Category Archives: Partnership for the Accession of Hungary

The aim of the Accession Partnership is to assist the authorities in the candidate country (in this case, Hungary) in their efforts to comply with the accession criteria. It covers in detail the priorities for accession preparations, in particular implementing the acquis, and forms the basis for programming pre-accession assistance from Community funds such as the Phare programme. Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003 and the official integration of the country into the European Union on 1 May 2004, the accession partnership has come to an end.

Hungary – Economic policy

Hungary – Economic policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Economic policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Economic policy

Short-term priorities:

  • consolidation of the independence of the National Bank, particularly with regard to government borrowing.

Assessment (November 2000)

No measure has been taken to consolidate the independence of the National Bank as regards government borrowing.

Assessment (November 2001)

Some progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (October 2002)

A large number of objectives have already been achieved on the basis of previous accession partnerships. The 2002 partnership report therefore focuses on very specific outstanding issues and does not provide an overview of Hungary’s preparedness for economic and monetary union.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • regular review of the joint assessment of economic policy priorities, within the Europe Agreement framework, focusing on satisfying the Copenhagen criteria for membership of the Union and the acquis in the area of economic and monetary policy (co-ordination of economic policies, submission of convergence programmes, avoidance of excessive deficits);
  • while Hungary is not required to adopt the euro immediately upon accession, it is expected to pursue policies which aim to achieve real convergence in accordance with the Union’s objectives of economic and social cohesion, and nominal convergence compatible with the ultimate goal of adoption of the euro.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary completed a first Joint Assessment in 1997 and is progressing on the second Joint Assessment. Hungary has also continued to progress in its preparation for joining Economic and Monetary Union. The government deficit has been further reduced and the inflation rate has declined. The National Bank is pursuing an exchange rate policy which will result in the forint being linked entirely to the euro by 1 January 2000.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made on this priority

Assessment (November 2001)

Some progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000)705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 – SEC(2001) 1747
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Agriculture

Hungary – Agriculture

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Agriculture

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Agriculture

Short-term priorities:

  • veterinary and plant health sector: further alignment and upgrading of inspections, particularly at the future external borders;
  • modernisation of meat and milk processing plants so that they meet Community hygiene and public health standards;
  • establishment of a vineyard register.

Assessment (November 2000)

No further alignment has been achieved in the veterinary sector. Progress has been made on plant health. There have been no new developments where controls at external borders are concerned and no progress has been made on modernising meat and milk processing plants.

Assessment (November 2001)

Efforts have been made in the veterinary field and to modernise meat and dairy production sites. An operational vineyard register should soon be established.

Assessment (October 2002)

Hungary is continuing with alignment in the veterinary and plant health sector. Border inspection posts and agri-food establishments must be brought up to standard.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • alignment with the Community’s agricultural legislation (especially as regards veterinary and plant health matters and external border controls in particular); attention to environmental aspects of agriculture and biodiversity;
  • development of the capacity to implement and enforce the common agricultural policy, in particular the fundamental management mechanisms and administrative structures needed to monitor the agricultural markets;
  • implementation of structural and rural development measures;
  • adoption and implementation of veterinary and plant health requirements;
  • upgrading of certain food processing plants and testing and diagnostic facilities;
  • restructuring of the agri-food sector.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary has made only limited progress in this area, notably by preparing to implement gradually the common agricultural policy.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made on this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

Hungary has made some progress in establishing the administrative and legal framework for the common organisations of the market. A food strategy was adopted in April 2001 and a food safety agency is due to be established.

Assessment (October 2002)

Hungary continues to make progress but efforts must be made to implement the integrated administration and control system and set up the Sapard agency.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Transport

Hungary – Transport

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Transport

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Transport

Short-term priorities:

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • further efforts on alignment with the acquis, in particular on road transport (roadworthiness tests);
  • mobilisation of necessary investment for transport infrastructure, notably extension of trans-European networks.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary has continued to develop its infrastructure. Part of the railway network has been renewed and major motorway projects in the south and east have continued. Some progress has been made in bringing Hungary’s legislation into line with the acquis in the road and rail sectors.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made with regards to this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

In the road transport sector, the alignment of legislation on admission to the profession and safety belts has been completed, and agreements have been signed on reciprocal access to the market for the international transport of passengers and goods by road, and combined transport.
With regard to railways, the Hungarian Railways Company has completed the separation of accounts for railway infrastructure and railway operations.
In the field of air transport, progress has been made with the technical requirements and administrative procedures in civil aviation, computerised reservation systems, licensing of air personnel and air carrier liability. In this connection, Hungary became a full member of the Joint Aviation Authority in 2001. However, negotiations with Hungary on the European Common Aviation Area had not yet been successful.
In the inland waterways sector, implementing legislation has been adopted on the licensing of navigation operations, the qualifications of personnel, inspectors’ qualifications and identification cards, technical requirements, and the designation of certification bodies.

