Category Archives: Water protection and management

Some 70% of the Earth’s surface is covered by seas and oceans, and these produce almost three quarters of the oxygen we breathe. We can use directly only 1% of this water, however, and many forms of human activity put water resources under considerable pressure. Polluted water, whatever the source of the pollution, flows one way or another back into our natural surroundings – into the sea or water tables – from where it can have a harmful effect on human health and the environment. One of the most important pieces of legislation in this area is the Water Framework Directive.

Water Protection and Management

Water protection and management

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Water protection and management

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Water protection and management

Some 70% of the Earth’s surface is covered by seas and oceans, and these produce almost three quarters of the oxygen we breathe. We can use directly only 1% of this water, however, and many forms of human activity put water resources under considerable pressure. Polluted water, whatever the source of the pollution, flows one way or another back into our natural surroundings – into the sea or water tables – from where it can have a harmful effect on human health and the environment. One of the most important pieces of legislation in this area is the Water Framework Directive.

GENERAL FRAMEWORK

  • Water protection and management (Water Framework Directive)
  • Pricing and long-term management of water
  • Flood management and evaluation
  • Droughts and water scarcity
  • Urban waste water treatment

SPECIFIC USES OF WATER

  • Quality of drinking water
  • Bathing water quality (until 2014)
  • Bathing water quality
  • Water suitable for fish-breeding
  • Quality of shellfish waters

MARINE POLLUTION

  • Strategy for the marine environment
  • Maritime safety: compensation fund for oil pollution damage
  • Maritime safety: prevention of pollution from ships
  • Ship-source pollution and criminal penalties
  • Maritime safety: prohibition of organotin compounds on ships
  • Maritime safety: Bunkers Convention

REGIONAL WATERS

  • European Union Strategy for Danube Region
  • Baltic Sea Strategy
  • Environment strategy for the Mediterranean
  • Strategy to improve maritime governance in the Mediterranean
  • Black Sea Synergy
  • Danube – Black Sea region

Regional convention

  • Barcelona Convention for the protection of the Mediterranean
  • Helsinki Convention on the protection of the Baltic Sea
  • Helsinki Convention: trans-boundary watercourses and international lakes
  • Convention for the Protection of the Rhine
  • OSPAR Convention

DISCHARGES OF SUBSTANCES

  • Industrial emissions
  • Integrated pollution prevention and control (until 2013)
  • Environmental quality standards applicable to surface water
  • Protection of groundwater against pollution
  • Detergents
  • Stockholm Convention on persistent organic pollutants (POPs)
  • Agricultural nitrates
  • Community strategy concerning mercury
  • Protection of the aquatic environment against discharges of dangerous substances (until 2013)
  • Other substances: protection of groundwater

 


 

Another Normative about Water protection and management

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Agriculture > Environment

Water protection and management (Water Framework Directive)

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2000 establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy [See amending acts].

Summary

The European Union (EC) has established a framework for the protection of:

  • inland surface waters *;
  • groundwater *;
  • transitional waters *; and
  • and coastal waters *.

This Framework-Directive has a number of objectives, such as preventing and reducing pollution, promoting sustainable water usage, environmental protection, improving aquatic ecosystems and mitigating the effects of floods and droughts.

Its ultimate objective is to achieve “good ecological and chemical status” for all Community waters by 2015.

Administrative arrangements

Member States have to identify all the river basins * lying within their national territory and to assign them to individual river basin districts *. River basins covering the territory of more than one Member State will be assigned to an international river basin district.

Member States are to designate a competent authority for the application of the rules provided for in this Framework-Directive within each river basin district.

Identification and analysis of waters

By 2004 at the latest, each Member State shall produce:

  • an analysis of the characteristics of each river basin district;
  • a review of the impact of human activity on water;
  • an economic analysis of water use;
  • a register of areas requiring special protection;
  • a survey of all bodies of water used for abstracting water for human consumption and producing more than 10 m³ per day or serving more than 50 persons.

This analysis must be revised in 2013 and every six years thereafter.

Management plans and programmes of measures

In 2009, nine years after the Framework-Directive entered into force, management plans were produced for each river basin district, taking account of the results of the analyses and studies carried out. These plans cover the period 2009-2015. They shall be revised in 2015 and then every six years thereafter.

The management plans must be implemented in 2012. They aim to:

  • prevent deterioration, enhance and restore bodies of surface water, achieve good chemical and ecological status of such water by 2015 at the latest and to reduce pollution from discharges and emissions of hazardous substances;
  • protect, enhance and restore the status of all bodies of groundwater, prevent the pollution and deterioration of groundwater, and ensure a balance between groundwater abstraction and replenishment;
  • preserve protected areas.

The management plans for river basin districts can be complemented by more detailed management programmes and plans for a sub-basin, a sector or a particular type of water.

Temporary deterioration of bodies of water is not in breach of the requirements of this Framework-Directive if it is the result of circumstances which are exceptional or could not reasonably have been foreseen and which are due to an accident, natural causes or force majeure.

Member States shall encourage participation by all stakeholders in the implementation of this Framework-Directive, specifically with regard to the management plans for river basin districts. Projects from the management plans must be submitted to public consultation for at least 6 months.

From 2010, Member States must ensure that water pricing policies provide adequate incentives for users to use water resources efficiently and that the various economic sectors contribute to the recovery of the costs of water services, including those relating to the environment and resources.

Member States must introduce arrangements to ensure that effective, proportionate and dissuasive penalties are imposed in the event of breaches of the provisions of this Framework Directive.

A list of priority substances selected from among the ones which present a significant risk to the aquatic environment has been drawn up at European level. This list is set out in Annex X to this Framework-Directive.

