Category Archives: The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supported the country’s preparations (see Serbia) in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

  • Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

ADOPTION OF THE EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS

  • Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Employment and Social Policy
  • Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Economic and monetary affairs
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Competition
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Environment
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Information society and media
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Education and culture
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Taxation
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Transport
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Justice and security
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Internal market
  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Research and new technologies

Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Document or Iniciative

Council Decision 2008/212/EC of 18 February 2008 on the principles, priorities and conditions contained in the Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and repealing Decision 2006/57/EC.

Summary

The Accession Partnership with the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia is the main instrument for helping the Government of the FYROM to realise the country’s prospect of joining the European Union (EU). After submitting its application for membership on 22 March 2004, the FYROM was granted candidate-country status by the European Council on 17 December 2005.

The Accession Partnership with the FYROM is an instrument of the stabilisation and association process set up under the Thessaloniki agenda (2003) for the western Balkan countries. The European Partnerships and the Accession Partnerships for the western Balkan countries have Regulation (EC) No 533/2004 as their legal basis.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of the Partnership is to register in a common reference framework:

  • the priority areas where reforms and efforts are required; these are identified according to the country’s requirements and involve the adoption and implementation of appropriate legislation;
  • guidelines for financial assistance for taking action in these priority areas;
  • the principles and conditions governing implementation of the Partnership.

The Council of the European Union adopts the Accession Partnership, as well as its subsequent amendments, by a qualified majority on the basis of a proposal from the Commission.

The current Partnership supersedes the Partnership of 2006 and updates it by identifying new priorities. European Partnerships are flexible instruments designed to reflect the progress made by the countries concerned and to highlight the efforts still required in other areas as identified by the Commission’s evaluations.

With a view to achieving the objectives identified in the Accession Partnership, the FYROM must adopt an action plan setting out procedures and a programme for implementing the priorities of the Partnership.

Implementation of the Partnership is monitored within the framework of the stabilisation and association process and its mechanisms, in particular the annual evaluation report presented by the Commission.

PRIORITIES

The Accession Partnership establishes priorities which are both realistic and attainable goals. In this regard, a distinction is made between short-term and medium-term priorities, which are expected to be achieved within one to two years and within three to four years respectively.

The priorities identified for the FYROM relate to its capacity to meet:

  • the Copenhague criteria of 1993;
  • the conditions set for the Stabilisation and Association Process (Council conclusions of 27 April 1997 and 21 and 22 June 1999);
  • the Zagreb declaration of 2000;
  • the Thessaloniki agenda of 2003.

The short- and medium-term priorities are classified as follows:

  • the key priorities are short-term priorities. They focus on the application of the Stabilisation and Association Agreement (SAA), the establishment of a constructive political dialogue, the implementation of the police law, the demonstration that sustainable progress has been made in implementing judicial reforms and anti-corruption legislation, the civil service, including the prevention of political interference in the recruitment and the career of officials, the creation of jobs and the consolidation of the rule of law in order to improve the business climate;
  • the requirements relating to the political criteria cover democracy and the rule of law (implementation of the Ohrid Framework Agreement, the electoral process, the public authorities, the administration, the judicial system, the fight against corruption); respect for human rights and the protection of minorities (through compliance with international and European standards, such as those of the Council of Europe; the creation of law-enforcement bodies and judicial and prison administrations; the fight against discrimination; the protection of human, women’s and children’s rights; the equitable representation of communities and access to education for minorities); regional questions and international obligations (cooperation with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY); regional cooperation and dialogue, including the implementation of the Central European Free Trade Agreement; good neighbourly relations, and in particular finding a negotiated and mutually acceptable solution for the country’s name; implementation of cooperation agreements with neighbouring countries, notably on cross-border cooperation, the fight against organised crime, trafficking and smuggling, the management of external borders, readmission and the environment);
  • the requirements relating to the economic criteria for strengthening legal certainty for economic operators (the registration of land and real estate) and the functioning of the market economy; the improvement of public services (creation and modernisation of infrastructures); the viability of the electricity market; the quality of public spending and of education; labour market performance and the reduction of unemployment; the integration of the informal economy into the formal economy and the modernisation of national infrastructures for improving the economy’s competitiveness, particularly with regard to energy and transport;
  • the ability to assume the obligations of membership concerning the adoption and implementation of the Community acquis regarding a certain number of EU policies classified under headings.