Assessment (October 2002)

Legal alignment in the road transport sector has continued, particularly with regard to the control of driving time restrictions. Alignment in the railway sector, as required by the Accession Partnership, has continued, though the restructuring of MÁV has proceeded rather slowly. Alignment with the air transport acquis has continued, but further efforts are needed, notably concerning market access.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 6 December 1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002 700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Employment and social affairs

Hungary – Employment and social affairs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Employment and social affairs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Employment and social affairs

Short-term priorities

  • preparation of a national employment strategy;
  • support for the efforts of the social partners to develop and implement the acquis in the field of bipartite social dialogue.

Evaluation (November 2000)

A review of the employment situation in the country was carried out, and guidelines mirroring the European Employment Strategy prepared. A programme to improve the capacity of the social partners was launched.

Evaluation (2001)

This priority has been fully met.

Evaluation (October 2002)

Although Hungary does not yet have a national strategy on social inclusion, a number of preparatory steps were taken in 2002.
An agreement was signed with the social partners on restructuring the social dialogue system.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • setting up of appropriate labour market structures and joint assessment of employment policies with the prospect of participating in European coordination;
  • aligning labour law and legislation on health and safety at work;
  • setting up coercive structures, in particular the speedy adoption of the framework directive on the health and safety of workers;
  • applying the principle of equal opportunities for men and women;
  • continuing to develop active, autonomous social dialogue;
  • continuing to develop the social welfare system;
  • efforts to align the public health system with European standards.

Evaluation (October 1999)

In general, progress was made in incorporating Community acquis in this area. Labour law is already largely aligned with the Community acquis. Since the beginning of 1999, social dialogue has benefited from a new institutional framework, the National Labour Council, a tripartite forum in which the social partners consult one another and enter into negotiations on labour-related topics, including wages. The social welfare system is well developed. Lastly, progress was made in the area of public health. A new law was adopted which will serve as a basis for different implementation measures and activities.

Evaluation (November 2000)

No progress has been made on this priority.

Evaluation (2001)

This priority has been partially met.

Evaluation (October 2002)

Alignment with the acquis is progressing. Substantial progress has been made with regard to occupational health and safety. Transposition of the acquis in the field of public health is moving forward. The acquis relating to tobacco has not yet been implemented.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission Opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report SEC(2001) 1747 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report SEC(2002) 1404 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Regional Policy

Hungary – Regional Policy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Regional Policy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Regional Policy

Short-term priorities:

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • ongoing improvements to the budgetary procedures, financial instruments and control and monitoring mechanisms with a view to participating in the European Union’s structural programmes after accession.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary has continued to consolidate its internal financial mechanisms at central level.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress to report.

Assessment (November 2001)

Hungary has continued to adapt its legislative framework and has defined its institutional structure relating to the planning and implementation of aid provided by the Structural and Cohesion Funds. The Ministry for the Economy is still responsible for planning and programming. The Treasury should be the future paying authority. The Ministry of Finance is responsible for regulating and supervising public finances. Specific measures are under way to start an ex-ante evaluation of the national development plan with the help of the Phare programme. A computer surveillance pilot system has been set up and should be extended to the future managing authorities.

Assessment (October 2002)

Hungary has made further progress in preparing for the implementation of the structural policies. As regards territorial organisation, in January 2002 Hungary confirmed the provisional NUTS (Nomenclature of Territorial Statistical Units) classification designating the whole country as one single unit corresponding to NUTS level I, with seven regions corresponding to NUTS level II. Hungary has re-defined the responsibilities of various ministries which are going to be in charge of programming and managing the Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund. Directly attached to the Prime Minister’s office, the National Development Office will be in charge of co-ordinating the preparation of the National Development Plan and act as the managing authority for the future Objective 1 Community Support Framework (CSF) and for the Cohesion Fund. The ministries responsible for managing the future operational programmes (OPs) have been formally designated. The programming process started in January 2001 but has suffered a considerable delay, thus the first part of the national development plan and its ex ante evaluation are still under preparation. A unit responsible for partnership, information and communication has been established within the National Development Office demonstrating the willingness of the authorities to bring together the socio-economic partners for implementing the cohesion policy. With regard to monitoring and evaluation, the National Development Office has recently set up a unit comprising seven experts. The software MEMOR, developed for collecting data on pre-accession instruments, includes a “Structural Funds” module which will be tested in 2002. Concerning financial management and control, the Ministry of Finance is responsible for elaborating management and control systems as well as on-the-spot checks. Furthermore, the ministries responsible for managing the Structural Funds have established Internal Audit Units. Although there is already a system of multi-annual planning of budgetary expenditure in Hungary including provisions for transfers between budget appropriations, the government is committed to further amending the Act on Public Finance to ensure the increased flexibility of procedures. In relation to statistical information, the compilation of regional data has continued. On the other hand, there has been no development regarding the legislative framework.