Key terms used in the act
  • Inland waters: all standing or flowing water on the surface of the land, and all groundwater on the landward side of the baseline from which the breadth of territorial waters is measured.
  • Surface water: inland waters, except groundwater, transitional waters and coastal waters, except in respect of chemical status, for which territorial waters are also included.
  • Groundwater: all water which is below the surface of the ground in the saturation zone and in direct contact with the ground or subsoil.
  • Transitional waters: bodies of surface water in the vicinity of river mouths which are partly saline in character as a result of their proximity to coastal waters but which are substantially influenced by freshwater flows.
  • Coastal water: surface water on the landward side of a line every point of which is at a distance of one nautical mile on the seaward side from the nearest point of the baseline from which the breadth of territorial waters is measured, extending where appropriate up to the outer limit of transitional waters.
  • River basin: the area of land from which all surface run-off flows through a sequence of streams, rivers and, possibly, lakes into the sea at a single river mouth, estuary or delta.
  • River basin district: the area of land and sea, made up of one or more neighbouring river basins together with their associated groundwaters and coastal waters, which is identified under Article 3(1) as the main unit for management of river basins.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2000/60/EC

22.12.2000

22.12.2003

OJ L 327 of 22.12.2000

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Decision 2455/2001/EC

16.12.2001

OJ L 331 of 15.12.2001

Directive 2008/32/EC

21.3.2008

OJ L 81 of 20.3.2008

Directive 2009/31/EC

25.6.2009

OJ L 140 of 5.6.2009

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 2000/60/EC have been incorporated in the original text. This consolidated versionis of documentary value only.

AMENDMENT OF ANNEXES

Annex X – List of priority substances in the field of water policy

Directive 2008/105/EC [Official Journal L 348 of 24.12.2008].

Related Acts

Communication from the Commission of 22 March 2007 – Towards sustainable water management in the European Union – First stage in the implementation of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC [COM(2007) 128 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

In this report the Commission sets out the results provided by the Member States concerning the application of the Water Framework Directive. Among other things, it mentions that there is a considerable risk that several Member States will fail to meet the targets set in the Framework Directive, in particular because of the physical deterioration of aquatic ecosystems, especially as a result of overexploitation of water resources and disturbing levels of pollution from diffuse sources. The Commission also indicates that there have been problems with meeting the deadline for incorporating the Framework Directive into national law and shortcomings in the actual transposition process in some cases. However, the establishment of river basin districts and the designation of the competent national authorities seem to be well under way, although progress does still need to be made with regard to international cooperation in some instances. The Commission also indicates that there are considerable differences in the quality of the environmental and economic assessments made in respect of river basins as well as shortcomings in the economic analyses carried out. The Commission finishes by making a number of recommendations to the Member States with a view to making good the shortcomings reported, integrating sustainable management of water into other national policies and making the most of public participation, and gives advance notice of what it plans to do in future in the context of European water management policy.

Report from the Commission of 1 April 2009 published in accordance with article 18.3 of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC on programmes for monitoring of water status [COM(2009) 156 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Water Protection and Management in other Legal Encyclopedias

Klamath Basin Water Supply Enhancement Act of 2000 – American Legal Encyclopedia

Coastal Zone Management Act Of 1972 in the American Legal Encyclopedia

Bathing water quality

Bathing water quality

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Bathing water quality

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Bathing water quality

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2006/7/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 February 2006 concerning the management of bathing water quality and repealing Directive 76/160/EEC.

SUMMARY

The European Union (EU) is committed to protecting environmental quality and human health. This Directive therefore strengthens the rules guaranteeing bathing water quality *. It supplements Directive 2000/60/EC on water protection and management.

The Directive does not apply to swimming pools or spa pools, or to artificially created confined waters, subject to treatment or used for therapeutic purposes.

Monitoring of bathing water

Each year, the Member States shall identify the bathing waters in their territory and define the length of the bathing season.

They shall establish monitoring at the location most used by bathers or where the risk of pollution is greatest. Monitoring shall take place by means of sampling:

  • four samples, including one before the start of the bathing season;
  • three samples only if the seasons does not exceed eight weeks or if the region is subject to special geographical constraints.

Member States shall communicate the results of their monitoring to the Commission with a description of the water quality management measures. Monitoring may be suspended exceptionally once the Commission has been informed.

Determining bathing water quality

Water quality is assessed on the basis of microbiological data defined according to the parameters described in Annex I. Member States shall then establish a classification of waters of poor, sufficient, good or excellent quality. This classification shall comply with the criteria set out in Annex II.

All bathing waters in the EU must be at least of sufficient quality by the end of the 2015 bathing season. Furthermore, Member States are to take the necessary measures to improve the number of bathing waters of good or excellent quality.

If quality is poor, Member States shall adopt the necessary measures to manage and eliminate pollution, and to protect and inform bathers.

Bathing water profile

The Directive provides for profiles to be established to identify possible pollution, for one or more than one contiguous bathing waters. In particular, they comprise an assessment of:

  • the physical, geographical and hydrological characteristics of the bathing water and of other surface waters in the catchment area;
  • pollution and sources thereof;
  • management measures.

These profiles must be established by 24 March 2011.

Exceptional measures

Member States shall adopt exceptional measures if unexpected situations deteriorate the quality of waters or represent a risk to bathers’ health.

Appropriate monitoring must also be implemented if there is a risk of proliferation of algae. The authorities responsible must therefore:

  • take management measures and provide information immediately if a proliferation of cyanobacteria (or “blue algae”) occurs;
  • assess the health risks if there is a proliferation of macro-algae and/or marine phytoplankton.

Transboundary waters

Member States shall exchange information and take joint action if a river basin * extends over several territories.

Information to the public

National authorities shall enable the public to obtain information and to participate in water quality management. Citizens may therefore make suggestions, remarks or complaints. They may also participate in the establishment, review and updating of lists of water quality.

Moreover, Member States shall ensure that adequate information is disseminated actively and is easily available during the bathing season. This concerns in particular:

  • the classification of water, prohibitions or advice against bathing;
  • a general description of the water in non-technical language;
  • a description of the nature and duration of pollution.

Context

This Directive shall repeal Directive 76/2006/EEC by 31 December 2014.