FINANCIAL FRAMEWORK

The FYROM receives financial assistance to help it fulfil the accession criteria. The Accession Partnership serves as a reference instrument for determining the different areas where funds are allocated (according to identified priorities). The decisions which establish the various financial instruments and programming documents provide the actual legal framework for the financial assistance.

The Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) is the sole financial instrument for candidate countries and potential candidate countries for the period 2007-2013. It replaces the CARDS Programme, the financial instrument of the stabilisation and association process for the countries of the western Balkans covering the period 2000-2006. Over this period, a total of EUR 298.2 million was allocated to the FYROM under CARDS.

Financial assistance for national programmes under the IPA for 2007-2010 should be EUR 401.1 million, in line with the multiannual indicative financial framework (MIFF) for 2009-2011 (including 2007 and 2008) .

Community assistance is conditional on recipient countries abiding by the essential elements which govern their relations with the EU, particularly the effective implementation of reforms. Under the Accession Partnership, the FYROM is required to comply with the Copenhagen criteria and the priorities defined by the Partnership. Failure to meet these requirements could result in the Council suspending financial assistance.

The FYROM also receives funding from the European Investment Bank (EIB), principally within the framework of the mechanism for granting regional loans to the EU’s south-eastern neighbours. This mandate covers the candidate countries and the countries of the western Balkans. The financing provided by the EIB takes the form of grants and loans.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision 2008/212/EC 22.3.2008 OJ L 80 of 19.3.2008

Related Acts

Communication of 5 March 2008 from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council entitled “Eastern Balkans: Enhancing the European perspective” [COM(2008)127 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Communication of 27 January 2006 entitled “The Western Balkans on the road to the EU: consolidating stability and raising prosperity” [COM(2006) 27 – Not published in the Official Journal].

BILATERAL RELATIONS

Stabilisation and Association Agreement between the European Communities and their Member States, of the one part, and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, of the other part [Official Journal L 84 of 20.3.2004].

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Council Regulation (EC) No 1085/2006 of 17 July 2006 establishing an Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) [Official Journal L 210 of 31.7.2006].

Multiannual indicative financial framework (MIFF) for:

  • 2008 to 2010 [COM(2006) 672 final – Not published in the Official Journal];
  • 2009 to 2011 [COM(2007) 689 final – Not published in the Official Journal.

Multiannual indicative planning document 2007-2009 for the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (pdf )
.

EVALUATION

The reports are available on the website of the Commission’s Directorate-General for Enlargement.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Health and consumers

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Report from the Commission – [COM (2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report from the European Commission signals certain progress in the area of consumer protection and health. However, alignment with the acquis in certain areas still remains quite limited.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The acquis in this area covers protection of the economic interests of consumers in a number of specific sectors (misleading and comparative advertising, price indication, consumer credit, unfair contract terms, distance and doorstep selling, package travel, timeshare, injunctions for the protection of consumers’ interests, certain aspects of the sale of consumer goods and associated guarantees), as well as general safety of consumer goods (liability for defective products, dangerous imitations and general safety of goods) and distance marketing of consumer financial services. The Member States of the European Union (EU) must transpose the acquis into their national law, and establish administrative structures and independent implementation bodies which ensure real market surveillance and effective application of the acquis. They must also provide appropriate judicial and out-of-court dispute resolution mechanisms. Furthermore, they must ensure that consumers are informed and educated and that consumer organisations play an active role. This chapter also covers certain binding rules with regard to public health.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

There was some progress in the area of consumer and health protection. Efforts are still hampered by the limited financial resources and weak operational structures.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report noted insufficient progress in the area of consumer protection and market surveillance. In addition, the Report noted the lack of resources allocated to improving the health sector.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2009 report gives an account of progress concerning consumer protection, but the State is still lacking an effective and transparent system of market surveillance.

