Category Archives: Education and training: general framework

Education and training play a key role in transforming the European Union (EU) into a world-leading knowledge-based society and economy. Since the adoption of the Lisbon Strategy in 2000, political cooperation in education and training has been strengthened – first by the “Education and Training 2010” work programme, followed-up by the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training “ET 2020”. This cooperation has led to the formulation of common targets and initiatives that encompass all types of education and training and all stages in lifelong learning. They are supported by a number of funding programmes, such as the Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-13 and Erasmus Mundus 2009-13. Furthermore, a number of networks and agencies support action in education and training, namely the Audiovisual, Education and Culture Executive Agency and the European Institute of Innovation and Technology.

Education and Training 2020

Education and Training 2020

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Education and Training 2020

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Education and Training 2020 (ET 2020)

Document or Iniciative

Council Conclusions of 12 May 2009 on a strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training (ET 2020) [Official Journal C 119 of 28.5.2009].

Summary

These conclusions provide for a strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training up until 2020. This framework builds on the achievements of the “Education and Training 2010” (ET 2010) work programme, with a view to responding to the challenges that remain in creating a knowledge-based Europe and making lifelong learning a reality for all.

The main aim of the framework is to support Member States in further developing their educational and training systems. These systems should better provide the means for all citizens to realise their potentials, as well as ensure sustainable economic prosperity and employability. The framework should take into consideration the whole spectrum of education and training systems from a lifelong learning perspective, covering all levels and contexts (including non-formal and informal learning).

The conclusions set out four strategic objectives for the framework:

  • making lifelong learning and mobility a reality – progress is needed in the implementation of lifelong learning strategies, the development of national qualifications frameworks linked to the European Qualifications Framework and more flexible learning pathways. Mobility should be expanded and the European Quality Charter for Mobility should be applied;
  • improving the quality and efficiency of education and training – all citizens need to be able to acquire key competencies and all levels of education and training need to be made more attractive and efficient;
  • promoting equity, social cohesion and active citizenship – education and training should enable all citizens to acquire and develop skills and competencies needed for their employability and foster further learning, active citizenship and intercultural dialogue. Educational disadvantage should be addressed through high quality inclusive and early education;
  • enhancing creativity and innovation, including entrepreneurship, at all levels of education and training – the acquisition of transversal competences by all citizens should be promoted and the functioning of the knowledge triangle (education-research-innovation) should be ensured. Partnerships between enterprises and educational institutions as well as broader learning communities with civil society and other stakeholders should be promoted.

In order to measure progress achieved on these objectives, they are accompanied by indicators and European benchmarks (set out in Annex I of the conclusions).

A set of principles are also provided that should be observed when working towards the objectives mentioned above. This includes the implementation of European cooperation in education and training from a lifelong learning perspective, whereby the open method of coordination (OMC) is used more effectively and synergies are developed between the different sectors involved. European cooperation in education and training should be cross-sectoral as well as transparent, thus involving the related policy areas and all relevant stakeholders. The outcomes from the cooperation should be disseminated and reviewed regularly. Greater compatibility with both the Copenhagen and Bologna processes and stronger dialogue and cooperation with third countries and international organisations should also be aimed at.

With a view of having effective and flexible working methods for European cooperation in education and training, the framework provides for a series of work cycles up to 2020, the first covering the period 2009-11. A number of priority areas are adopted for each cycle on the basis of the above-mentioned strategic objectives. Annex II sets out the priority areas for the first cycle. The cooperation should be carried out through mutual learning initiatives, for which clear mandates, schedules and planned outputs are established. The results of the cooperation are to be widely disseminated among policy makers and stakeholders in order to improve visibility and impact. A joint Council-Commission progress report should be drawn up at the end of each cycle, which will also contribute to the establishment of the priority areas for the next cycle. Together with Member States, the Commission will monitor cooperation in education and training.

Member States should work together using the OMC, with a view to developing European cooperation in education and training based on the above-mentioned strategic objectives, principles and working methods. At the same time, Member States should adopt national measures to attain the strategic objectives as well as to contribute to the achievement of the European benchmarks.

The Commission is invited to support cooperation between Member States, evaluate the progress made on the objectives and the benchmarks, as well as to continue work on benchmarks for mobility, employability and language learning. Furthermore, the Commission, together with the Member States, should examine how the coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks based on the ET 2010 work programme could be harmonised with the ET 2020.

Key competences for a changing world

Key competences for a changing world

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Key competences for a changing world

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Key competences for a changing world

Document or Iniciative

2010 joint progress report of the Council and the Commission on the implementation of the “Education & Training 2010” work programme – ‘Key competences for a changing world’ [Official Journal C 117 of 6.5.2010].

Summary

This fourth joint progress report on the implementation of the ‘Education and training 2010’ work programme notes that policy cooperation at the European level has provided valuable support to countries’ educational reforms. Education and training performance in the European Union (EU) has improved. Nevertheless, most of the quantitative targets set for 2010 have not been attained. Further work is needed to address the remaining challenges.

Key competences

The European framework for key competences for lifelong learning has been used in many EU countries as a reference point for reforming national education and training systems. It has contributed to the move towards a more competence-based teaching and learning approach. Progress has been significant on school curricula and in giving transversal key competences a more prominent part therein. However, additional efforts are needed in the organisation of learning, such as in:

  • putting to use the transversal key competences (digital competence, learning to learn competences, social and civic competences, sense of initiative and entrepreneurship, and cultural awareness);
  • updating the skills and competences of teachers and providing professional development opportunities for school leaders;
  • further developing assessment and evaluation tools to take into account the most important skills and attitudes within the key competences, including the transversal key competences.

A concern for EU countries is pupils’ reading skills performance, which continues to deteriorate. Concerted efforts need to be made to increase literacy levels, especially among boys and migrants. In general, EU countries have adopted personalised approaches to learning for pupils with special needs, as well as programmes for acquiring basic skills at an early stage. Nevertheless, progress is slow and further efforts are needed to combat disadvantage.

EU countries must further develop their vocational education and training (VET) systems to address the full range of key competences more systematically. Work should focus on curricula, teaching and learning methods, and training of VET teachers. The full range of key competences must also be applied to adult learning. While EU countries have taken measures to increase adult participation in education and training, additional efforts should be made to cover all qualifications levels and to improve the competences of adult education teachers.

