Category Archives: Agriculture: Enlargement

The recent enlargements of the European Union have had the effect of increasing the significance of agriculture and have resulted in new economic and social challenges for the common agricultural policy (CAP). The new Member States have huge agricultural potential in terms of human resources and providing further farmland. However, this potential has yet to be fully realised. There is a considerable socioeconomic divide between the old and the new Member States in the agricultural sector. Through its intervention, the EU aims to prepare candidate countries for implementing the CAP, specifically by adapting their infrastructure and reducing the disparities between Member States upon their accession.

Agriculture: enlargement

Agriculture: enlargement

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Agriculture: enlargement

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Agriculture: enlargement

The recent enlargements of the European Union have had the effect of increasing the significance of agriculture and have resulted in new economic and social challenges for the common agricultural policy (CAP). The new Member States have huge agricultural potential in terms of human resources and providing further farmland. However, this potential has yet to be fully realised. There is a considerable socioeconomic divide between the old and the new Member States in the agricultural sector. Through its intervention, the EU aims to prepare candidate countries for implementing the CAP, specifically by adapting their infrastructure and reducing the disparities between Member States upon their accession.

SYSTEM OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT

  • Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA)
  • Pre-accession agricultural instrument (SAPARD)

ONGOING ENLARGEMENT

  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • Croatia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • Turkey – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • Iceland – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

JANUARY 2007 ENLARGEMENT

  • Bulgaria
  • Romania

MAY 2004 ENLARGEMENT

  • Cyprus
  • Estonia
  • Hungary
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Malta
  • Poland
  • The Czech Republic
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia

Pre-accession agricultural instrument

Pre-accession agricultural instrument

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Pre-accession agricultural instrument

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Pre-accession agricultural instrument (SAPARD)

Sapard is a Community framework for supporting sustainable agricultural and rural development in the central and eastern European applicant countries (CEECs) during the 2000-2006 pre-accession process. It is designed to solve problems affecting the long-term adjustment of the agricultural sector and rural areas and to help implement the Community acquis in matters of the common agricultural policy and related policies.

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1268/99 of 21 June 1999 on Community support for pre-accession measures for agriculture and rural development in the applicant countries of central and eastern Europe in the pre-accession period [See amending acts]

Summary

This Regulation is part of the follow-up to the Commission’s ” Agenda 2000 ” Communication and the conclusions of the Luxembourg European Council, which provided for financial aid for the CEECs in the form of structural and agricultural instruments for the period 2000-2006. Sapard and the other 2000-2006 pre-accession instruments have been replaced for the period 2007-2013 by the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA), which is the sole instrument for assisting the candidate countries and the potential candidate countries of the Western Balkans.

Eligible measures

Support for agriculture and rural development is focused on the priorities in this sector, and in particular on:

  • investment in agricultural holdings;
  • improving the processing and marketing of agricultural and fishery products;
  • improving structures for quality, veterinary and plant-health controls in the interests of food quality and consumer protection;
  • agricultural production methods designed to protect the environment and maintain the countryside;
  • development and diversification of economic activities;
  • setting up relief and management services for farmers;
  • setting up producer groups;
  • renovation and development of villages and the protection and conservation of the rural heritage;
  • land improvement and re-parcelling;
  • establishment and updating of land registers;
  • improvement of vocational training;
  • development and improvement of rural infrastructure;
  • water resources management;
  • forestry, including forestation, investments in forest holdings owned by private forest owners and processing and marketing of forestry products;
  • technical assistance for the measures covered by this Regulation, including studies to assist with the preparation and monitoring of the programme, information and publicity campaigns;
  • designing and implementing local and regional rural development strategies for rural communities in Bulgaria and Romania.

Complementarity

Community action must complement corresponding national actions or contribute to them. The Commission must ensure that the Community measures bring added value to national initiatives and to the achievement of the Regulation’s objectives.

Natural and legal persons from the Member States, the candidate countries and the Western Balkan countries are eligible to participate in invitations to tender and contracts.