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report presents the progress achieved by the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia with a view to complete alignment with the Community acquis in the field of consumer protection. The main progress concerns the development of administrative capacity to ensure consumer protection. A new, more transparent and effective market surveillance system is not yet in place.

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – External relations, Common Foreign and Security Policy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

In its 2011 Report, the European Commission states that alignment with the acquis on the common commercial policy has progressed. Advancements in the field of foreign and security policy are also adequate.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

In this field the Community acquis mainly comprises directly binding legislation which does not require transposition into national law. EU legislation results from the Union’s multi-lateral and bi-lateral agreements on matters of trade policy as well as from a certain number of autonomous preferential trade measures. In the fields of development and humanitarian aid, Member States must comply with the relevant EU legislation and international commitments and equip themselves with the capacities required to participate in EU policies in these sectors. Candidate countries are invited to progressively align their policies with regard to third countries, and their positions within international organisations, with the policies and positions adopted by the Union and its Member States.

The Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) are based on legal acts, legally binding international agreements in particular, and on policy documents. The acquis comprises declarations, actions and policy agreements. Member States must be in a position to conduct political dialogue under the framework of the CFSP, to align with the EU’s declarations, to take part in EU action and to apply the appropriate sanctions and restrictive measures. Candidate countries are invited to progressively align with the EU’s declarations and to apply sanctions and restrictive measures if required.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Progress was made in the area of external relations, notably in the alignment towards the common commercial policy.

There was also progress in the area of foreign, security and defence policy. The country took measures to ensure better coordination between the competent authorities in the implementation of international restrictive measures. It aligned with all EU declarations and Council decisions and showed continued commitment to participate in civil and military and crisis management operations.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The situation presented by the 2010 Report is satisfactory. The country cooperates fully with the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court. Furthermore, the country plays an active part in bilateral and regional cooperation initiatives, including for maintaining good neighbourly relations.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Regional policy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

In its 2011 Report, the Commission states that the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia has progressed in implementing the operational programme for regional development and human resources development.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

In the field of regional policy, the acquis essentially comprises framework regulations and implementing regulations which do not require transposition into national law. They define the rules applicable to the development, approval and implementation of the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund, which each reflect the territorial organisation of the country. These programmes are negotiated and agreed with the Commission, but their implementation is the responsibility of the Member States. When choosing and implementing projects, Member States must comply with Community legislation in general, for example in the areas of public procurement, competition and the environment. They must have a suitable institutional framework and administrative capacities to ensure that the programming, implementation, monitoring and assessment of projects are carried out in a rational and cost-effective manner with regards to management and financial control.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Some progress was noted in the area of regionaldevelopment and coordination of structural funds. There has been some progress in the implementation of the IPA components concerning operational programme for the regional development and human resources development. Inadequate expertise and insufficient institutional coordination has led to considerable delays. It is necessary to strengthen ownership of the programme implementation by the authorities.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its 2010 Report, the Commission indicated that additional efforts were required with regard to regional development and the coordination of structural funds. Implementation of the regional development programme had been significantly delayed.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enterprise > International dimension and enlargement

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report from the European Commission outlines satisfactory, but uneven progress in the area of enterprise and industrial policy.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU industrial policy seeks to promote industrial strategies which strengthen competitiveness by accelerating adaptation to structural changes and encouraging a framework conducive to the creation and development of enterprises across the EU and to national and foreign investment. It also seeks to improve the overall business environment in which small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operate. It presupposes a process of privatisation and restructuring (see also Chapter 8 – Competition policy). The European strategy in this area essentially involves defining fundamental principles and drawing up industrial policy declarations. The implementation of enterprise policy and industrial policy requires an adequate administrative capacity at national, regional and local level.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Progress was good but uneven in the field of enterprise and industrial policy. There have been some achievements in simplification of the legislation and administrative procedures for business operation and reduction of business costs. Enterprise support measures remain scattered within several programmes.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report presents the reforms and strategies which have enabled improvements to the business environment and support measures for the sector, in particular for the benefit of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report states that alignment with the acquis is relatively satisfactory, particularly with respect to the regulatory framework and sector policy. However, it highlights the necessity for further efforts in improving the business environment.