Lifelong learning strategies

Most EU countries have adopted lifelong learning strategies, which provide for flexible learning pathways. They have also progressed in the development of national qualifications frameworks linked to the European Qualifications Framework (EQF) and covering all levels and types of education and training. Efforts have also been made in the development of lifelong guidance systems for adults. Nevertheless, challenges remain regarding the:

  • implementation of the lifelong learning strategies;
  • further development of the lifelong learning strategies, in collaboration with stakeholders and other relevant policy sectors;
  • coherence and comprehensiveness of the lifelong learning strategies, so that they cover the full life-cycle instead of only specific sectors or target groups;
  • coordination of lifelong guidance systems to take into account the needs of young people.

Vocational education and training (VET)

The Copenhagen process provides for enhanced European cooperation on VET, with a view to improving the attractiveness and quality of VET systems. EU countries address these issues through the application of national quality assurance systems linked to the European Quality Assurance Reference Framework for VET. They also emphasise the professionalisation of VET teachers as well as on making VET more adaptable to the needs of learners and businesses.

However, EU countries must still tackle challenges relating to VET. For example, the relevance of VET with regard to labour market needs must be improved through:

  • closer cooperation between VET and the business world;
  • more work-based training (in addition to school-based training);
  • tools for anticipating future skill needs.

Efforts should also be made to progress faster in finding ways for learners of VET to continue on to higher education.

Higher education

Following an increasing awareness of the importance of enabling non-traditional learners to enter higher education, most EU countries have taken measures to facilitate access for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. At the same time, the diversity of income sources for higher education institutions is increasing. But, there is still the need to increase:

  • public as well as private investment in higher education;
  • access to higher education for those already in the work force for the purpose of continuing professional/personal development;
  • university-business partnerships to strengthen the autonomy of universities, as well as to improve their governance and accountability.

The way forward

While European cooperation in education and training has contributed to reforming national systems, critical challenges still remain. In particular, the European framework for key competences must be applied in full and the openness and relevance of education and training need to be improved. To this end, the Council and the Commission are committed to work together on the basis of the new strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training (ET 2020) and in the context of the overarching “Europe 2020” strategy.

Education and training: general framework

Education and training: general framework

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Education and training: general framework

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Education and training: general framework

Education and training play a key role in transforming the European Union (EU) into a world-leading knowledge-based society and economy. Since the adoption of the Lisbon Strategy in 2000, political cooperation in education and training has been strengthened – first by the “Education and Training 2010” work programme, followed-up by the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training “ET 2020”. This cooperation has led to the formulation of common targets and initiatives that encompass all types of education and training and all stages in lifelong learning. They are supported by a number of funding programmes, such as the Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-13 and Erasmus Mundus 2009-13. Furthermore, a number of networks and agencies support action in education and training, namely the Audiovisual, Education and Culture Executive Agency and the European Institute of Innovation and Technology.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF THE LISBON STRATEGY

  • Key competences for a changing world
  • Delivering lifelong learning for knowledge, creativity and innovation
  • Modernising education and training: a vital contribution to prosperity and social cohesion in Europe
  • Success of Lisbon strategy hinges on urgent reforms

Reference documents

  • Education and Training 2020 (ET 2020)
  • Promoting creativity and innovation through education and training
  • Promoting entrepreneurship in schools and universities
  • A coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks for monitoring the Lisbon objectives
  • European benchmarks in education and training
  • Efficiency and equity in European education and training systems
  • Investing efficiently in education and training
  • Concrete future objectives of education systems
  • Work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of education and training systems in Europe
  • The Lisbon Special European Council (March 2000): Towards a Europe of Innovation and Knowledge
  • The Bologna process: setting up the European Higher Education Area

PROGRAMMES AND INITIATIVES

  • Erasmus Mundus 2009-2013
  • Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-13
  • Youth employment: opportunities
  • Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency
  • European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT)
  • Eurydice
  • Netd@ys Europe
  • Programme to promote bodies active at European level and support specific activities (2004 – 2006)
  • Online learning: eLearning Programme (2004-06)
  • Erasmus Mundus (2004-08)
  • SOCRATES – Phase II
  • Leonardo da Vinci (Phase II) 2000-2006
  • Tempus III (2000-06)

Online learning: eLearning Programme

Online learning: eLearning Programme

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Online learning: eLearning Programme

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Information society > Digital Strategy i2010 Strategy eEurope Action Plan Digital Strategy Programmes

Online learning: eLearning Programme (2004-06)

The eLearning programme was aimed at improving the quality and accessibility of European education and training systems through the effective use of information and communication technologies.

Document or Iniciative

Decision No 2318/2003/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 December 2003 adopting a multiannual programme (2004 to 2006) for the effective integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and training systems in Europe (eLearning Programme).

Summary

Aims

The general objective of the programme was to encourage the efficient use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in European education and training. The aim was to promote quality education and to adapt education and training systems to the needs of a knowledge-based society and the European social cohesion model.

The specific objectives of the programme were to:

  • explore and promote ways and means of using e-learning to strengthen social cohesion and personal development, foster intercultural dialogue and counteract the digital divide;
  • promote and develop the use of e-learning in enabling lifelong learning in Europe;
  • exploit the potential of e-learning for enhancing the European dimension in education;
  • encourage better-structured cooperation in the field of e-learning between the various Community programmes and instruments and the activities organised by Member States;
  • provide mechanisms for improving the quality of products and services and for ensuring their effective dissemination and the exchange of good practice.

Actions

Actions taken under the eLearning programme covered:

  • Promotion of digital literacy. Actions in this area related to the contribution of ICT to learning, particularly for people who could not benefit from conventional education and training, owing to their geographical location, social situation or special needs. The aim was to identify good examples and build synergies between the many national and European projects for these target groups. A number of studies and a high-level expert group were to produce recommendations in this field.
  • Creation of European virtual campuses. Actions in this area aimed to improve integration of the virtual dimension in higher education. The objective was to encourage the development of new organisational models for European virtual universities (virtual campuses) and for exchanging resources and sharing projects (virtual mobility) by building on existing European cooperation arrangements (Erasmus programme, Bologna process) and adding an e-learning dimension to their operational tools (European Credit Transfer System, European Masters, quality assurance, mobility).
  • Development of e-twinning of primary and secondary schools and promotion of teacher training. Launched on 14 January 2005, action in this area aimed to strengthen and further develop school networking, more specifically through a European school twinning project designed to allow all schools in Europe to set up pedagogical partnerships with counterparts elsewhere in Europe, thus promoting language learning and intercultural dialogue and enhancing awareness of the model of a multilingual and multicultural model of European society.
  • Transversal actions and monitoring of e-learning. Actions in this area were dedicated to the promotion of e-learning in Europe by building on the monitoring of the eLearning action plan. The objectives were to disseminate, promote and adopt good practices and the results of the many projects and programmes financed at European level or by Member States, as well as to reinforce cooperation between the various actors involved, in particular by fostering partnerships between the public and private sectors.

