Barcelona process. This plan includes a number of initiatives largely based on the Commission Communication of 13 February 2002.

With regard to the political and security chapter, the action plan aims to reinforce political dialogue and make this more effective by including, for the first time, security and defence issues. In addition, it confirms the mandate of the senior officials on the draft Charter for Peace and Stability allowing them to continue studying this project as soon as the political conditions will allow this. The action plan also recognises the importance of a multilateral approach in the fight against terrorism and proposes a gradual reinforcement of the political aspect by introducing a common strategic language and by developing preventive diplomacy mechanisms.

As regards the economic and financial chapter, the action plan, while recalling the objective of creating a Euro-Mediterranean free trade area by 2010, supports the Agadir process creating a free area between Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt and Jordan. It also welcomes the implementation of the conclusions of the trade ministers’ meeting in Toledo by supporting the creation of a Working Group on Trade Measures relevant for Regional Integration and the participation of the Mediterranean partners in the pan-European system of rules of origin. The action plan also emphasizes the development of free trade in services, the trans-Euro-Mediterranean interconnections and infrastructures (with regard to transport, energy and telecommunications networks) and the prospects of a Euro-Mediterranean internal market underpinned by a harmonisation of policies and regulations. It also stresses the need for a sustainable strategic development framework for the partnership.

As regards financial cooperation, the action plan highlights the improved management of the MEDA programme and welcomes the introduction of a reinforced investment facility within the European Investment Bank (EIB) to promote infrastructure and private sector investment. The plan also notes the fact that, one year after the launch of this facility, the possibility of creating a Euro-Mediterranean bank (majority-owned subsidiary of the EIB), as desired by the Mediterranean partners, will be considered in light of the assessment of this experience.

On the social, cultural and human chapter, the action plan approves the regional work programme on justice and home affairs and the launch of a ministerial conference on migration and social integration of emigrants. It also underlines the particular importance of promoting dialogue between cultures, particularly through the decision in principle to create a Euro-Mediterranean Foundation to promote a dialogue of cultures and the adoption of an action programme in this respect. The action plan also aims to promote employment and training, the role of women in economic life and the more effective participation of civil society in the partnership. The Tempus higher education programme has therefore been extended to the southern Mediterranean partners.

Finally, on the institutional aspect of the partnership, the action plan recommends strengthening the parliamentary dimension of the partnership by creating a Euro-Mediterranean parliamentary assembly. It also recommends examining the possibilities of restructuring the Euromed Committee in order to ensure a greater involvement of partners in the elaboration, monitoring and evaluation of agreed programmes, actions and projects.

Euro-Mediterranean Regional Strategy and Indicative Programme 2007-2013

Euro-Mediterranean Regional Strategy and Indicative Programme 2007-2013

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Euro-Mediterranean Regional Strategy and Indicative Programme 2007-2013

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Euro-Mediterranean Regional Strategy and Indicative Programme 2007-2013

Document or Iniciative

European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI) – Regional Strategy Paper (2007-2013) and Regional Indicative Programme (2007-2013) for the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership .

Summary

The Regional Strategy Paper (RSP) defines the objectives and priorities of the regional cooperation on the basis of the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI) for the period 2007-2013. In this context, it aims to achieve the objectives of the European neighbourhood policy (ENP), which seeks to add a further dimension to the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (Barcelona Processus) to strengthen its impact beyond bilateral relations.

The political, economic, social and environment situation of the Mediterranean region poses a certain number of challenges for the region. Regional cooperation offers a response to the challenges of common, and in particular cross-border, interest for the countries of the region. The RSP in this way complements the country strategy papers (CSP) drawn up for Algeria, the Palestinian Authority, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Syria and Tunisia.

EU response strategy

The European Union (EU) seeks to maintain and step up the reform process in the Mediterranean partner countries. It also seeks to promote dialogue, strengthening the domestic political institutions by means of the collaboration offered by various instruments.

In this capacity, the RIP identifies the priority areas which represent value-added through the comparative advantage they may bring to strengthen the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership.