Another Normative about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Enterprise

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report from the European Commission outlines satisfactory, but uneven progress in the area of enterprise and industrial policy.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU industrial policy seeks to promote industrial strategies which strengthen competitiveness by accelerating adaptation to structural changes and encouraging a framework conducive to the creation and development of enterprises across the EU and to national and foreign investment. It also seeks to improve the overall business environment in which small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) operate. It presupposes a process of privatisation and restructuring (see also Chapter 8 – Competition policy). The European strategy in this area essentially involves defining fundamental principles and drawing up industrial policy declarations. The implementation of enterprise policy and industrial policy requires an adequate administrative capacity at national, regional and local level.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Progress was good but uneven in the field of enterprise and industrial policy. There have been some achievements in simplification of the legislation and administrative procedures for business operation and reduction of business costs. Enterprise support measures remain scattered within several programmes.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report presents the reforms and strategies which have enabled improvements to the business environment and support measures for the sector, in particular for the benefit of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report states that alignment with the acquis is relatively satisfactory, particularly with respect to the regulatory framework and sector policy. However, it highlights the necessity for further efforts in improving the business environment.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Economic and monetary affairs

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Economic and monetary affairs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Economic and monetary affairs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Economic and monetary affairs

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report states that some progress has been made on economic and monetary policy matters. The country has made good progress in establishing a functioning market economy and has improved dialogue with the business community. However, weaknesses in the rule of law continue to impede the proper functioning of the internal market of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. In addition, financial supervisory bodies still lack independence.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU legislation on economic and monetary policy contains specific rules requiring the independence of central banks in Member States, prohibiting direct financing of the public sector by the Central Bank and prohibiting privileged access of the public sector to financial institutions. Upon accession, new Member States will be expected to coordinate their economic policies and will be subject to the provisions of the Stability and Growth Pact on budget monitoring matters. These States are also committed to complying with the criteria laid down in the Treaty in order to be able to adopt the euro. Until their adoption of the euro, they will participate in Economic and Monetary Union as a Member State with derogation and will treat their exchange rates as a matter of common concern.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

The economy of the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia started to recover in the second half of 2010, benefitting from external demand and increased investment, in particular in construction. In late 2010, the government agreed with the IMF on a pre-cautionary credit line. This should strengthen international markets confidence. Structural reforms have continued. However, high structural unemployment, in particular among the young and poorly educated, remains a major cause of concern. Institutional capacities of the public administration and of regulatory and supervisory agencies are still inadequate.

As regards the economic criteria, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia continues to be well advanced. In some areas, it has made further progress towards becoming a functioning market economy, notably by facilitating company registration, accelerating judiciary procedures, improving the functioning of financial markets, further simplifying the regulatory framework and improving communication with the business community. The country should be able to cope with competitive pressures and market forces within the Union in the medium term, provided that it vigorously implements its reform programme in order to reduce significant structural weaknesses.

The country has maintained a broad consensus on the essentials of economic policies. The economic dialogue with the business community has improved. The stance of monetary policy, based on the de facto peg to the euro, supported growth and contributed to macroeconomic stability. Fiscal policy maintained its stability orientation. Some further progress has been achieved in facilitating market entry and in simplifying the regulatory framework. The duration of bankruptcy procedures has been further reduced and real estate registration is practically completed. The financial sector started to recover from the global financial crisis. Competition in this sector has slightly improved, as well as the level of financial intermediation.

Weaknesses in the rule of law continue to impede the proper functioning of the market economy. Public administration efficiency is still low, reflecting heavy procedures, weaknesses in staffing and a high turnover of officials. Some regulatory and supervisory agencies continue to lack the necessary independence and resource allocation to fulfil their functions effectively. Contract enforcement is still difficult, which hampers the business environment, in particular for small and medium sized enterprises. The quality of education and of the human capital is low. Physical capital needs further modernisation and deepening.