Implementation of the programme also included activities to ensure the dissemination of results (provision of information on the internet, showcasing projects and other events, etc.).

Participating countries

The programme was open to the then 25 Member States of the European Community, the EEA-EFTA countries and the candidate countries for accession to the European Union (EU).

Implementation of the programme

The Commission ensured that the eLearning programme was implemented. It established synergies with other Community programmes and actions and encouraged cooperation with international organisations. The Commission worked together with a committee of representatives of Member States to draw up the annual work plan and budget, as well as all other measures necessary for the implementation of the programme.

The Member States, for their part, had the task of identifying appropriate correspondents to cooperate closely with the Commission as regards relevant information about e-learning use.

Budget

The financial framework for the period from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2006 was EUR 44 million. This budget was allocated as follows:

  • 10 % to e-learning for promoting digital literacy;
  • 30 % to European virtual campuses;
  • around 45 % to e-twinning of schools in Europe and the promotion of teacher training;
  • a maximum of 7.5 % to transversal actions and monitoring of the eLearning action plan;
  • a maximum of 7.5 % to technical and administrative assistance.

Funding was granted following invitations to tender and calls for proposals.

Monitoring and evaluation

The Commission ensured regular monitoring of the programme in cooperation with Member States. In order to assess the general impact of the programme and the relevance and effectiveness of the different actions, the eLearning programme was the subject of an external evaluation.

Background

At the Lisbon European Council of 23 and 24 March 2000, the Heads of State and Government set a new objective for the EU: “to become the world’s most competitive and dynamic knowledge economy by 2010”. Since then, Europe has already made substantial progress in introducing ICT, but much remains to be done in order to develop its educational uses. The eLearning programme aimed to plug these gaps by intensifying the efforts already undertaken.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision No 2318/2003/EC

20.1.2004 – 31.12.2006

OJ L 345 of 31.12.2003

Related Acts

Report from the European Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 6 April 2009 – Final Report on the implementation and impact of the second phase (2000-2006) of the Community action programmes in the field of education (Socrates) and vocational training (Leonardo da Vinci) and the multiannual programme (2004-2006) for the effective integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and training systems in Europe (eLearning) [COM(2009) 159 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The eLearning programme, together with Socrates and Leonardo da Vinci, was integrated into the new lifelong learning programme 2007-13. Consequently, the final evaluation of the programme for the period 2004-06 was produced jointly with the other two programmes. This report is based on that external evaluation, including an analysis of reports from participating countries.
The positive impact of the eLearning programme was apparent in:

  • short-term results;
  • the transnational cooperation between institutions;
  • the quality of teaching, learning and curricula;
  • the development of digital literacy.

Overall, the programme provided a significant impact on education and training, contributing to the creation of a European education area. The impact was both quantitative and qualitative, influencing the individual, institutional and policy-making levels. In particular, the eLearning programme provided an added value in tackling socio-economic disparities and in establishing a culture of cooperation among European institutions.
Throughout its duration, the programme funded the following activities:

  • eTwinning projects involving 7 813 schools (23 812 schools registered for participation);
  • 21 projects on virtual campuses;
  • 25 projects on digital literacy;
  • 16 projects on transversal actions.

Decision No 1720/2006/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 November 2006 establishing an action programme in the field of lifelong learning [Official Journal L 327 of 24.11.2006].

The eLearning programme has not been renewed as a sectoral programme, but its objectives have been integrated into the lifelong learning programme (2007-13).
The general aim of this programme is to foster interchange, cooperation and mobility between European education and training systems, so that they become a world quality reference. The development of innovative ICT-based content, services, pedagogies and practices is one of the key elements of the programme.


Another Normative about Online learning: eLearning Programme

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Online learning: eLearning Programme (2004-06)

The eLearning programme was aimed at improving the quality and accessibility of European education and training systems through the effective use of information and communication technologies.

Document or Iniciative

Decision No 2318/2003/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 December 2003 adopting a multiannual programme (2004 to 2006) for the effective integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and training systems in Europe (eLearning Programme).

Summary

Aims

The general objective of the programme was to encourage the efficient use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in European education and training. The aim was to promote quality education and to adapt education and training systems to the needs of a knowledge-based society and the European social cohesion model.

The specific objectives of the programme were to:

  • explore and promote ways and means of using e-learning to strengthen social cohesion and personal development, foster intercultural dialogue and counteract the digital divide;
  • promote and develop the use of e-learning in enabling lifelong learning in Europe;
  • exploit the potential of e-learning for enhancing the European dimension in education;
  • encourage better-structured cooperation in the field of e-learning between the various Community programmes and instruments and the activities organised by Member States;
  • provide mechanisms for improving the quality of products and services and for ensuring their effective dissemination and the exchange of good practice.

Actions

Actions taken under the eLearning programme covered:

  • Promotion of digital literacy. Actions in this area related to the contribution of ICT to learning, particularly for people who could not benefit from conventional education and training, owing to their geographical location, social situation or special needs. The aim was to identify good examples and build synergies between the many national and European projects for these target groups. A number of studies and a high-level expert group were to produce recommendations in this field.
  • Creation of European virtual campuses. Actions in this area aimed to improve integration of the virtual dimension in higher education. The objective was to encourage the development of new organisational models for European virtual universities (virtual campuses) and for exchanging resources and sharing projects (virtual mobility) by building on existing European cooperation arrangements (Erasmus programme, Bologna process) and adding an e-learning dimension to their operational tools (European Credit Transfer System, European Masters, quality assurance, mobility).
  • Development of e-twinning of primary and secondary schools and promotion of teacher training. Launched on 14 January 2005, action in this area aimed to strengthen and further develop school networking, more specifically through a European school twinning project designed to allow all schools in Europe to set up pedagogical partnerships with counterparts elsewhere in Europe, thus promoting language learning and intercultural dialogue and enhancing awareness of the model of a multilingual and multicultural model of European society.
  • Transversal actions and monitoring of e-learning. Actions in this area were dedicated to the promotion of e-learning in Europe by building on the monitoring of the eLearning action plan. The objectives were to disseminate, promote and adopt good practices and the results of the many projects and programmes financed at European level or by Member States, as well as to reinforce cooperation between the various actors involved, in particular by fostering partnerships between the public and private sectors.

Implementation of the programme also included activities to ensure the dissemination of results (provision of information on the internet, showcasing projects and other events, etc.).