Hungary has provisionally closed negotiations on the Regional Policy chapter without requesting any transitional arrangements. In order to complete its preparation for membership, Hungary’s efforts now need to focus on finalising the programming documents and strengthening the administrative capacity of the ministries and organisations concerned. New initiatives to ensure effective inter-ministerial co-ordination are also welcome. Significant progress is necessary in the technical preparation for future projects eligible for Community support. The compliance of monitoring and evaluation systems with the requirements of the Acquis Communautaire demands major developments.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002)1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Economic reform

Hungary – Economic reform

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Economic reform

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Economic reform

Short-term priorities:

  • evaluation and updating of medium-term economic policy priorities under the Europe Agreement;
  • continuation of structural reforms (in particular in the health care sector).

Assessment (October 1999)

On the whole this priority aim was achieved.

In 1999 Hungary adopted a medium-term economic strategy including sectoral policies aimed at improving conditions for growth and competitiveness. As part of the structural reform, the reorganisation of the pension system has been completed, although a comprehensive reform of the health care system was also necessary. The privatisation process was complete. Social security reform was urgently needed.

Assessment (November 2000)

The macroeconomic situation improved thanks to a reduction in the fiscal deficit and unemployment, higher growth and the introduction of structural reforms. There was still no systematic programme of reforms for the health care system. A plan for restructuring the steel industry had been drawn up but required further development. No progress had been made in establishing a functioning land market. The financial structure still had to be reformed.

Assessment (November 2001)

The macroeconomic situation remains sound. Economic growth has reached its highest level since the beginning of transition. Although privatisation has almost been completed, growth continues to be driven by foreign investment. Inflation is still relatively high. The current account has improved and fiscal consolidation has continued. After a promising start, the healthcare reform has been delayed. Land markets are developing. Restructuring of the steel industry has accelerated, and the Government has withdrawn its request for the period of grace applicable to state aid to the steel industry to be extended.

Assessment (October 2002)

Delays have occurred in reform of the health care system. Railway restructuring has been continued, and the establishment of an efficient agricultural land market has been addressed, as outlined in the action plan. Government accounting at local level has been improved.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • consolidation of conditions to promote strong growth of investments through the adoption and implementation of prudent macroeconomic policies and continuation of structural reforms.

Assessment (October 1999)

After meeting the 1998 target for the general government deficit, Hungary continued to tighten fiscal policy and to increase the transparency of the budget through the abolition of the many separate state funds and the establishment of a contingency reserve in case GDP growth slowed down or the external accounts deteriorated more than envisaged. The new economic strategy provided the framework for improving the conditions for growth and competitiveness.

Assessment (November 2000)

The Széchenyi National Development Plan was designed to promote the development of SMEs. It focused on developing business culture and skills, promoting SME networks, improving access to finance and cutting red tape.

Assessment (November 2001)

EU fiscal accounting standards confirm the picture of a gradual consolidation in public finances. The small and medium enterprise sector has continued to develop in dynamic fashion. The Hungarian National Development Plan includes a specific programme for SMEs.

Assessment (October 2002)

Hungary has continued to promote the development of SMEs, but their access to finance remains an obstacle, although there is a government support scheme for SMEs. Overall, the accession partnership priorities in the economic sector have been partially met.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97)2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98)700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999)505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2000)705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2001)700 final – SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2002)700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Hungary – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Strengthening of the institutional and administrative capacities

Short-term priorities:

  • Strengthening the relevant phytosanitary and veterinary administrations, particularly as regards infrastructures at external borders;
  • Strengthening environmental institutions, customs policy, internal financial control and regional development.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been partially implemented.