Key terms
  • Bathing water: any element of surface water where the national authorities of a Member State expect a large number of people to bathe or have not imposed a permanent bathing prohibition, or issued permanent advice against bathing.
  • River basin: area from which all surface run-off flows through a sequence of streams, rivers and, possibly, lakes into the sea at a single river mouth, estuary or delta.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 2006/7/EC

24.3.2006

24.3.2008

OJ L 64 of 4.3.2006


Another Normative about Bathing water quality

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Environment > Water protection and management

Bathing water quality (until 2014)

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 76/160/EEC of 8 December 1975 concerning the quality of bathing water [See amending acts].

Summary

This Directive concerns the quality of bathing water in the Member States of the European Union (EU). It concerns those waters in which bathing is authorised by the national authorities and regularly practised by a significant number of bathers. This Directive does not apply to water intended for therapeutic purposes, or to water used in swimming pools.

It lays down the minimum quality criteria to be met by bathing water. They relate to:

  • the limit values of substances considered to be indicators of pollution (in the Annex);
  • the minimum sampling frequency and method of analysis or inspection of such water (in the Annex).

Member States may fix more stringent values than the criteria laid down in the Directive. In addition, where it does not give any values for certain substances, Member States are not obliged to fix any.

Water quality assessment

Sampling is carried out by Member States at different intervals for each polluting substance (in the Annex). Samples are taken at places where the daily average density of bathers is highest. Sampling begins two weeks before the start of the bathing season. The water testing must be adapted to the geographical and topographical conditions and to the presence of existing or potential polluting discharges.

Non-compliance

Where the waters do not conform to the parameters of the Directive, Member States may not authorise bathing in them before they have taken the necessary measures to improve the water quality. They have a period of ten years after notification of the Directive for the quality of the water to conform to the set limit values.

However, under certain conditions, bathing water is deemed to conform to the relevant parameters, even if a certain percentage of samples taken during the bathing season do not conform to the limit values. Derogations to the Directive are possible, provided that they meet the objective of protecting public health.

In addition, the consequences of floods, natural disasters or abnormal weather conditions are not taken into consideration when determining the water quality.

Monitoring Committee

A Committee on adaptation to technical progress enables the measures for improving water quality to be adapted. It consists of representatives from the Member States and is chaired by a representative of the Commission.

Context

This is repealed by Directive 2006/7/EC with effect from 31 December 2014. However, it still applies in Member States where transposition of the new Directive is not finished.

The review of bathing water legislation is designed to ensure consistency with the Sixth Environment Action Programme, the Sustainable Development Strategy and the Water Framework Directive. It is also intended to simplify procedures in the light of scientific developments and improve participatory processes for the actors concerned and the information given to the public.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 76/160/EEC

10.12.1975

10.12.1977

OJ L 31, 5.2.1976

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 91/692/EEC

23.12.1991

1.1.1993

OJ L 377, 31.12.1991

Regulation (EC) No 1137/2008

11.12.2008

OJ L 311, 21.11.2008

Successive amendments and corrections to Directive 76/160/EEC have been incorporated in the basic text. This consolidated versionis for reference purpose only.

Related Acts

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council of 21 December 2000: Developing a new bathing water policy [COM(2000) 860 final – Not published in Official Journal].
The Communication sets out the strengths and weaknesses of the management of bathing water quality, and proposes various approaches to drafting a new directive to take account of technical progress in the field.

Commission Decision 92/446/EEC of 27 July 1992 concerning questionnaires relating to Directives in the water sector [Official Journal L 247 of 27.8.1992].
This Decision draws up the outlines of questionnaires needed to monitor the implementation of and compliance with the provisions of all Directives in the water sector, including Directive 76/160/EEC.

Urban waste water treatment

Urban waste water treatment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Urban waste water treatment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Urban waste water treatment

Council Directive 91/271/EEC of 21 May 1991 concerning urban waste water treatment [See amending acts].

Summary

Directive 91/271/EEC

This Directive concerns the collection, treatment and discharge of urban waste water and the treatment and discharge of waste water from certain industrial sectors. Its aim is to protect the environment from any adverse effects caused by the discharge of such waters.

Industrial waste water entering collecting systems and the disposal of waste water and sludge from urban waste water treatment plants are subject to regulations and/or specific authorisation by the competent authorities.

The Directive establishes a timetable, which Member States must adhere to, for the provision of collection and treatment systems for urban waste water in agglomerations corresponding to the categories laid down in the Directive. The main deadlines are as follows:

  • 31 December 1998: all agglomerations of more than 10 000 “population equivalent”* (p.e.) which discharge their effluent into sensitive areas must have a proper collection and treatment system;
  • 31 December 2000: all agglomerations of more than 15 000 p.e. which do not discharge their effluent into a sensitive area must have a collection and treatment system which enables them to satisfy the requirements in Table 1 of Annex I;
  • 31 December 2005: all agglomerations of between 2 000 and 10 000 p.e. which discharge their effluent into sensitive areas, and all agglomerations of between 2 000 and 15 000 p.e. which do not discharge into such areas must have a collection and treatment system.

Annex II requires Member States to draw up lists of sensitive and less sensitive areas which receive the treated waters. These lists must be updated regularly.

The treatment of urban water is to be varied according to the sensitivity of the receiving waters.

The Directive lays down specific requirements for discharges from certain industrial sectors of biodegradable industrial waste water not entering urban waste water treatment plants before discharge to receiving waters.

Member States are responsible for monitoring both discharges from treatment plants and the receiving waters. They must ensure that the competent national authorities publish a situation report every two years. This report must also be sent to the Commission.

Member States must set up national programmes for the implementation of this Directive and must present them to the Commission.

The Directive also provides for temporary derogations.

Directive 98/15/EC

This Directive clarifies the rules relating to discharges from urban waste water treatment plants in order to put an end to differences in interpretation by the Member States.