Participating countries

The programme was open to the then 25 Member States of the European Community, the EEA-EFTA countries and the candidate countries for accession to the European Union (EU).

Implementation of the programme

The Commission ensured that the eLearning programme was implemented. It established synergies with other Community programmes and actions and encouraged cooperation with international organisations. The Commission worked together with a committee of representatives of Member States to draw up the annual work plan and budget, as well as all other measures necessary for the implementation of the programme.

The Member States, for their part, had the task of identifying appropriate correspondents to cooperate closely with the Commission as regards relevant information about e-learning use.

Budget

The financial framework for the period from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2006 was EUR 44 million. This budget was allocated as follows:

  • 10 % to e-learning for promoting digital literacy;
  • 30 % to European virtual campuses;
  • around 45 % to e-twinning of schools in Europe and the promotion of teacher training;
  • a maximum of 7.5 % to transversal actions and monitoring of the eLearning action plan;
  • a maximum of 7.5 % to technical and administrative assistance.

Funding was granted following invitations to tender and calls for proposals.

Monitoring and evaluation

The Commission ensured regular monitoring of the programme in cooperation with Member States. In order to assess the general impact of the programme and the relevance and effectiveness of the different actions, the eLearning programme was the subject of an external evaluation.

Background

At the Lisbon European Council of 23 and 24 March 2000, the Heads of State and Government set a new objective for the EU: “to become the world’s most competitive and dynamic knowledge economy by 2010”. Since then, Europe has already made substantial progress in introducing ICT, but much remains to be done in order to develop its educational uses. The eLearning programme aimed to plug these gaps by intensifying the efforts already undertaken.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Decision No 2318/2003/EC

20.1.2004 – 31.12.2006

OJ L 345 of 31.12.2003

Related Acts

Report from the European Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 6 April 2009 – Final Report on the implementation and impact of the second phase (2000-2006) of the Community action programmes in the field of education (Socrates) and vocational training (Leonardo da Vinci) and the multiannual programme (2004-2006) for the effective integration of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education and training systems in Europe (eLearning) [COM(2009) 159 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The eLearning programme, together with Socrates and Leonardo da Vinci, was integrated into the new lifelong learning programme 2007-13. Consequently, the final evaluation of the programme for the period 2004-06 was produced jointly with the other two programmes. This report is based on that external evaluation, including an analysis of reports from participating countries.
The positive impact of the eLearning programme was apparent in:

  • short-term results;
  • the transnational cooperation between institutions;
  • the quality of teaching, learning and curricula;
  • the development of digital literacy.

Overall, the programme provided a significant impact on education and training, contributing to the creation of a European education area. The impact was both quantitative and qualitative, influencing the individual, institutional and policy-making levels. In particular, the eLearning programme provided an added value in tackling socio-economic disparities and in establishing a culture of cooperation among European institutions.
Throughout its duration, the programme funded the following activities:

  • eTwinning projects involving 7 813 schools (23 812 schools registered for participation);
  • 21 projects on virtual campuses;
  • 25 projects on digital literacy;
  • 16 projects on transversal actions.

Decision No 1720/2006/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 15 November 2006 establishing an action programme in the field of lifelong learning [Official Journal L 327 of 24.11.2006].

The eLearning programme has not been renewed as a sectoral programme, but its objectives have been integrated into the lifelong learning programme (2007-13).
The general aim of this programme is to foster interchange, cooperation and mobility between European education and training systems, so that they become a world quality reference. The development of innovative ICT-based content, services, pedagogies and practices is one of the key elements of the programme.

Work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of education and training systems in Europe

Work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of education and training systems in Europe

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of education and training systems in Europe

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of education and training systems in Europe

Document or Iniciative

Detailed work programme on the follow-up of the objectives of education and training systems in Europe [Official Journal C 142/01 of 14.06.2002].

Summary

At the Barcelona European Council meeting, the “Education” Council and the Commission jointly proposed the following work programme, together with a detailed timetable for working towards the concrete future objectives of education and training systems, with particular reference to key issues:

Improving the quality of education and training systems

Strategic and associated objectives

Key issues

Indicators for measuring progress

Improving education and training for teachers and trainers
Starting period: during 2002

– Identifying the skills that teachers and trainers should have, given their changing roles in the knowledge society;
– Creating the conditions which adequately support teachers and trainers as they tackle the challenges of the knowledge society, from the point of view of lifelong learning;
– Ensuring that a sufficient number of people enter the teaching profession, across all subjects and at all levels, as well as providing for the long-term needs of the profession by making it more attractive;
– Attracting recruits to teaching and training who have professional experience in other fields.

– Shortage/surplus of qualified teachers and trainers on the labour market,
– progression in number of applicants for training programmes (teachers and trainers),
– percentage of teachers and trainers who follow continuous professional training.

Developing the skills needed for a knowledge society
Starting period: second half of 2001

– Identifying new basic skills and ways of integrating them into the curricula, alongside the traditional basic skills;
– Making attainment of basic skills genuinely available to everyone, including those who are less advantaged or have special needs, school drop-outs and adult learners;
– Promoting official validation of basic skills, in order to facilitate ongoing education and training, as well as employability.

– People completing secondary education,
– continuous training of teachers,
– literacy and numeracy “learning to learn” attainment levels,
– percentage of adults failing to complete upper secondary education who have participated in any form of education or training, by age group.

Ensuring access to ICT for everyone
Starting period: second half of 2001

– Providing adequate equipment and educational software;
– Encouraging the best use of teaching and learning techniques based on ICT (information and communication technologies).

– Percentage of teachers that have been trained in ICT use in schools,
– percentage of pupils and students using ICT in their studies,
– percentage of learning sessions in teaching and training institutions during which ICT are used.

Increasing recruitment to scientific and technical studies
Starting period: second half of 2001

– Boosting interest in mathematics, science and technology from an early age;
– Motivating more young people to choose studies and careers in the fields of mathematics, science and technology;
– Improving the gender balance in these subjects;
– Securing a sufficient number of qualified teachers.

– Increase in number of entries into mathematics, science and technology courses (upper secondary advanced levels and tertiary levels, by gender),
– increase in number of graduates in mathematics, science and technology, by gender,
– increase in number of scientists and engineers in society, by gender,
– increase in number of qualified teachers in the fields of mathematics, science and technology (secondary level).

Making the best use of resources
Starting period: during 2002

– Increasing investment in human resources while ensuring an equitable and effective distribution of available means in order to facilitate general access to, and enhance the quality of, education and training;
– Supporting the development of compatible quality assurance systems respecting diversity across Europe;
– Developing the potential of public-private partnerships.