The only progress noted in the field of veterinary and phytosanitary controls is in computerisation. To meet environmental concerns, Hungary has reorganised its regional inspection services and drawn up plans to strengthen necessary institutional capacity, including a detailed programme for transposing the directive on the integrated prevention and reduction of pollution.

A new institution responsible for chemical safety and a database on waste-water and soil pollution have been set up. The Hungarian customs computer system has been improved and personnel have been trained. Measures have been adopted to strengthen financial control and undertake follow-up measures. An agency and a national fund have been set up to manage the European Union’s financial aid. Hungary must continue its efforts to set up regional control units, to consolidate the control units set up in responsible ministries and to clarify the division of tasks between the responsible ministries, local governments, the government’s control office and the public treasury in the field of ex-ante controls and financial monitoring.

Hungary has not done enough to implement the short-term regional development priority set out in the partnership for accession. The organisations responsible for programming and control are still understaffed and underfunded. Hungary must step up its budgetary efforts to consolidate local government bodies in order to achieve a measure of political and budgetary decentralisation.

Assessment (November 2000)

The administrative capacities for programming, implementing and monitoring assistance from the EU have been improved. Provisions have been introduced to comply with the EU requirements regarding the pre-accession structural instruments. Improvements have been made to implementation of Phare.

The necessary internal and external financial control bodies have been set up, but they require further strengthening to ensure that the audit results are properly followed up. For example, an anti-money laundering coordination body has been set up.

Assessment (November 2001)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (October 2002)

These priorities have not been assessed. The section on the Partnership for accession in the 2002 report focuses on issues which require more work in order to prepare Hungary for accession.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • Development of the anti-fraud unit and the National Audit Office;
  • Improving the functioning of the judicial system;
  • Training the legal profession in Community law and its application;
  • Strengthening the relevant justice and home affairs institutions (providing enough members of staff who are suitably trained, in particular in the police force, at border posts, in ministries and courts);
  • Reform of customs and tax administrations to guarantee the preparation and application of the acquis;
  • Strengthening the food inspection administration;
  • Strengthening the authority responsible for nuclear safety.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary has further consolidated the strategic framework governing financial control, making it possible to define more closely the scope of financial audits and the division of tasks between the different authorities responsible for controls. Furthermore, an integrated internal control policy has been adopted.

In the legal sector, special training programmes and courses on Community law have been set up for magistrates. Progress has been made in the fields of justice and home affairs, in particular in strengthening institutions responsible for the fight against organised crime and corruption. Border guards have been given supplementary investigative powers, including in the fight against organised crime.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made on this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

Carrying out reforms in public administration is essential for the government. Salary structures were amended, which should improve the situation of civil servants and attract qualified staff. Although considerable progress has been made in reforming the judicial system, the infrastructure of the courts remains inadequate. Alignment in terms of the fight against fraud has progressed well. Improved procedures must be implemented to manage and control Community funds. The operation of the Court of Auditors is satisfactory, although cooperation between its internal control units should be improved. Hungary is almost aligned with the acquis in the statistical field.

Assessment (October 2002)

These priorities have not been assessed.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC, 6.12.1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – internal market

Hungary – internal market

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – internal market

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – internal market

Short-term priorities:

  • certification and standardisation (further alignment of legislative measures);
  • State aid (adoption of a legislative framework, definition of the role and powers of the monitoring authority, coercive measures);
  • greater transparency through improvements in the list of State aid;
  • application of intellectual property rights;
  • further alignment of company law;
  • complete alignment of the legislation on procurement contracts to cover the local community services sector in full.

Assessment (October 1999)

There has been progress in implementing these priorities, particularly in the fields of company law and standardisation. In the intellectual property rights sector, progress has been made on copyright. Hungary should, however, persevere with these efforts, particularly concerning pharmaceutical products, in order to offer protection through retroactive patents and to change current practices to allow companies manufacturing generic medicines to carry out development work before patents expire.

Progress has also been made in the State aid sector, where the role of the authority monitoring such aid has been strengthened, ex ante monitoring rules have been drawn up and the annual reports on State aid have been improved so that they now meet the transparency criteria.

In the public contracts sector, Hungary has continued to bring its legislation in line with Community law, having excluded projects co-financed by the European Union from the national preference clause. It does, however, need to press on with the alignment of coercive measures and appeals procedures, particularly in the local community services sector.

Assessment (November 2000)

Hungary has made progress in bringing its legislation in line with Community law. However, no progress has been seen in market surveillance, nor in conformity assessment structures.