There was significant progress in the area of economic and monetary policy, especially in adoption of the relevant central bank legislation. The quality of the pre-accession economic programme has improved. There was good progress in several areas of statistics; substantial efforts are still needed to improve in particular economic statistics.

Progress in the area of financial control was related mainly to legislative alignment, and efforts are called for to ensure its implementation, especially in relation to the establishment of Financial Management and Control systems. The State Audit Office’s administrative capacity has been further strengthened; however its independence remains to be anchored in the Constitution. There is no particular progress to report under financial and budgetary provisions. The administrative framework for the application of the own resources framework is still not in place.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2010 Report indicates that the country suffered little from the economic and financial crisis, due to its low level of exposure to the international economy. Structural reforms were therefore able to continue. However, the progress is inadequate for reducing the levels of unemployment and improving the business environment.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

In its 2008 Report, the Commission presented encouraging results achieved by the country concerning the financial and economic stability of the market. However, the reform process had slowed down in 2007 and little new progress had been recorded with regard to alignment with the acquis. The administrative capacity remained inadequate, particularly at local level.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Justice and security

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Justice and security

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Justice and security

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Justice and security

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report states limited progress concerning the independence and efficiency of the judicial system, and regarding anti-corruption policy. The freedom of expression of the media remains a concern. However, the Report highlights satisfactory progress made concerning the external borders and Schengen, and on matters of judicial cooperation and customs cooperation.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

EU policies in the area of justice and home affairs aim at maintaining and developing the Union as an area of freedom, security and justice. On issues such as border control, visas, migration, asylum, police cooperation, combating organised crime and cooperation with regard to drug trafficking, customs cooperation and judicial cooperation in civil and criminal matters, Member States need to be equipped to ensure that they are able to implement adequate standards and an increasing number of common rules. In order to do this, it is important first and foremost that the bodies responsible for applying the law and other competent bodies have robust and integrated administrative capacities which comply with the set standards. The setting up of a professional, reliable and efficient police force is of paramount importance. The Schengen acquis, which entails the lifting of internal border controls in the EU, is the most detailed element of the EU’s policies on justice, freedom and security. However, substantial parts of the Schengen acquis are implemented by the new Member States, following a separate decision taken by the Council after their accession.

EU policies relating to the judicial system and fundamental rights aim at pursuing and aiding the development of the Union as an area for freedom, security and justice. The establishment of an independent and efficient judicial system is of paramount importance. Impartiality, integrity and a high level of competency regarding the rulings made by courts are essential in maintaining the rule of law. This requires a firm commitment to eliminate all external influences on the judicial system and to dedicate the appropriate financial resources and training facilities to it. It is necessary to offer the necessary legal guarantees to ensure fair judicial procedures. Member States must also tackle corruption effectively insofar as it represents a risk to the stability of democratic institutions and the rule of law. It is necessary to establish a solid judicial framework and reliable institutions to which a coherent policy for preventing and dissuading corruption may be applied. Member States must ensure that the fundamental rights and the rights of EU citizens, as guaranteed by the acquis and the Charter for Fundamental Rights, are respected.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Some limited progress can be reported on independence and efficiency of the judiciary, including the amendment of the Minister of Justice’s role on the Judicial Council and the establishment of the High Administrative Court. Further efforts are needed as regards the evaluation and security of tenure of judges.

Some limited progress was made on anticorruption policy. Legislative alignment has continued and systematic verification of assetdeclarations was introduced. A track record in handling high level corruption cases has yet tobe established.

As regards fundamental rights, while the legal and institutional framework is broadly in place, better implementation is needed. A dialogue has been launched to address serious concerns regarding freedom of expression in the media. Some progress was made as regards cultural rights and minorities. The Ohrid Framework Agreement remains an essential element for democracy and rule of law in the country.