– Increase in per capita investment in human resources (structural indicator).

Facilitating the access of all to education and training

Strategic and associated objectives

Key issues

Indicators for measuring progress

Creating an environment conducive to learning
Starting period: between the second half of 2002 and the end of 2003

– Broadening access to lifelong learning by providing information, advice and guidance on the full range of education and training opportunities available;
– Organising education and training in a way that allows adults to effectively participate and combine this participation with other activities and responsibilities;
– Ensuring that education and training are accessible to all;
– Promoting flexible learning paths for all;
– Promoting networks of education and training institutions at various levels in the context of lifelong learning.

– Percentage of the population aged between 25 and 64 participating in education and training (structural indicator).

Making learning more attractive
Starting period: between the second half of 2002 and the end of 2003

– Encouraging young people to remain in education or training after the end of compulsory schooling, and motivating and enabling adults to participate in learning throughout life;
– Developing methods for the official validation of non-formal learning experiences;
– Finding ways of making learning more attractive, both within the formal education and training systems and outside them;
– Fostering a culture of learning.

– Percentage of working time spent by employees on training, by age group,
– participation in higher education,
– proportion of the population aged 18-24 with only lower secondary education achievement and not pursuing education or training (structural indicator).

Supporting active citizenship, equal opportunities and social cohesion
Starting period: during 2002

– Ensuring that the learning of democratic values and democratic participation in schools is effectively promoted in order to prepare people for active citizenship;
– Fully integrating the equal opportunities dimension into the objectives and functioning of education and training;
– Ensuring fair access to the acquisition of skills.

– Proportion of the population aged 18-24 with only lower secondary education achievement and not pursuing education or training (structural indicator).

Opening up education and training systems to the wider world

Strategic and associated objectives

Key issues

Indicators for measuring progress

Strengthening links with the world of work, research and society as a whole
Starting period: between the second half of 2002 and the end of 2003

– Promoting close cooperation between education and training systems and society generally;
– Establishing partnerships between all types of education and training institutions, businesses and research centres, for their mutual benefit;
– Promoting the role of stakeholders in the development of training, including initial training, and learning at the workplace.

– Percentage of students and persons in initial training who benefit from work-linked placements.

Developing the spirit of enterprise
Starting period: between the second half of 2002 and the end of 2003

– Promoting a sense of initiative and creativity throughout the education and training system in order to develop the spirit of enterprise (“entrepreneurship”);
– Facilitating the acquisition of skills needed to set up and run a business.

– Proportion of self-employed workers in various sectors of the knowledge economy (particularly the 25-35 age group),
– percentage of education and training institutions providing advice and guidance for setting up businesses.

Improving foreign language learning
Starting period: between the second half of 2002 and the end of 2003

– Encouraging everyone to learn two or, where appropriate, more languages in addition to their mother tongue, and increasing awareness of the importance of foreign language learning at all ages;
– Encouraging schools and training institutions to use effective teaching and training methods, and motivating continuation of language learning at a later stage of life.

– Percentage of pupils and students attaining a certain level of proficiency in two foreign languages,
– percentage of language teachers having participated in initial training or in-service training courses with a mobility element providing direct contact with the language/culture they teach.

Increasing mobility and exchanges
Starting period: during 2002

– Providing the widest possible access to mobility for individuals and education and training organisations, including those serving a less privileged public, and reducing the remaining obstacles to mobility;
– Monitoring the volume, destinations, participation rates and qualitative aspects of mobility flows across Europe;
– Facilitating the validation and recognition of skills acquired in the context of mobility;
– Promoting the presence and recognition of European education and training in the world as well as their attractiveness to students, academics and researchers from other world regions.

– Proportion of students and trainees from one country carrying out part of their studies in another EU or third country,
– proportion of teachers, researchers and academics from other EU countries employed at different levels of the education system,
– number and distribution of EU and non-EU students and trainees participating in an education or training programme.

Strengthening European cooperation
Starting period: during 2002

– Enhancing the effectiveness and timeliness of recognition procedures for the purposes of further study, training or employment throughout Europe;
– Promoting cooperation between responsible organisations and authorities from the point of view of more compatibility in quality assurance and validation;
– Promoting transparency of information on education and training opportunities and structures with a view to the creation of an open European area for education;
– Promoting the European dimension of teaching and training.

– Proportion of undergraduate and postgraduate students and researchers continuing their studies in another EU or third country,
– percentage of graduates obtaining joint degrees in Europe,
– percentage of students and trainees within ECTS or Europass and/or obtaining a Diploma/Certificate Supplement.

In keeping with the open method of coordination, this work programme also identifies the main instruments to be used for measuring progress and comparing results across Europe, at both European and international levels.

Background

According to the timetable, the results are to be evaluated in mid-2003, followed by the submission of an interim report on the implementation of the work programme to the spring 2004 European Council, with the final report coming in 2010.

Modernising education and training: a vital contribution to prosperity and social cohesion in Europe

Modernising education and training: a vital contribution to prosperity and social cohesion in Europe

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Modernising education and training: a vital contribution to prosperity and social cohesion in Europe

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Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Modernising education and training: a vital contribution to prosperity and social cohesion in Europe

Last updated: 11.04.2008

A coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks for monitoring the Lisbon objectives

A coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks for monitoring the Lisbon objectives

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about A coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks for monitoring the Lisbon objectives

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

A coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks for monitoring the Lisbon objectives

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission of 21 February 2007 – “A coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks for monitoring progress towards the Lisbon objectives in education and training” [COM(2007) 61 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

Indicators and benchmarks are needed to monitor the progress that is essential to the Lisbon process. The current framework is based on the Education and Training 2010 programme and consists of a set of 20 essential indicators (the “core indicators”), which are supported by context indicators, and five benchmarks.

This framework facilitates the sharing of experiences and best practice and makes it possible to:

  • provide statistical underpinning for key policy messages;
  • analyse progress towards the Lisbon objectives, at both European Union (EU) and national level;
  • identify examples of good performance that can be disseminated in EU countries;
  • compare EU performance with that of non-EU countries, such as the USA and Japan.

FRAMEWORK OF INDICATORS AND BENCHMARKS

The framework of indicators and benchmarks consists of core indicators, which are of a general nature, and context indicators, which allow a greater degree of precision.