It specifies, among other things, that:

  • the option of using daily averages for the total nitrogen concentration applies both to agglomerations of 10 000-100 000 p.e. and to those of more than 100 000 p.e.;
  • the condition concerning the temperature of the effluent in the biological reactor and the limitation on the time of operation to take account of regional climatic conditions only apply to the “alternative” method using daily averages;
  • use of the “alternative” method must ensure the same level of environmental protection as the annual mean technique.

Key terms used in the act

  • urban waste water means waste water from residential settlements and services which originates predominantly from the human metabolism and from household activities (domestic waste water) or a mixture of domestic waste water with waste water which is discharged from premises used for carrying on any trade or industry (industrial waste water) and/or run-off rain water;
  • eutrophication means the enrichment of water by nutrients, especially compounds of nitrogen and/or phosphorus, causing an accelerated growth of algae and higher forms of plant life to produce an undesirable disturbance to the balance of organisms present in the water and to the quality of the water concerned;
  • population equivalent is a measure of pollution representing the average organic biodegradable load per person per day: it is defined in Directive 91/271/EEC as the organic biodegradable load having a five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) of 60 g of oxygen per day.

References

Act

Entry into force

Deadline for transposition in the Member States

Official Journal

Directive 91/271/EEC

19.06.1991

30.06.1993

OJ L 135 of 30.05.1991

Amending act(s)

Entry into force

Deadline for transposition in the Member States

Official Journal

Directive 98/15/EC

27.03.1998

30.09.1998

OJ L 67 of 07.03.1998

Related Acts

Communication from the Commission of 22 March 2007 entitled: “Towards sustainable water management in the European Union – First stage in the implementation of the Water Framework Directive 2000/60/EC” [COM(2007) 128 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
In this report the Commission notes that in 2003 significant amounts of waste water were still not being treated adequately before being discharged into the surface waters of the Member States. The main problems singled out are the lack of appropriate treatment and the lack of designation of “sensitive areas”. In 2003, 17 cities with populations of over 150 000 did not have treatment systems. Significant financial investment is still needed in order for Member States to comply fully with the Directive.

Report from the Commission of 23 April 2004 on the implementation of Council Directive 91/271/EEC of 21 May 1991 concerning urban waste water treatment, as amended by Commission Directive 98/15/EC of 27 February 1998 [COM(2004) 248 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
This report looks at the application of the Directive at 31 December 2000. The Commission notes that, since the previous report, considerable efforts have been undertaken by Member States and improvements in the waste water treatment sector have been achieved in many countries. Significant improvements have been achieved in terms of the identification of sensitive areas and waste water infrastructure in those areas, but the Commission considers that less than 50% of the waste water load impacting on sensitive areas is receiving the appropriate level of treatment. Meanwhile, the number of cities with populations of over 150 000 without proper waste water treatment has fallen from 37 in 1998 to 25. Despite improvements having taken place, however, the Commission is concerned about the considerable delays in implementing the Directive and stresses that implementation will be a particular challenge for the new Member States.

Report from the Commission of 21 November 2001 on the implementation of Council Directive 91/271/EEC of 21 May 1991 concerning urban waste water treatment, as amended by Commission Directive 98/15/EC of 27 February 1998 [COM(2001) 685 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
This report looks at the application of the Directive at 31 December 1998. On that date, a total of 37 European cities with a population of more than 150 000 were discharging their waste water untreated into the natural environment. Another 57 were also discharging a large proportion of their effluent either untreated or without proper treatment.

Report from the Commission of 15 January 1999 on the implementation of Council Directive 91/271/EEC of 21 May 1991 concerning urban waste water treatment, as amended by Commission Directive 98/15/EC of 27 February 1998 [COM(98) 775 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Danube – Black Sea region

Danube – Black Sea region

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Danube – Black Sea region

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Danube – Black Sea region

Highlight actions to be taken to improve environmental quality in the Danube – Black Sea region and the outline of a strategy aimed at protecting the environment of the region.

2) Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission: Environmental cooperation in the Danube – Black Sea region [COM (2001) 615 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

3) Summary

The Danube and the Black Sea constitute the largest non-oceanic body of water in Europe. With enlargement, many of the Danube countries became members of the European Union (EU) and the Black Sea became a coastal area of the EU. As the environmental situation in the region is extremely critical, a strategy is required to rectify it. If this strategy is to be effective, there has to be cooperation between all the countries of the region.

Cooperation before the communication

The Convention on cooperation and protection and sustainable use of the Danube River and the Convention on the protection of the Black Sea against pollution are the current instruments for environmental cooperation. The communication considers that they should be reinforced and that they should form the basis for environmental cooperation in the region.

The European Community is a party to the Danube Convention and the Commission has observer status regarding the Convention on the Black Sea. The Community’s PHARE and TACIS programmes also support environmental projects in the region. Annex 2.3 to the communication lists EU environmental projects carried out in the region.

Main environmental problems in the region

Eutrophication (over-enrichment of the water with organic matter, especially algae, produced by excessive discharges of nutrients) is one of the main environmental problems in both the Danube and the Black Sea. This phenomenon has adverse effects on the biodiversity of the water, wetlands, the surrounding forests, human health and fisheries. Much of the nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) discharged into the water come from agriculture.

Competition for water in the Danube is also a problem, as is over exploitation of surface and groundwater, contamination with hazardous substances and accidental pollution and degradation and loss of wetlands.

Discharge of waste water, oil pollution in the coastal areas and loss of biodiversity including fish stocks are the most serious problems in the Black Sea.

Environmental objectives

The Commission states that the long-term goal is to reduce the levels of nutrients and other hazardous substances in the water in order to allow the ecosystems to recover. The intermediate goal is to implement measures to avoid discharges of nitrogen and phosphorus to the Black Sea (including via the Danube) exceeding 1997 levels.

Other important objectives are mentioned in the communication: protecting and enhancing the status of ecosystems, promoting sustainable water use, reducing pollution of groundwater and mitigating the effects of floods and droughts. The importance of applying the principles of integrated coastal zone management is also underlined.