Programming

Rural development measures must be the subject of a plan drawn up at the most appropriate geographical level. Such plans are to be prepared by the competent authorities of the applicant country, cover a period of up to seven years from 1 January 2000 and contain the following information:

  • a quantified description of the current situation showing disparities, shortcomings and potential for development, the main results of earlier operations in the same field, the financial resources deployed and any evaluation results available;
  • a description of the proposed strategy, its quantified objectives, the chosen priorities and the geographical scope;
  • a prior appraisal of the expected economic, environmental and social impact, including effects on employment;
  • an indicative overall financial table summarising the national, Community and, where appropriate, private financial resources earmarked for each of the chosen priorities;
  • for each year covered by the programming period, an indicative financial profile for each source of programme funding;
  • where appropriate, information on any studies, training or technical assistance operations needed for the preparation, implementation or adaptation of the measures concerned;
  • the competent authorities and bodies appointed to carry out the programme;
  • a definition of “final beneficiaries”, i.e. the public or private organisations or enterprises responsible for conducting the operations;
  • a description of the measures contemplated for implementing the plans, and in particular aid schemes;
  • provisions ensuring proper implementation of the programme, including monitoring, evaluation and the fixing of quantified evaluation indicators, and arrangements for controls and penalties;
  • the results of consultations and measures to involve competent authorities and bodies and the relevant economic, social and environmental partners.

Development plans must give priority to measures to improve market efficiency, quality and health standards and measures to maintain jobs and create new employment opportunities in rural areas, with due regard for provisions on the protection of the environment.

Applicant countries should submit their rural development plans within six months of the Regulation’s entry into force. On the basis of these plans, the Commission then has six months to approve the individual rural and agricultural development programmes in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 50 of the Regulation laying down general provisions on the Structural Funds. The Commission must also appraise the proposed plan’s consistency with the Regulation.

Revision of the programme

The programme may be revised and amended in the light of:

  • socio-economic change, new information and the results of the actions concerned;
  • measures taken in the context of the accession partnership and the national programme for the adoption of the Community acquis;
  • the redistribution of resources following an applicant country’s accession to the European Union (Article 15 of the Regulation).

Prior appraisal, monitoring and evaluation

Aid under the Regulation is subject to prior appraisal, on-going monitoring and ex post evaluation. Monitoring is based on specific physical, environmental and financial indicators fixed beforehand, and on annual reports to the Commission from each applicant country.

Compatibility

Measures financed under the Regulation must comply with the commitments given in the accession partnership and be consistent with the principles of the national programme for the adoption of the Community acquis. They must also be consistent with the provisions of the Europe Agreements.

They must also be consistent with the objectives of the common agricultural policy (CAP), especially with regard to the market organisations, and Community structural measures. They must not cause disturbances on the market.

Financial arrangements

Financial assistance under this Regulation is granted during the period from 2000 to 2006. The annual appropriations are authorised within the limits of the financial perspective. The financial contribution may take the form of advances, part-financing or financing.

Within three months of the adoption of this Regulation, the Commission will inform each applicant country of its decisions concerning the indicative seven-year financial allocation.

The financial allocation is based on:

  • farming population,
  • agricultural area,
  • gross domestic product (GDP) in purchasing power parity,
  • specific territorial situation.

Up to 2% of the annual allocation may be used to finance measures taken on the initiative of the Commission for preliminary studies, exchange visits, evaluations and controls.

Rate of contribution

The Community will not normally contribute more than 75% of the total eligible public expenditure. In certain specific cases, it may, however, cover 100% of the total eligible. For revenue-generating investments, public aid may cover up to 50% of the total eligible cost.

Furthermore, Regulation (EC) No 696/2003 increases the natural contribution which may be made to projects to deal with exceptional disasters. This may amount to 85% of total eligible public expenditure or, in the case of revenue-generating projects, 75%.

Financial control

Financial support is governed by the principles laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1258/1999.

The Commission implements expenditure under this Regulation in accordance with the Financial Regulation applicable to the general budget of the European Communities, on the basis of the financing memorandum to be drawn up between the Commission and the applicant country.

Without prejudice to checks carried out by beneficiary countries, the Commission and the Court of Auditors may carry out on-the-spot technical or financial audits.

Reduction, suspension or cancellation of aid

If the implementation of a measure does not appear to justify any part of the finance allocated to it, the Commission examines the case, inviting the country concerned or its competent authorities to submit their comments within a specified period. Following the examination, the Commission may reduce or suspend aid for the measure concerned.

Implementing procedures

The Commission will adopt detailed rules for the implementation of the Regulation in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 50(2) of Regulation (EC) No 1260/1999.

It will also adopt detailed financial implementing rules in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 13 of Regulation (EC) No 1258/1999.

Reports

Each year the Commission will report to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions on support granted under the Regulation.