The indicators and benchmarks are centred around eight key policy domains identified in the Education and Training 2010 strategy, namely:

  • making education and training fairer;
  • promoting efficiency in education and training;
  • making lifelong learning a reality;
  • key skills for young people;
  • modernising school education;
  • modernising vocational education and training (the Copenhagen process);
  • modernising higher education (the Bologna process);
  • employability.

Making education and training fairer

European education and training systems must be fair. Fairness is assessed by looking at the extent to which individuals take advantage of education and training in terms of opportunities, access, treatment and outcomes. Certain key themes, such as the promotion of gender equality and the integration of ethnic minorities and disabled persons, need to be monitored.

In order to ensure effective participation in lifelong learning, the proportion of early school-leavers must be reduced. The Council has therefore set a benchmark of limiting to 10% the proportion of early school-leavers.

Progress in this area will be assessed on the basis of the following core indicators:

  • participation in pre-school education;
  • special needs education;
  • early school-leavers.

The indicator on the stratification of education and training systems will make it possible to assess the impact of the structure of education and training systems and differences between educational establishments.

Promoting efficiency in education and training

It has been shown that improving efficiency is not necessarily detrimental to the fairness of education systems. Efficiency and fairness can go hand in hand.

The efficiency of European education and training systems is mainly a matter of making the best possible use of resources. Private and public investment must be supported, as must investment in higher education. Indeed, the latter receives less funding than in some non-EU countries.

Efficiency will be assessed in the light of investment in education and training.

Making lifelong learning a reality

Lifelong learning is crucial for competitiveness, employability, economic prosperity, social inclusion, active citizenship and the personal fulfilment of people living and working in the knowledge-based economy.

In order to have a career and participate fully in lifelong learning, it is essential to complete upper secondary education. In view of this, the Council has adopted two benchmarks, namely that by 2010, 85% of young people should complete upper secondary education and that by 2010, 12.5% of the adult population should participate in lifelong learning.

The core indicators for monitoring progress in this area are:

  • participation of adults in lifelong learning;
  • adults’ skills.

What is more, the indicator on upper secondary completion rates will make it possible to assess the degree to which young people are ready to participate in lifelong learning.

Key skills for young people

Acquiring basic skills is an essential prerequisite for working in a knowledge-based society. This is why the Council has set a benchmark aimed at reducing by at least 20% the number of low-achieving 15-year-olds in reading as compared to the 2000 level.

The core indicators allowing an overall assessment of basic skills are based on the following key skills:

  • literacy in reading, mathematics and science;
  • language skills;
  • ICT (information and communication technologies) skills;
  • civic skills;
  • learning to learn.

Modernising school education

The quality of school education depends on improving the initial training of teachers and the participation of all teachers in continuing professional development. The Council has also deemed that tools such as school self-evaluation are essential. Accordingly, training in the management and use of these tools must be promoted.

Progress in this area will be monitored using the following core indicators:

  • early school-leavers;
  • school management;
  • schools as multi-purpose local learning centres;
  • professional development of teachers and trainers.

Modernising vocational education and training (VET)

In line with the Copenhagen process, the image and appeal of vocational training for employers must be improved, levels of participation in VET must be increased and quality and flexibility in initial vocational education and training must be encouraged.

Progress will be assessed using the core indicator on upper secondary completion rates among young people, with particular attention being given to vocational streams.

The indicator on the stratification of education and training systems measures the degree to which initial vocational education and training is available in the structure of the education and training system.

Furthermore, the context indicator on participation in continuing vocational education and training will allow an assessment of the role of businesses in the participation of their employees in continuing vocational training and its financing.

Modernising higher education

Modernising higher education and increasing funding to university research will contribute to the EU’s objective of becoming a competitive knowledge-based economy. Moreover, the Bologna process has the aim of creating, by 2010, a European Higher Education Area with a common degree structure so as to encourage mobility among students and workers.

The benchmarks for assessing the modernisation of higher education are that of devoting at least 2% of GDP (including both public and private funding) by 2015 to modernising higher education and that of increasing by 15% the number of graduates in mathematics, science and technology by 2010.

Progress will be measured using the following three core indicators:

  • higher education graduates;
  • transnational mobility of students in higher education;
  • investment in education and training.

Employability

In order to meet the challenge of achieving a higher level of employment, the Council has set objectives for overall employment rates, employment rates for older workers and employment rates for women.

People’s employability and capacity to adapt throughout their life depend on their level of education and their key skills.

The indicators used for employability are:

  • educational attainment of the population;
  • adults’ skills;
  • results produced by education and training.

DATA SOURCES SUPPORTING THE COHERENT FRAMEWORK

The framework of indicators and benchmarks is based on data that mainly come from the European Statistical System (ESS).

Data provided by the ESS

Several different sources are used within the ESS to produce data on education and training and establish indicators. These can be divided into two groups.

The first group encompasses the annual UNESCO/OECD/Eurostat (UOE) data collection on formal education systems in EU countries, the five-yearly Continuing Vocational Training Survey (CVTS), which collects information on training at enterprise level and the five-yearly Adult Education Survey (AES), which provides information on adult learning habits.

The second group includes general sources of information such as the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and the EU Survey on Income and Living Conditions (SILC). There are also other specific sources (surveys on the use of ICT in households and companies).

Acquiring internationally comparable data is a matter of interest for individual countries. Various countries are thus making their statistical infrastructures better equipped to produce information on the schools and students whose work the EU is tracking.

Data produced outside the ESS

The ESS cannot provide the full statistical infrastructure required for the framework of indicators and benchmarks. Eurydice and Cedefop, in cooperation with Eurostat, are responsible for the data and context indicators that support this framework.

Furthermore, the Commission may decide to put forward its own procedures for creating data-collection tools, such as in the field of language knowledge. It has also prepared a recommendation on the creation of a survey tool in the area of “learning to learn”, and a transnational pilot survey is planned for 2007.

The Commission also cooperates with international organisations such as the OECD, which produce their own indicators, and with EU countries.

BACKGROUND

In 2002, the Heads of State and Government agreed to make European education and training systems a world quality reference by 2010. As part of the Lisbon strategy, common objectives for improving education and training systems were adopted by the Ministers of Education. The Education and Training 2010 work programme was drawn up so as to achieve these objectives.

The coherent framework of indicators and benchmarks covered by this communication will make it possible to assess the progress made. It replaces the framework that was in place for the 2004-06 period, in comparison with which it is more streamlined. Indeed, the 2004-06 framework was made up of 29 indicators and five benchmarks intended to measure progress in the 13 objectives then in place.

Related Acts

Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 June 2009 on the establishment of a European Quality Assurance Reference Framework for Vocational Education and Training [Official Journal C 155 of 8.7.2009].