The justice, security and migration cooperation is of regional interest, with activities comprising:

  • confidence-building measures for a first component aimed at promoting cooperation in the field of civil protection and a second component on partnership for peace. In more concrete terms, the RIP proposes, for example, support for crisis management and the implementation of a Code of Conduct on Countering Terrorism;
  • a “justice, police and migration” component to consolidate the results obtained during previous programmes and to enhance cooperation on managing migration flows between countries of origin, transit and destination. More specifically, this component encourages contacts, training and assistance among law enforcement officers;
  • a “policy analysis” component, with the objective of developing the Euro-Mediterranean network of foreign policy institutes and the Economic Research Institute.

Sustainable economic development is a priority for the achievement of the Euro-Mediterranean Free Trade Area by 2010. This priority consists of:

  • promotion of reforms and investments to attract investors;
  • cooperation in respect of infrastructure networks in the transport and energy sectors;
  • the completion of an area of free trade and South-South regional economic integration by ensuring the environmental sustainability of the region;
  • an environmental programme covering marine pollution, among other issues.

Social development and cultural exchanges focus on people-to-people exchanges and raising awareness of the Partnership through the media. Their main components are:

  • gender equality and civil society, with a view to encouraging active citizenship, strengthening equality between men and women and encouraging recognition of the role of women;
  • information and communication to promote the Partnership and the ENP and improve cooperation between the EU and the various media in the region;
  • Euromed Youth to encourage dialogue between young people on opposite sides of the Mediterranean, the integration of young people and active citizenship;
  • dialogue between cultures and cultural heritage.

The Partnership with the neighbouring countries in this way allows progress towards a significant degree of integration with the EU, enhanced trading relations and intensified cooperation in matters of security. Nevertheless, the acceptance and will of the partner countries are essential to ensure the effectiveness of the Partnership.

Terms and conditions

The indicative budget for the period 2007-2010 amounts to EUR 343.3 million.

The RIP for the period 2007-2013 presents the programmes for each priority. To this end, it defines performance indicators to measure the impact and the expected outcomes, such as:

  • rebuilding of confidence within each society and between societies by strengthening civil society and transnational links;
  • consolidation of the Euromed networks and police and judicial cooperation;
  • support for the social integration of migrant workers and their families;
  • increase in the number of investment projects and new job creation thanks to a regional investment promotion programme;
  • more integrated energy markets, secure energy supplies and developed interconnections and renewable energy sources;
  • greater public awareness of the need for environmental protection.

Background

In accordance with its foreign policy objectives, the EU promotes prosperity, solidarity, security and sustainable development in the world, as well as democracy and human rights. The ENP, initiated in 2003, pursues these objectives by promoting good neighbourhood relations. To achieve this, the ENPI, the financial instrument of the ENP for 2007-2013, supports the partner countries of the ENP by integrating the regional and cross-border dimension. It also pursues the objectives identified by the MEDA programme 2002-2006, drawing on the experience gained from it.

Related Act

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 4 December 2006 on strengthening the European neighbourhood policy [COM(2006) 726 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip

Financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip

This Regulation establishes the conditions and areas of financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip with a view to contributing to economic, political and social development in the region. It will be replaced by the European Neighbourhood instrument when this comes into force.

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1734/94 of 11 July 1994 on financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and Gaza Strip [see amending acts].

Summary

1. Originally titled “On financial and technical cooperation with the Occupied Territories”, the Regulation sets up financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

2. The financial and technical cooperation is intended to contribute to sustainable economic, political and social development in the region, with multi-annual programmes where possible.

3. Projects and operations under the Regulation cover infrastructure, production, urban and rural development, education, health, the environment, services, foreign trade, job creation, institution building, promotion of democracy and human rights and development of civil society. These activities are financed by grants and 3% interest rate subsidies.

4. Apart from the States and regions involved, other local, regional, private and non-Governmental bodies may also benefit from the support measures. Participation in invitations to tender and contracts is open on equal terms to all natural and legal persons in the Member States and in the Mediterranean partner States.