In the area of justice, freedom and security, good progress can be reported on external borders and Schengen, judicial cooperation and customs cooperation. The border police still lack adequate technical equipment, budgetary means. Some progress has been achieved on migration, visa policy, police cooperation and the fight against organised crime. The implementation of the police reform has continued, however structural problems, understaffing and lack of budgetary provision still persist. Implementation in the field of asylum remains insufficient, including on the provision of legal aid, interpretation and access to social rights.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The 2010 Report presents progress made concerning police cooperation, the management of external borders and the Schengen agreement. In the area of asylum and visa policy, visa liberalisation has been established.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The October 2009 report notes that the country has made good progress on the fight against organised crime and drugs. To reform the police, it has improved its administrative capacity; yet, further efforts are still needed to develop human resources management. International police cooperation at regional and EU level is being strengthened. In general, the country’s legislative and administrative capacity is now better aligned with the acquis.

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2008 report indicated that there had been progress in particular in the fight against organised crime and in the field of police cooperation. In addition, there had been improvements in the operational capacity of the competent authorities. Nevertheless, efforts needed to be made to strengthen the country’s administrative capacity and to further fight organised crime.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Internal market

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Internal market

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Internal market

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Internal market

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

The 2011 Report highlights different progress made concerning free movement of goods, freedom of movement for workers, right of establishment and freedom to provide services. However, on matters of investigation, prosecution and convictions of piracy and counterfeiting, significant progress still needs to be made.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The principle of the free movement of goods implies that products must be traded freely from one part of the Union to another. In a number of sectors, this general principle is complemented by a harmonised regulatory framework, following the “old approach” (imposing precise product specifications) or the “new approach” (imposing general product requirements). The harmonised European product legislation, which has to be transposed, represents the largest part of the acquis under this chapter. In addition, sufficient administrative capacity to notify the restrictions to trade and to apply horizontal and procedural measures in areas such as standardisation, certification, accreditation, metrology and market surveillance is essential.

The acquis in respect of the free movement of workers states that citizens of an EU Member State have the right to work in another Member State. EU migrant workers must be treated in the same manner as national workers with regard to working conditions, social benefits and tax allowances. The acquis also provides a mechanism for coordinating national social security provisions for those tax contributors and their families who move to another Member State.

Member States are required to remove all restrictions with regard to the free movement of services. Member States must ensure that the right of establishment and the freedom to provide services anywhere in the EU is not hampered by national legislation. In some sectors, the acquis prescribes harmonised rules which must be respected if the internal market is to function; this concerns mainly the financial sector (banking, insurance, investment services and securities markets). Financial institutions may carry out their activities throughout the European Union according to the principle of ‘home country control’ by opening branches or by providing cross-border services. The acquis also provides harmonised rules for some specific professions (craftsmen, traders, farmers, commercial agents), for certain information society services, and matters relating to personal data protection.

Member States must remove all restrictions on the free movement of capital between themselves, within the European Union, but also with third countries (with some exceptions) and adopt EU rules applicable to cross-border payments and to credit transfers concerning transferable securities. The money laundering and financing of terrorism directives require banks and other economic operators to identify their clients and be aware of certain operations, particularly in the case of cash transactions for high-value items. In order to tackle financial crime, it is essential that administrative and enforcement capacities are put in place, particularly by establishing cooperation between those authorities responsible for surveillance, implementing law and carrying out criminal proceedings.

The acquis on public procurement covers the general principles of transparency, equal treatment, free competition and non-discrimination. In addition, specific Community rules apply to the coordination and granting of public works, supplies and services contracts for traditional contracting entities and specific sectors. The acquis also defines the rules relating to the court procedures and means of action available. Its implementation requires specialised bodies.

The acquis relating to intellectual property rights defines the harmonised rules for the legal protection of copyright and related rights. Specific provisions are applicable to the protection of databases, data processing programmes, topographies of semi-conductors, satellite broadcasting and cable retransmission. In the field of intellectual property rights, the acquis details harmonised rules for the legal protection of trademarks and designs. Other specific provisions apply to biotechnological inventions and to pharmaceutical and phytopharmaceutical products. The acquis also establishes a Community trademark system and a Community design system.

The acquis on company law includes rules applicable to the constitution, registration, merger and division of companies. In the field of financial information, the acquis specifies the rules to be complied with regarding the presentation of consolidated annual accounts and provides simplified rules for small and medium-sized enterprises, in particular. The application of international accounting standards is obligatory for certain entities of public interest. Furthermore, the acquis also includes provisions relating to the approval, professional integrity and independence of persons responsible for legal controls.