Regulation (EC) No 452/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 23 April 2008 concerning the production and development of statistics on education and lifelong learning [Official Journal L 145 of 4.6.2008].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 3 August 2007 – “Improving the quality of teacher education” [COM(2007) 392 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Recommendation 2006/962/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2006 on key competences for lifelong learning [Official Journal L 394 of 30.12.2006].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 8 September 2006 – “Efficiency and equity in European education and training systems” [COM(2006) 481 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 20 October 2005 – “European values in the globalised world – Contribution of the Commission to the October Meeting of Heads of State and Government” [COM(2005) 525 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions of 12 October 2005 – “More Research and Innovation – Investing for Growth and Employment: A Common Approach” [COM(2005) 488 final – Official Journal C 49 of 28.2.2006].

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council of 1 August 2005 – “The European Indicator of Language Competence” [COM(2005) 356 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament and to the Council of 25 May 2005 on the independence, integrity and accountability of the national and Community statistical authorities [COM(2005) 217 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission of 20 April 2005 – “Mobilising the brainpower of Europe: enabling universities to make their full contribution to the Lisbon Strategy” [COM(2005) 152 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission of 10 January 2003 – “Investing efficiently in education and training: an imperative for Europe” [COM(2002) 779 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission of 20 November 2002 – “European benchmarks in education and training: follow-up to the Lisbon European Council” [COM(2002) 629 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Council Resolution of 27 June 2002 on lifelong learning [Official Journal C 163 of 9.7.2002].

Recommendation of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 February 2001 on European cooperation in quality evaluation in school education [Official Journal L 60 of 1.3.2001].

 

Promoting creativity and innovation through education and training

Promoting creativity and innovation through education and training

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Promoting creativity and innovation through education and training

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Promoting creativity and innovation through education and training

Document or Iniciative

Conclusions of the Council and of the Representatives of the Governments of the Member States, meeting within the Council of 22 May 2008 on promoting creativity and innovation through education and training [Official Journal C 141 of 7.6.2008].

Summary

The ‘Education and Training 2010’ work programme promotes the common European objectives of quality, access and openness to the wider world. Since creativity and innovation are also relevant for dealing with global challenges, they should be incorporated into the future framework of European cooperation in the education field. Education and training can develop creative and innovative capacities, which in turn contribute to sustainable economic and social development in Europe.

The 2006 Recommendation on key competences for lifelong learning lists eight competences that contain skills relevant for creativity and innovation. Among them, the abilities to see change as an opportunity, to be open to new ideas and to respect others’ values are particularly important. Inclusive education policies that promote tolerance and understanding should be designed in order to turn multiculturalism into an asset for creativity, innovation and growth.

New research is needed to identify, measure and document learning outcomes, especially on soft skills like creative and innovative capacities. In addition, to promote these capacities, substantive data need to be presented to policy-makers. The contribution of the EU in this process must also be considered.

Consequently, the Member States are called upon to:

  • promote the incorporation of creativity and innovation at all levels of education and training;
  • support the professional development of teachers as mediators of creativity and innovation;
  • encourage the development of a learning culture where networks and partnerships between educational institutions and related bodies are forged with the corporate sector.

It is suggested that both the Member States and the Commission:

  • consider complementing the objectives of European cooperation in education with the promotion of creative and innovative capacity, and supporting the implementation of the 2006 Recommendation on key competencies for lifelong learning;
  • develop environments that favour creativity and innovation by promoting multi-level cooperation, intercultural dialogue and cultural production;
  • promote creativity and innovation in collaboration with appropriate international organisations, such as the Council of Europe, Unesco and the OECD;
  • promote the development, exchange and dissemination of good practice on evidence-based education policies relating to creative and innovative skills;
  • promote creativity and innovation at all stages of lifelong learning through the EU programmes and instruments.

Finally, the Commission is called upon to:

  • support relevant research, analysis and exchange of data on the promotion of creative and innovative capacity through education and training;
  • incorporate the development of creative and innovative capacity through education and training into the European education cooperation beyond 2010 and the broad-based European innovation policy.

Background

These conclusions build upon the outcomes of the Conference on Promoting Innovation and Creativity: Schools’ Response to the Challenges of Future Societies of 9-10 April 2008 and on the political background set out in the Annex to these conclusions. The latter includes notably the Council conclusions of 4 December 2006 on a Broad-based Innovation Strategy: Strategic Priorities for Innovation at EU level, which were based on the Commission Communication COM(2006) 502 of 13 September 2006 on a European innovation strategy. These perceive education as one of the pre-conditions for innovation, indicating the importance of supporting the development of talent and creativity from an early age through education.

Delivering lifelong learning for knowledge, creativity and innovation

Delivering lifelong learning for knowledge, creativity and innovation

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Delivering lifelong learning for knowledge, creativity and innovation

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Delivering lifelong learning for knowledge, creativity and innovation

Document or Iniciative

2008 joint progress report of the Council and the Commission on the implementation of the ‘Education and Training 2010’ work programme – ‘Delivering lifelong learning for knowledge, creativity and innovation’ [Official Journal C 86 of 5.4.2008].

Summary

This third joint progress report on the implementation of the ‘Education and training 2010’ work programme attests that significant progress has been achieved in many areas. However, further efforts still need to be made, especially with regard to skill levels, lifelong learning strategies and the education, research and innovation “knowledge triangle”.

Overall, progress throughout Europe has not been uniform nor have reforms been realised fast enough. Yet, most of the Member States have either already put into effect reforms, or are currently doing so, with regard to the following:

  • development of lifelong learning strategies that define policy priorities and the relationship between different sectors, covering either all aspects of education and training or focusing only on specific systems or stages;
  • development of qualifications frameworks and validation of non-formal and informal learning; however, it is now essential that Member States begin the application of these tools;
  • pre-primary education, for which a number of Member States have run successful pilot projects on teaching content, staff training, quality assessment and financing that should now be implemented on a broad scale;
  • modernisation of higher education, especially in terms of increasing the autonomy of universities;
  • mainstreaming education and training at the European Union (EU) policy level, with progress achieved in linking operational programmes to the ‘Education and training 2010’ work programme and in the development of European reference tools, such as the European Qualifications Framework or the key competences.