Actions to achieve the environmental objectives

There are three type of action envisaged in the communication:

  • establishment of an operational framework for the entire region: the Commission stresses the urgent need to assist the two existing Conventions on environmental matters and to promote regional cooperation. The communication provides for the establishment of a Task Force and a joint Danube – Black Sea working group. Following this communication, the DABLAS Task Force was set up in November 2001;
  • improved integration of Danube – Black Sea priorities into EU sectoral policies: the Commission will assist in the implementation of the guiding principles of the EC Water Framework Directive and in the conclusion of cooperation agreements for other rivers flowing into the Black Sea. It will promote research in the sector and the ratification of other environmental conventions by the countries of the region and will examine closely the environmental efforts made by Romania;
  • more efficient financial assistance: the Commission will take account of environmental matters in all projects financed by the EU in the area and will attempt to encourage the financial institutions to increase investments. It will study the possibility of the countries of the region one day participating in the LIFE programme.

4) Implementing Measures

5) Follow-Up Work

 

Protection of the aquatic environment against discharges of dangerous substances

Protection of the aquatic environment against discharges of dangerous substances

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Protection of the aquatic environment against discharges of dangerous substances

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Protection of the aquatic environment against discharges of dangerous substances (until 2013)

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2006/11/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 February 2006 on pollution caused by certain dangerous substances discharged into the aquatic environment of the Community (Codified version).

Summary

This Directive lays down rules for protection against, and prevention of, pollution resulting from the discharge of certain substances into the aquatic environment. It applies to inland surface water, territorial waters and internal coastal waters.

Two lists of dangerous substances have been compiled to combat pollution:

  • discharge of substances in list I must be eliminated; while
  • discharge of substances in list II must be reduced.

Pursuant to Annex IX of the Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC), quality objectives and emission limit values are established by the “daughter directives” of Directive 2006/11/EC. Moreover, emission limit values for pollutants must be based on the best available techniques in line with Article 10 of Framework Directive 2000/60/EC.

All discharges of substances included in list I require prior authorisation by the competent authority in the Member State concerned. The authorisation is granted for a limited period and lays down emission standards which may be more stringent than the thresholds set by Community legislation, particularly to take account of the toxicity or persistence of the substance in the environment into which it is discharged. It is up to the Member States to ensure compliance with the emission standards.

For the substances on list II, the Member States adopt and implement programmes to preserve and improve water quality. All discharges are subject to prior authorisation by the competent authority in the Member State concerned that lays down the emission standards.

The Member States draw up an inventory of the discharges into the waters covered by this Directive and may take more severe measures than those laid down by Community legislation to reduce or eliminate pollution caused by dangerous substances.

The Directive lays down a procedure for revising and adding to the lists or transferring specific substances from list II to list I.

Before 22 December 2012, Member States may carry out surveillance and notification pursuant to Articles 5, 8 and 15 of the Water Framework Directive.

Background

This Directive codifies and replaces Directive 76/464/EEC and its subsequent amendments. This codification leads to the clarification and rationalisation of legislation. It takes into account the adoption of the water framework Directive and the international conventions on the protection of water courses and the marine environment.

The Directive is repealed by the Water Framework Directive as from 22 December 2013.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2006/11/EC

24.4.2006

OJ L 64 of 4.4.2006

Related Acts

Environmental quality standards

Council Directive 82/176/EEC [Official Journal L 81 of 27.3.1982].

This Directive sets limit values and quality objectives for mercury discharges by the chlor-alkali electrolysis industry].
See consolidated version .

Council Directive 83/513/EEC [Official Journal L 291 of 24.10.1983]
This Directive sets limit values and quality objectives for cadmium discharges in the aquatic environment.
See consolidated version .

Council Directive 84/156/EEC [Official Journal L 74 of 17.3.1984]

This Directive sets limit values and quality objectives for mercury discharges in sectors other than the chlor-alkali electrolysis industry.
See consolidated version .

Council Directive [Official Journal L 274 of 17.10.1984].
This Directive sets limit values and quality objectives for discharges of hexachlorocyclohexane in the aquatic environment.

See consolidated version .

Council Directive 86/280/EEC [Official Journal L 181 of 4.7.1986]. This Directive sets limit values and quality objectives for discharges of certain dangerous substances included in List I of the Annex to Directive 2006/11/EC.

See consolidated version .

Directive 2008/105/CE of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 December 2008 on environmental quality standards in the field of water, amending and repealing Council Directives 82/176/EEC, 83/513/EEC, 84/156/EEC, 84/491/EEC, 86/280/EEC and amending Directive [Official Journal L 348 of 24.12.2008].
This Directive establishes environmental quality standards (EQS) in the field of water. These quality standards aim to combat surface water pollution by 33 priority chemical substances (Annex II). This Directive provides in particular for:

  • an amendment of the list of priority substances and the corresponding EQS;
  • transparent criteria to designate so-called “mixing” zones, within which standards may be exceeded under certain conditions;
  • the preparation of an inventory of emissions, discharges and losses. This inventory will be used to prepare the Commission Report which will check progress achieved in reducing or ceasing emissions of pollutant substances by 2018.

The Directive supplements the legislative framework introduced by the Water Framework Directive. It allows decisions to be made at all levels of governance. Member States have until December 2009 to prepare plans for the management of hydrographical districts and programmes of measures relating thereto.

Improvement of information

Directive 91/692/EEC [Official Journal L 377 of 31.12.1991].

This Directive aims at rationalizing and improving on a sectoral basis the provisions on the transmission of information and the publication of reports concerning certain Community Directives on the protection of the environment.

Decision 92/446/EEC [Official Journal L 247 of 27.8.1992].

This Decision draws up the outlines of questionnaires needed to monitor the implementation of and compliance with the provisions of all Directives in the water sector, including Directives 76/464/EEC, 82/176/EEC, 83/513/EEC, 84/156/EEC, 84/491/EEC and 86/280/EEC.