As regards the transparency of State aid, progress has been made thanks to the obligation of prior notification for some aid. The State aid inventory is still incomplete.

As for telecommunications, the Regulatory Authority has not gained any further independence or powers. The Government has prepared laws on radio and television broadcasting, but they have not been approved by Parliament.

Some reduced VAT rates have been abolished, but the rate of 12% remains in use for social reasons for certain goods and services. The principle of a code of good practice regarding enterprise taxation has been accepted. A new law on customs has prepared the way for alignment with Community law. The alignment of the Common Customs Tariff and of the Combined Nomenclature have progressed.

Assessment (November 2001)

Market surveillance and conformity assessment have been strengthened. Efforts have been made to improve the transparency of State aid, but the inventory is incomplete. The independence and powers of the regulatory authority in the telecommunications sector are to be strengthened. Good progress is being made with VAT harmonisation, but the list of products benefiting from reduced rates needs to be re-examined and the zero rating system repealed.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • continuation of the process of harmonising and developing the organisations responsible for assessing compliance and setting up a system for monitoring the market, technical legislation on industrial products;
  • further alignment of the law on competition, particularly as regards State aid;
  • strengthening of the body monitoring State aid;
  • effective application of the law on competition;
  • alignment of the provisions relating to the liberalisation of capital, financial services, audiovisual policy and consumer protection;
  • promotion of business development (particularly SMEs);
  • alignment of telecommunications, consumer protection and the internal energy market with Community legislation.

Assessment (October 1999)

Progress has been made in assessing compliance, monitoring the market and adopting EN standards and technical legislation on industrial products. In the field of State aid, new legislation has been adopted in which the responsibilities of the monitoring authority are clearly defined. The aid programmes have been improved and made more transparent. The coercive measures available to the office in charge of competition can be considered as satisfactory; the powers of the authority responsible for monitoring State aid require further strengthening in order for this body to carry out its duties effectively. Significant progress was made in 1998 and through into 1999 in the liberalisation of capital movements, consumer protection, telecommunications and energy. SMEs have continued to benefit from support measures, through the implementation of a new policy and the granting of adequate budgetary resources.

Assessment (November 2000)

No progress has been made in this area.

Assessment (November 2001)

In the public utilities sector, there was progress in application and appeals procedures. Good progress is being made on aligning the free movement of goods, whilst the process is not yet complete for the recognition of diplomas. Practically all restrictions on the free movement of capital have been removed. The laws on competition and State aid still have to be effectively implemented. Progress is being made on the alignment of customs arrangements and simplified procedures are in force. The administrative and operational capabilities of the customs guard have been strengthened. The computerisation of customs formalities is continuing, but further efforts still need to be made regarding free zones.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 6 December 1999
Official Journal L 335, 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Justice and Home Affairs

Hungary – Justice and Home Affairs

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Justice and Home Affairs

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Justice and Home Affairs

Short-term priorities:

  • implementation of appropriate legislation in respect of refugees, in compliance with the 1951 Geneva Convention;
  • introduction of efficient border controls.

Assessment (October 1999)

In 1998, Hungary had addressed this priority by lifting its geographical reserve to the Geneva Convention. Steps had also been taken to improve border management. The border guard had been transformed into a civilian force and preparatory measures had been taken to develop a nation-wide and modern border management system in line with European Union (EU) standards.

Assessment (November 2000)

Considerable efforts had been made to upgrade border posts, although work still needed to be done to develop a modern, efficient and professional service. Hungary had ratified the Council of Europe Convention on the proceeds from crime. Significant progress had been made in combating organised crime.

Assessment (November 2001)

There is no progress to report in this area.

Assessment (October 2002)

Infrastructure and equipment have been further modernised and upgraded at external borders in line with Schengen requirements and the action plan.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Mediumterm priorities:

  • implementation of an immigration policy and reform of asylum procedures;
  • stepping up the fight against organised crime and corruption (especially money-laundering, drug trafficking and trafficking in human beings);
  • clarification of provisions governing the admission of immigrants, alignment of the visa policy with EU policy, and completion of alignment with international conventions, particularly with a view to application of the Schengen acquis.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary had continued to improve its means of action in areas relating to justice and home affairs, especially through the adoption of new legislation on organised crime, corruption and the admission of immigrants. Institutional reform was under way and the various law enforcement bodies had modernised their equipment.

Assessment (November 2000)

Law enforcement bodies had been modernised, particularly in the area of border management and asylum. Reception facilities for asylum seekers had been improved. Administrative capacity had been strengthened, notably at the national police headquarters, the chief prosecutor’s office and the customs and finance brigade. In July 2000 the Government approved a strategy to combat the drug problem. Alignment of visa legislation continued.