The areas where progress has been insufficient include the:

  • implementation of lifelong learning strategies;
  • reduction in the number of early school leavers, increase in the number of young people completing at least upper secondary education and the acquisition of key competences;
  • education, continuous training and professional development of teachers;
  • attainment of excellence in terms of education, research and knowledge transfer, and increase of both public and private investment in higher education;
  • participation of adults in lifelong learning, in particular of older workers and the low skilled;
  • improvement of the attractiveness, quality and relevance of vocational education and training (VET), including its proper integration into the rest of the education system;
  • increase in transnational mobility schemes provided at national level, with a focus on facilitating mobility also in VET.

Future work should concentrate, in particular, on implementing lifelong learning strategies, emphasising the role of education in the knowledge triangle and improving governance. The Member States’ lifelong learning strategies are not necessarily coherent or comprehensive. The strategies should be better linked to policy measures, the resources should be targeted more effectively and more efforts should be made to develop learning partnerships between national institutions and stakeholders. Hence, it is essential that:

  • knowledge about the economic and social impact of education and training policies be improved;
  • efforts to secure sustainable funding be strengthened;
  • skills levels be raised, especially through the early acquisition of key competences and VET;
  • socio-economic disadvantage be addressed, with priority placed on equal access, participation, treatment and outcomes;
  • migrants be considered in education and training policies and systems;
  • professional preparation and continuing development be provided for teachers.

As one of the fundamental elements of the knowledge triangle, education contributes to boosting growth and jobs. In addition to higher education, schools and VET have a significant role in facilitating innovation. Thus, it is of utmost importance that efforts are stepped up to enable partnerships between educational institutions and businesses and that excellence and key competences are developed throughout the different levels of education and training.

To further improve governance, it is imperative to give due consideration, both at the national and European levels, to the:

  • setting of priorities in education and training policy with regard to lifelong learning;
  • interlinking of relevant policies (e.g. innovation, research, employment);
  • integration of developments in higher education, VET and adult learning within the ‘Education and Training 2010’ work programme;
  • link between the Lisbon integrated guidelines and the ‘Education and training 2010’ work programme;
  • monitoring of and informing on national policy developments;
  • role of the civil society;
  • development of benchmarks and indicators;
  • use of Community funds and programmes.

While Member States have achieved progress in reforming certain strands of their education systems, persistent as well as certain new challenges still need to be addressed. Efforts to overcome these challenges should be stepped up. It is therefore essential that work on an updated strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training for post-2010 is begun now and that this is closely associated with the future development of the Lisbon process.

Netd@ys Europe

Netd@ys Europe

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Netd@ys Europe

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These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Education and training: general framework

Netd@ys Europe

Background

Netd@ys Europe represents many different projects presented during ‘Netd@ys Week’, which were held each year during November from 1997 to 2005.
First held in 1997, as part of the European Commission action plan ‘Learning in the information society’ (1996-1998), has become the world’s largest awareness-raising campaign for the new media, in particular the Internet, as teaching, learning and discovery tools and resources in the areas of education, in the broad sense of the word, and culture.
A fundamental principle is that priority is always given to the educational content of projects, rather than technology, and publicising the potential and value of the new media in this area.

Themes of Netd@ys Europe 2000 projects

While being fully aware that the changing role of teachers, trainers and youth workers and improving the quality of life, in particular for disadvantaged people or those living in isolated areas, are thematic priorities of the Netd@ys philosophy, each year the European Commission defines the specific reference themes from which the projects should draw inspiration.

In the spirit of the Netd@ys initiative, the thematic categories may be the following:

  • Citizenship: encouraging people to participate actively in society, including the implementation of democracy in Europe, and providing innovative educational and cultural approaches to developing respect for diversity and a spirit of tolerance in society;
  • European cultural diversity and identity: fostering a better understanding of Europe’s cultural heritage by using new technologies;
  • Equality of opportunities: providing those with special needs, the elderly, excluded and isolated with access to a range of cultural and educational information in order to improve the quality of their lives and encourage them to use new technologies;
  • Education and training for improving digital literacy: promoting the development, exchange and dissemination of innovative approaches or good practices which will enable more people to use the new media as tools for improving teaching, learning and discovery;
  • Outside Europe: continuing to extend the initiative to the wider world, focusing on the countries of central and eastern Europe and the active participation of Australia, Brazil, Canada and Israel.

Netd@ys Europe has gradually been extended to the entire world, opening up to countries such as Australia, Brazil, Canada, Israel and Switzerland.

Eligibility criteria: Organisations

Netd@ys Europe is open to any organisation sympathetic to the philosophy and objectives of the initiative (e.g. educational establishments, training centres, cultural institutions, local authorities, youth associations, etc.).
7. The initiative also permits and promotes partnerships between organisations in the areas of education, training and culture and private-sector companies, non-profit-making associations, etc.

While Netd@ys is open to people of all ages, it focuses chiefly on young people aged between 15 and 25.

Eligibility criteria: Projects

The projects should demonstrate examples of using online technology in learning, teaching and discovery. They can take place at any time of the year, but a special activity must be arranged for the Netd@ys week, which will act as a showcase for all the projects.

The projects can be local, regional or national. Projects which comply with all the Netd@ys criteria may apply for the Netd@ys label. The Netd@ys label is not only a quality label – it also makes it possible for a project to be widely known: all the labelled projects are mentioned on the Netd@ys site.

Community subsidies

Any project receiving a Community subsidy will have to satisfy strict criteria concerning its content and management. It must also have a European dimension and be carried out in cooperation with a network of partners from at least three EU countries and the European Economic Area (EEA) and the EU candidate countries (Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Poland, the Czech Republic, Romania, Slovenia and Slovakia). The Community subsidy may not exceed 50% of the total cost of the project and can only be used for certain activities.

Projects without a Community subsidy

The opportunity to participate in Netd@ys does not depend on financial support from the Commission. Proposals for projects without a Community subsidy can be submitted at any time up to the first day of the Netd@ys week.

All projects which comply with the general Netd@ys principles are be registered with the European Commission as official ‘Netd@ys’, a recognised quality mark that helps promote projects and contributes to their success. Participating organisations can register their project on the Netd@ys site and look for partners working on the same topic in other countries.

Role of the European Commission

In addition to providing financial support, the Commission provides encouragement, organisation and general coordination. It provides a general framework for raising awareness of the promotional activities at European level and facilitates coordination between projects and partners.

Role of correspondents in the participating countries

Since its launch, Netd@ys Europe has enjoyed the support and commitment of the national education ministries. The ministers of the Member States of the European Union, the countries of the European Economic Area (EEA), and the EU candidate countries appoint the national Netd@ys correspondents, whose role is to promote, organise and coordinate the projects at national level, link them up with projects in other countries and help them to obtain sponsorship from potential private-sector partners.