Transfer Register

Regulation (EC) No 166/2006 [Official Journal OJ L 33 of 4.2.2006].
The EU introduces a European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register to improve access by the public to information and, in the long term, contribute to preventing and reducing pollution.

Other substances: protection of groundwater

Other substances: protection of groundwater

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Other substances: protection of groundwater

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Other substances: protection of groundwater

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 80/68/EEC of 17 December 1979 on the protection of groundwater against pollution caused by certain dangerous substances [See amending acts].

Summary

The purpose of this Directive is to prevent the discharge of certain toxic, persistent and bioaccumulable substances into groundwater.

The following are not covered:

  • discharges of domestic effluents from isolated dwellings;
  • discharges containing substances listed in Directive 80/68/EEC in very small quantities and concentrations;
  • discharges of matter containing radioactive substances.

There are two lists of dangerous substances drawn up for the protection of groundwater:

  • direct discharge of substances in List I is prohibited. This list includes organohalogen, organophosphorus and organotin compounds, mercury and cadmium and their compounds, and hydrocarbons and cyanides;
  • discharge of substances in List II must be limited. This list includes certain metals such as copper, zinc, lead and arsenic, and other substances such as fluorides, toxic or persistent organic compounds of silicon, and biocides and their derivatives not appearing in List I.

All indirect discharges of substances in List I and all direct or indirect discharges of substances in List II are subject to prior authorisation. Such authorisation:

  • is granted after an investigation into the receiving environment;
  • is granted for a limited period and subject to regular review;
  • lays down the conditions that have to be met for discharges. If they have not been or cannot be met, the authorisation is withdrawn or refused.

Monitoring of compliance with these conditions and of the effects of discharges on groundwater is the responsibility of the competent authorities of the Member States.

The Directive provides for exceptions, under certain conditions, to the ban on discharges of substances in List I.

It also lays down special rules for artificial recharges of groundwater intended for public water supplies.

The competent authorities of the Member States must keep an inventory of authorisations:

  • of discharges of substances in List I;
  • of direct discharges of substances in List II;
  • of artificial recharges for the purpose of groundwater management.

The Member States concerned must inform one another in the event of discharges into transboundary groundwater.

Member States may introduce more stringent measures than those laid down in this Directive.

Every three years, reports by the Member States on the implementation of Directive 80/68/EEC and other relevant Directives, drawn up on the basis of a questionnaire or outline drafted by the Commission in accordance with the procedure laid down in Directive 91/692/EEC. The Commission is responsible for publishing a report on the basis of this information.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 80/68/EEC 19.12.1979 19.12.1983 OJ L 20 of 26.01.1980
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 91/692/EEC 23.12.1991 01.01.1993 OJ L 377 of 31.12.1991

Related Acts

of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2000 establishing a framework for Community action in the field of water policy [Official Journal L 327 of 22.12.2000].
This Directive repeals Directive 80/68/EC as of 21 December 2013.

Commission Decision 92/446/EEC of 27 July 1992 concerning questionnaires relating to Directives in the water sector [Official Journal L 247 of 27.08.1992].

This Decision draws up the outlines of questionnaires needed to monitor the implementation of and compliance with the provisions of all Directives in the water sector, including Directive 80/68/EEC.

 

Quality of drinking water

Quality of drinking water

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Quality of drinking water

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Quality of drinking water

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 98/83/EC of 3 November 1998 on the quality of water intended for human consumption [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Directive is intended to protect human health by laying down healthiness and purity requirements which must be met by drinking water within the European Union (EU).

Drinking water

The Directive applies to all water intended for human consumption apart from natural mineral waters and waters which are medicinal products.

General obligations

Member States shall ensure that such drinking water:

  • does not contain any concentration of micro-organisms, parasites or any other substance which constitutes a potential human health risk;
  • meets the minimum requirements (microbiological and chemical parameters and those relating to radioactivity) laid down by the Directive.

They will take any other action needed in order to guarantee the healthiness and purity of water intended for human consumption.

Quality standards

Member States shall lay down the parametric values corresponding at least to the values set out in the Directive. Where parameters are not set out in the Directive limit values must be laid down by the Member States if necessary to protect health.

Controls

The Directive requires Member States to regularly monitor the quality of water intended for human consumption by using the methods of analysis specified in the Directive, or equivalent methods. For this purpose they shall determine the sampling points and draw up monitoring programmes.

Corrective action and restrictions on use

Where the parametric values are not attained the Member States concerned shall ensure that the corrective action needed is taken as quickly as possible in order to restore water quality.

Regardless of compliance, or otherwise, with the parametric values, Member States shall prohibit the distribution of drinking water or shall restrict its use and shall take any action needed where that water constitutes a potential human health hazard. Consumers shall be informed of any such action.

Exceptions

The Directive shall provide the Member States with scope to provide for exemptions from the parametric values up to a maximum value, provided that:

  • the exemption does not constitute a human health hazard;
  • there is no other reasonable means of maintaining the distribution of drinking water in the area concerned;
  • the exemption must be as restricted in time as possible and not exceed three years (it being possible to renew the exemption for two further three-year periods).

Any exemption granted must be accompanied by a detailed justification except if the Member State concerned feels that failure to meet the limit value is not serious and may be quickly remedied. Water sold in bottles or containers may not be exempted.

Any Member State granting an exemption must inform the following thereof:

  • the population affected;
  • the Commission within a two-month period if the exemption covers the distribution of more than 1000 m³ per day on average, or supplies for more than 5000 persons.

Quality guarantees on the processes, equipment and materials

Neither the materials or substances used in new installations for preparing and distributing drinking water may not continue to be present in drinking water beyond a strictly necessary level.

Re-examination

At least every five years the Commission shall re-examine the parameters laid down by the Directive in the light of scientific and technical progress. It will be assisted in that process by a Committee comprising representatives of the Member States.

Information and reports

Every three years Member States shall publish a report on the quality of drinking water for its consumers. On the basis of those reports the Commission will, every three years, draw up a summary report on the quality of the water intended for human consumption within the Community.