Assessment (November 2001)

Nationals of Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Moldova, Russia and the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) were now subject to a visa requirement in order to enter Hungary. Under the new law on the admission and residence of aliens, a new visa sticker had been introduced. An online system had been set up in fifty-nine diplomatic missions and consulates with a view to facilitating visa application procedures. Hungary had continued its efforts to improve reception conditions for asylum seekers and illegal immigrants. Administrative capacity had also been boosted with a view to combating corruption; this priority had therefore been fulfilled.

Assessment (October 2002)

Hungary has consolidated its legal provisions relating to organised crime and money laundering. As regards measures to combat fraud, corruption and money laundering, a new law entered into force in January 2002.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 06.12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2001)700 final SEC(2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission report COM(2002)700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Hungary – Environment

Hungary – Environment

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Hungary – Environment

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Enlargement > Enlargement 2004 and 2007 > Partnership for the accession of Hungary

Hungary – Environment

Short-term priorities:

  • continue transposition of the framework legislation;
  • development of detailed approximation programmes and implementation strategies related to individual acts;
  • planning and commencement of implementation of these programmes and strategies.

Assessment (October 1999)

These priorities have been partially met.

Progress has been made on bringing Hungary’s legislation into line with the acquis on nature protection, pollution from industrial plants and large combustion plants as well as the control of major accidents. By contrast, progress has been slow on waste, waste management and water and air quality.

Assessment (November 2000)

Alignment with the Directive concerning integrated pollution prevention and control did not take place. A little progress was achieved with alignment in the area of nuclear safety and radiation protection. In June 2000 the law on waste management was adopted. Hungary’s legislation was also aligned with the Directive concerning environment impact assessment, although more efforts are required in order to apply it.

Assessment (November 2001)

Progress has been made on environmental impact assessment. The areas of waste management, handling of batteries and accumulators, and disposal of waste oils and PCBs/PCTs have been aligned with the acquis. The directive on major accident hazards involving dangerous substances has been transposed.

Assessment (October 2002)

The acquis relating to packaging and packaging waste has been transposed.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Medium-term priorities:

  • development of monitoring structures and capacity;
  • continuous planning and implementation of approximation programmes related to individual legal acts;
  • particular emphasis should be given to waste water management, waste management and air pollution;
  • adoption of measures on integrated industrial pollution control;
  • integration of environmental protection requirements and sustainable development into the definition and implementation of national, sectoral policies.

Assessment (October 1999)

Hungary has made little progress in these fields, despite the ambitious target set in its harmonisation programme of full transposition in 2001. It therefore urgently needs to speed up both alignment of its legislation and investment in environmental technology and infrastructure. In this context it is important that the budgetary provisions made in the NPAA are also properly reflected in the annual budget.

Assessment (November 2000)

There was no progress with this priority.

Assessment (November 2001)

The national environment plan has been revised to add integration of the environment into other policies to its priorities. Progress has been made on the protection of wild birds and other protected species. A national programme has been drawn up for implementation of the legislation on water quality. The Community legislation on nitrates pollution from agricultural sources has been fully transposed. A new information system on noise has been set up. Progress has been made with transposition in the fields of chemicals and GMOs, nuclear safety and radiation protection, and air quality.

Assessment (October 2002)

Implementation of the acquis has continued in relation to air quality, and industrial pollution control and risk management. Failure to adopt the National Waste Management Plan has meant no progress in that area. The administrative capacity of the environmental inspectorates has been stepped up, though further efforts are required. The human resources of the competent authorities in the chemicals sector have been increased. The integration of environmental protection requirements into the formulation and implementation of all other sectoral policies has continued.

Assessment (November 2003)

Please refer to the fact sheets on the adoption of the Community acquis.

Following the signing of the Accession Treaty on 16 April 2003, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia acceded to the European Union on 1 May 2004.

References

Decision 99/850/EC of 06 12.1999
Official Journal L 335 of 28.12.1999

Commission opinion COM(97) 2001 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(98) 700 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(1999) 505 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(2000) 705 final
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(2001) 700 final SEC (2001) 1748
Not published in the Official Journal

Report from the Commission COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1404
Not published in the Official Journal

Commission Report COM(2003) 675 final – SEC(2003) 1205
Not published in the Official Journal

Treaty of Accession to the European Union [Official Journal L 236, 23.09.2003]

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.