The Customs unionacquis consists almost exclusively of legislation which is directly binding on the Member States. It includes the Community’s Customs Code and its implementing provisions; the Combined Nomenclature, Common Customs Tariff and provisions on tariff classification, customs duty relief, duty suspensions and certain tariff quotas; and other provisions such as those on customs control of counterfeit and pirated goods, drugs precursors and the export of cultural goods and on mutual administrative assistance in customs matters and transit. Member States must also have the required implementing capacities, particularly connectivity with the EU’s computerised customs systems. Customs authorities must also have sufficient capacity for implementation and compliance with the specific provisions established in related fields of the acquis, such as foreign trade.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

There has been some progress in the area of free movement of goods. The budget for the implementation of the comprehensive strategy on the horizontal institutions has increased however the framework legislation is still not fully aligned with the horizontal acquis.

There was little progress in the area of freedom of movement for workers and alignment with the acquis is still at an early stage.

In the area of the right of establishment and freedom to provide services the country is on track, particularly in the area of postal services. The level of coordination among the various bodies responsible for authorising cross-border services has also improved.

On mutual recognition of professional qualifications, the country is at an early stage.

Progress on free movement of capital was focused on enforcement in the area of combating money laundering and financing of terrorism. There are restrictions on short-term portfolio investments and on cross-border payment transfers, pending the passage to the second stage of the Stabilisation and Association Agreement.

There has been progress in the area of public procurement. Procurement procedures are more transparent and enforcement was stepped up. The legislation on concessions and Public Private Partnerships remains to be aligned with the acquis. Administrative capacity in the field of remedies and concessions, as well as at the level of contracting authorities, remains weak.

Good progress was made in the area of Company law, especially on further legislative alignment with the acquis. The legal framework in the area of auditing remains only partially aligned.

Some progress was made in enhancing the legal framework for intellectual property. The track record on investigation, prosecution and judicial handling of piracy and counterfeiting is not satisfactory and the level of awareness of intellectual property rights among the public remains low.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The 2010 Report outlines uneven progress made by the country. Institutional reform is required to ensure the freedom of movement for workers. Similarly, few preparations have been made concerning the freedom to provide services and the right of establishment. Reform is also required regarding the free movement of goods and capital.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC (2008) 1436 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 Report relates to the free movement of goods, freedom of movement for workers, the right of establishment, freedom to provide services and the free movement of capital in particular. Continuous efforts must be made in order to align the country’s legislation with the acquis, and to implement and apply it effectively.

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Ongoing enlargement > The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Energy

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report – [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia received the status of candidate country for accession to the European Union (EU) in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations for its future accession and the aligning of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, negotiations for accession had not yet started since some progress still needed to be made with regard to the objectives and conditions defined within the framework of the Partnership.

The 2011 Report outlines satisfactory progress, in particular the enactment of new framework-legislation. However, the efficiency of the internal market must be improved.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

European energy policy objectives include the improvement of competitiveness, security of energy supplies and the protection of the environment. The energy acquis consists of rules and policies, notably regarding competition and State aid (including in the coal sector), the internal energy market (for example, opening up of the electricity and gas markets, promotion of renewable energy sources, crisis management and oil stock security obligations), energy efficiency, nuclear energy and radiation protection.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Good progress was made in the energy sector, in particular the enactment of the new framework legislation and the resolution of the long-standing dispute with the distribution system operator, a major EU investor. An effectively functioning electricity market has yet to be established, and conditions for competition ensured. The financial independence of the radiation protection regulator is still not secured.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].
Despite the progress made by the country, the 2010 report highlights the need to complete the legislation and to achieve energy price rationalisation.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 report highlights progress made in the energy sector concerning, in particular, the transposition of legislation and the liberalisation of the electricity market. Some weaknesses still remain, in particular in terms of electricity prices and distribution. The energy sector is not yet completely independent and the country is not yet sufficiently well prepared.