Deadline for compliance

Within five years at the latest Member States shall take any action needed in order to guarantee that water quality complies with the Directive. In exceptional cases that period may be extended provided that it does not exceed three years.

Repeal

Directive 98/83/EC replaces Directive 80/778/EEC from 25 December 2003.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Directive 98/83/EC

25.12.1998

25.12.2000

OJ L 330 of 05.12.1998

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 596/2009

7.8.2009

OJ L 188 of 18.7.2009

The successive amendments and corrections to Directive 98/83/EC have been incorporated in the original text. This consolidated versionis for reference only.

Pricing and long-term management of water

Pricing and long-term management of water

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Pricing and long-term management of water

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Pricing and long-term management of water

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, European Parliament and Economic and Social Committee: Pricing and sustainable management of water resources [COM(2000) 477 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Water management is one of the European Commission’s environmental priorities. The framework directive on water sets out the guidelines for water policy in Europe for the decades ahead. It more especially promotes the use of pricing and taxation as an incentive for consumers to use water resources in a more sustainable manner and to recover the cost of water services per sector of the economy. It is with this in view that the Commission has prepared its communication on the pricing and sustainable management of water resources. Its aim is to enable a fruitful political debate to take place on this matter and to inform those concerned.

The Commission stresses that this communication should not be taken as solely advocating pricing in order to solve water-resource problems. However, this must be taken into due consideration and be combined with other instruments as part of drawing up of management plans for water resources at individual catchment-area level.

Water and water policy in Europe

The sustainability of water resources is threatened in several of Europe’s regions. By way of an illustration one may mention the salination of groundwater, the reduced flow in many water courses, and the diffuse pollution that can be attributed to agriculture.

This being the case, the use of economic instruments (taxes, duties, financial assistance, negotiable permits) has gained increasing importance and was fully legitimised in the United Nations’ Rio Declaration on the Environment and Development in 1992. The central environmental role to be played by economic instruments is also recognised at Community level. The Treaty considers that, in particular, the “polluter pays” principle is an underlying principle of European environmental policies. Furthermore the framework directive on water advocates a boosting of the part played by pricing in order to improve the sustainability of water resources.

The “water price” is defined as being “the unit or overall amount paid by users for all of the services that they receive in terms of water, including the environment” (example: wastewater treatment).

Water pricing policies in theory and in practice

In order to achieve the environmental aims and to include the major economic principles, water pricing policies must reflect the following costs:

  • Financial costs: direct costs embracing the costs of supply and administration, operation and maintenance, and also capital costs.
  • Environmental costs: cost of the waste caused by water use on the ecosystem, for example: salination or degradation of productive soils).
  • Resource costs: cost of resource depletion leading to the disappearance of certain options for other users.

Each user must bear the cost of consuming water. If pricing is to promote better water-resource use prices must be directly linked to the amount of water consumed and/or pollution produced.

There are major differences between the water pricing systems in the Member States. In the south European countries for example agriculture, which is a major water consumer, pays for its water at preferential rates (because of various subsidies). Recently pricing played an increasing part in the water policy in many Member Sates. In the countries which joined the European Union in 2004 water pricing is also expected to expand, mainly owing to the major cost of alignment with the Community patrimony.

The water pricing policy enables the pressure on water resources to be restricted and infrastructures to be maintained. Moreover, a harmonised approach to water pricing is needed in order to avoid any distortions in competition arising from uneven application of economic principles on the internal market.

Promoting water pricing policies enabling the sustainability of water management to be improved.

It is necessary, in order to map out a pricing policy, to be aware of the following factors:

  • The demand for water which, in agriculture, for example, is still not well understood. Measuring methods (meters, use of satellite scanning …) must be developed.
  • The elasticity of the demand for water as compared with its price.
  • The financial cost of water supplies.
  • The environmental cost of the resource. However, it is difficult to assess those costs.

It is relevant to incorporate a variable factor (quality, pollution) into pricing structures in order that these may genuinely provide an incentive.

For reasons of cost and political acceptability, the introduction of a new pricing system will have to be gradual. Moreover social-order considerations must be taken into account in water pricing, but must not take precedence where sustainable water resource management is under threat. Social back-up policies will be preferred to these. Systematic ex ante and ex post assessment of the effects on demand of any such pricing policies is needed.

The matter of scale is also to be considered. Financial costs are better assessed and managed at water-service distribution level, but in environmental terms it is that of water catchment area that is the most appropriate. This may cause difficulties in the case of cross-border catchment areas (for example the Rhine river basin): the cost must then be shared among the interested parties and the administrations in the various countries.

In order to ease the transition to incentive pricing, it might be necessary to adapt the existing institutional framework. It would, in particular, be necessary to ensure transparency (via information and communication policies and quality/price comparisons) and the involvement of the public in water pricing polices. Monitoring water prices in order to ensure that these reflect costs in an adequate manner must also take place.

The water pricing policies must be combined with other measures in order to solve the qualitative and quantitative water resource management problems. It must also ensure better synergy between water pricing policy and the other European Union’s policies: the common agricultural policy or the structural and cohesion policies must also provide incentives for better use of water. The European Commission’s framework research and technological development programme also has a key role to play in providing new economic assessment and analysis methodologies.

Implementation of the framework directive on water will provide the necessary impetus for formulating water-price policies based on the factors set out in this communication.

Maritime safety: compensation fund for oil pollution damage

Maritime safety: compensation fund for oil pollution damage

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime safety: compensation fund for oil pollution damage

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Maritime safety: compensation fund for oil pollution damage

Proposal

Proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the establishment of a fund for the compensation of oil pollution damage in European waters and related measures [COM (2000) 802 final – Official Journal C 120 E, 24 April 2001].

Summary

Background

This proposal for a regulation forms part of the second package of Community measures on maritime safety. Following the sinking of the Erika, the Commission came to the conclusion that the existing liability and compensation arrangements failed to offer sufficient guarantees against oil pollution damage.