5. The aid may be combined with European Investment Bank (EIB) financing from own resources and may be used for co-financing with Member States, non-member countries in the region, multilateral bodies or the West Bank and Gaza Strip themselves.

6. The Commission is assisted by the MED Committee set up under Regulation (EC) No 1488/96 for financing decisions on the following matters:

  • projects and operations under the Regulation for amounts of over EUR 2 million other than those relating to interest rate subsidies on EIB loans;
  • financing decisions on overall allocations for technical cooperation, training and trade promotion.

7. Within an overall allocation, the Commission adopts financing decisions not exceeding EUR 2 000 000. It also adopts decisions amending financing decisions where they do not entail any substantial amendments or additional commitments in excess of 20 % of the original commitment. The financing decisions are subject to supervision and financial control by the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF), including on-the-spot audits and checks, and audits by the Court of Auditors.

References

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1734/94 19.7.1994 OJ L 182, 16.7.1994
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 2824/98 1.1.1999 OJ L 351 of 29.12.1998
Regulation (EC) No 2840/98 2.1.1999 OJ L 354 of 30.12.1998
Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 20.11.2003 OJ L 284 of 30.10.2003
Regulation (EC) No 669/2004 17.4.2004 OJ L 105 of 14.4.2004
Regulation (EC) No 2110/2005 28.12.2005 OJ L 344 of 27.12.2005

Related Acts

Regulation (EC) No 1638/2006 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 2006 laying down general provisions establishing a European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument [Official Journal L 310 of 9.11.2006]

This Regulation repeals Regulation (EC) No 1734/94.

Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 29 September 2003 adapting to Council Decision 1999/468/EC the provisions relating to committees which assist the Commission in the exercise of its implementing powers laid down in instruments subject to the procedure referred to in Article 251 of the EC Treaty [Official Journal L 284 of 31.10.2003].

Mediterranean partner countries

Mediterranean partner countries

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Mediterranean partner countries

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Mediterranean partner countries

Mediterranean partner countries

GENERAL FRAMEWORK

Framework for relations

  • Partnership for democracy and prosperity with the Southern Mediterranean
  • Barcelona Process: Union for the Mediterranean
  • Euro-Mediterranean Association Agreements
  • Pan-Euro-Mediterranean system of cumulation of origin

Barcelona Process: Euro-Mediterranean Partnership

  • Tenth anniversary of the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership
  • The Valencia Ministerial Conference and its Action Plan
  • Reinvigorating the Barcelona process
  • Barcelona Declaration and Euro-Mediterranean partnership
  • EU Common Strategy for the Mediterranean

European Neighbourhood Policy

  • New neighbourhood policy strategy
  • Taking stock of the European Neighbourhood Policy
  • Neighbourhood policy: participation in European Union Agencies and programmes
  • Neighbourhood Policy – Strategy paper
  • Neighbourhood Policy: 2008 Report
  • Implementation of the European Neighbourhood Policy in 2007
  • European Neighbourhood Policy: recommendations for Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia and for Egypt and Lebanon

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

  • European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (2007 – 2013)
  • Euro-Mediterranean Regional Strategy and Indicative Programme 2007-2013
  • Inter-regional programme: Strategy paper 2007-2013 and indicative programme 2007-2010
  • Cross-border cooperation (CBC) 2007-2013
  • Common framework for joint multiannual programming
  • MEDA programme
  • Financial and technical cooperation with the West Bank and the Gaza Strip

SECTORAL COOPERATION

  • Human rights and relations in the Mediterranean
  • Environment strategy for the Mediterranean
  • Euro-African Partnership for infrastructure
  • Cooperation with Non-EU Member Countries on nuclear safety
  • European Training Foundation (ETF)
  • Combating HIV/AIDS in the European Union and neighbouring countries (2009-2013)
  • Action on HIV/AIDS in the European Union and neighbouring countries 2006 – 2009