The objective of this proposal from the Commission is to set up a supplementary fund covering liability and compensation for pollution damage caused by oil tankers, designated COPE (Compensation for Oil Pollution in European waters fund), to pay compensation to the victims of oil spills in European waters.

The COPE Fund would top up the CLC (Convention on Liability of the Carrier) and IOPC (International Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution Damage) systems in force at international level.

Content

The objective of this proposal is to ensure adequate compensation for pollution damage in EU waters resulting from the transport of oil by sea and to introduce a financial penalty to be imposed on any person found to have contributed to an oil pollution incident.

The proposed regulation would apply to safeguard measures to prevent or minimise such risks and to pollution damage caused:

  • in the territory, including the territorial sea, of a Member State;
  • in the exclusive economic zone of a Member State, established in accordance with international law;
  • if a Member State has not established such a zone, in an area beyond the territorial sea of that State and extending not more than 200 nautical miles.

A Fund for Compensation for Oil Pollution will be established to provide compensation to the extent that the protection afforded by the CLC Convention and the IOPC Convention is inadequate.

To this end, the COPE Fund will pay compensation to any person who is entitled to compensation for pollution damage under the IOPC Convention but who has been unable to obtain full and adequate compensation under that Convention.

No compensation will be paid by the COPE Fund until the Commission has approved the results of the relevant assessment of entitlement.

The Commission may decide not to pay compensation to any person in a contractual relationship with the carrier in respect of the operation during which the incident occurred.

Each Member State will be required to communicate to the Commission the name and address of any person who is liable to contribute to the COPE Fund. For the purposes of ascertaining who are liable to contribute to the COPE Fund and of establishing, where applicable, the quantities of oil to be taken into account for each such person, a list must be compiled and kept up to date by the Commission.

Member States will also have to lay down a system for imposing financial penalties on any person found by a court of law to have contributed, by wrongful intentional or grossly negligent acts or omissions, to an incident causing or threatening to cause oil pollution.

Three years after the entry into force of the regulation at the latest, the Commission will submit a report on the efforts made at international level to improve the international insurance and compensation arrangements.

Procedure

Codecision procedure (COD/2002/0326)

On 12 June 2002 the Commission adopted an amended proposal.
On 12 June 2002 the amended proposal was submitted to the European Parliament.

 

Maritime safety: prohibition of organotin compounds on ships

Maritime safety: prohibition of organotin compounds on ships

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime safety: prohibition of organotin compounds on ships

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Maritime safety: prohibition of organotin compounds on ships

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 782/2003 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 14 April 2003 on the prohibition of organotin compounds on ships [Official Journal L 115 of 9.5.2003].

Summary

Background

Based on the strategic objectives set out in the Commission White Paper on transport policy, the purpose of this Community regulation is to reduce the adverse effects on the environment caused by organotin compounds used on ships.

Organotin compounds are chemicals from anti-fouling paints used on boat hulls and nets. These surface coatings are designed to prevent the attachment of algae, molluscs and other organisms which slow down vessel speeds.

Organotin compounds pose a definite risk to aquatic fauna and flora. During the ’60s the chemical industry developed efficacious anti-fouling paints using metallic compounds, in particular the organotin compounds tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT).

These chemicals are highly toxic for sealife (larvae, mussels, oysters and fish). For this reason, they have been banned in many European countries, while several Community directives (Directive 76/769/EEC and the successive amendments thereto) provide for regular monitoring of organotin compound levels.

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems (AFS Convention) adopted at an IMO diplomatic conference in October 2001 bans application of TBT coatings on ships with effect from 1 January 2003 followed, as of 1 January 2008, by the elimination of active TBT coatings from ships.

The AFS Convention will enter into force 12 months after at least 25 States representing 25% of the world’s merchant shipping tonnage have ratified it.

Considering that non-polluting substitutes are available today, the AFS Convention prohibits the use of all harmful organotin compounds in anti-fouling paints applied to ships. At the moment, only organotin compounds are banned, but the Convention will also establish a mechanism to prevent potential future uses of other harmful substances in anti-fouling systems, in line with the precautionary principle.

Content

The regulation directly imposes on shipowners detailed requirements which must be observed throughout the Community.

The regulation applies to:

  • ships flying the flag of a Member State,
  • ships not flying the flag of a Member State but operating under the authority of a Member State, and
  • ships entering port in a Member State but not covered by the two previous points.

The regulation does not apply to any warship, naval auxiliary or other ship owned by a State and used on government service.

As from 1 July 2003, organotin compounds which act as biocides in anti-fouling systems may no longer be applied on ships flying the flag of a Member State. As from 1 January 2008 ships entering port in a Member State must either bear no coating of organotin compounds which act as biocides or must bear a second topcoat forming a barrier to prevent organotin compounds leaching from the non-compliant anti-fouling undercoat.

The regulation introduces a survey and certification system for ships flying the flag of a Member State. It stipulates that:

  • ships of 400 gross tonnage and above must be surveyed, irrespective of the voyage;
  • ships of 24 metres or more in length, but less than 400 gross tonnage, must simply carry a declaration of compliance with the regulation or with the AFS Convention. No particular survey or certificate is specified in the regulation to avoid overburdening the administrations in the Member States;
  • no survey or certification is envisaged for ships of less than 24 metres in length, i.e. mainly pleasure craft and fishing boats.

As regards recognition of certificates and of statements of compliance:

  • as from 1 July 2003, Member States must recognise any AFS certificate issued by or on behalf of a Member State;
  • as from 1 July 2004, Member States must recognise any AFS statement of compliance issued on behalf of a Member State;
  • as from 1 July 2003, Member States must recognise any AFS declaration.

By 10 May 2004 at the latest, the Commission must report to the European Parliament and to the Council on progress with ratification of the AFS Convention and, if necessary, propose amendments to speed up the process of reducing pollution by harmful anti-fouling compounds.

References

Act Date
of entry into force
Final date for implementation in the Member States
Regulation (EC) No 782/2003 10.05.2003