Publicity

Programmes drawn up under the Regulation must be given appropriate publicity in the applicant countries. Such publicity must inform the general public inter alia of the Community’s role in the aid.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1268/99 29.06.1999 – 31.12.2006 OJ L 161 of 26.06.1999

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 696/2003 20.04.2003 OJ L 99 of 17.04.2003
Regulation (EC) No 769/2004 30.04.2004 OJ L 123 of 27.04.2004
Regulation (EC) No 2008/2004 28.11.2004 OJ L 349 of 25.11.2004
Regulation (EC) No 2257/2004 02.01.2005 OJ L 389 of 30.12.2004
Regulation (EC) No 2112/2005 28.12.2005 OJ L 344 of 27.12.2005

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EC) No 447/2004 of 10 March 2004 laying down rules to facilitate the transition from support under Regulation (EC) No 1268/1999 to that provided for by Regulations (EC) Nos 1257/1999 and 1260/1999 for the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Hungary, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia [Official Journal L 72 of 11.03.2004].

CONDITIONS OF ELIGIBILITY FOR AID

Commission Decision 1999/595/EC of 20 July 1999 on the indicative allocation of the annual Community contribution to pre-accession measures for agriculture and rural development [Official Journal L 226 of 27.08.1999].
The allocation valid for the period 2000-06 is indicated in the annex to the Decision.

Commission Regulation (EC) No 2759/1999 of 22 December 1999 laying down rules for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 1268/1999 on Community support for pre-accession measures for agriculture and rural development in the applicant countries of central and eastern Europe in the pre-accession period [Official Journal L 331 of 23.12.1999].


The Regulation specifies the conditions under which aid can be granted for investment in agricultural holdings, improving the processing and marketing of agricultural and fishery products, agri-environmental measures, training, producer groups and forestry. It also gives details on the eligibility of expenditure, the management body, monitoring indicators, annual and final reports and assessments.
This Regulation has been amended by the following measure:
Regulation (EC) No 2356/2000 [Official Journal L 272 of 25.10.2000
The Regulation amends the provisions of Commission Regulation (EC) No 2759/1999 on aid to improve processing and marketing conditions for agricultural and fishery products and the eligibility of expenditure.
Regulation (EC) No 2251/2001 [Official Journal L 304 of 21.11.2001].
Regulation (EC) No 2251/2002 [Official Journal L 343 of 18.12.2002].
Regulation (EC) No 775/2003 [Official Journal L 112 of 06.05.2003]
Regulation (EC) No 2278/2004 [Official Journal L 396 of 31.12.2004].

DECENTRALISED MANAGEMENT

Commission Regulation (EC) No 2222/2000 of 7 June 2000 laying down financial rules for the application of Council Regulation (EC) No 1268/1999 on Community support for pre-accession measures for agriculture and rural development in the applicant countries of central and eastern Europe in the pre-accession period [Official Journal L 253 of 07.10.2000].
The Regulation lays down the conditions under which management of the aid is handed over to bodies in the ten applicant countries.
It has been amended by the following measures:
Regulation (EC) No 2252/2001 [Official Journal L 304 of 21.11.2001].
Regulation (EC) No 188/2003 [Official Journal L 27 of 01.02.2003]
Regulation (EC) No 1052/2006 [[Official Journal L 189 of 12.07.2006].

ANNUAL REPORTS AND SPECIAL REPORTS

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – Sapard Annual Report – Year 2000 [COM(2001) 341 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission report – General report on pre-accession assistance (Phare, Ispa, Sapard) in 2000 [COM (2002) 781 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – Sapard Annual Report – Year 2001 [COM(2002) 434 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission report – General report on pre-accession assistance (Phare, Ispa, Sapard) in 2001 [COM(2003) 329 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission report – General report on pre-accession assistance (Phare, Ispa, Sapard) in 2002 [COM(2003) 844 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – Sapard Annual Report – Year 2002 [COM(2003) 582 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission – 2002 Report on phare and the pre-accession instruments for Cyprus, Malta and Turkey [COM(2003) 497 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – Sapard Annual Report – Year 2003 [COM(2004) 851 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission 2003 report on Phare and the pre-accession instruments for Cyprus, Malta and Turkey [COM(2005) 64 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission 2004 report on Phare, pre-accession and transition instruments [COM(2005) 701 final – Not published in the Official Journal]

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – SAPARD annual report [COM(2005)537 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council – General report on pre-accession assistance (Phare – Ispa – Sapard) in 2004 [COM(2006) 137 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions – SAPARD Annual Report – Year 2005 [COM(2006) 780 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the European Parliament and the Council – General report on pre-accession assistance (PHARE – ISPA – SAPARD) in 2005 [COM(2006) 746 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament – 2005 report on PHARE, pre-accession and transition instruments – COM(2007) 3 – Not published in the Official Journal].

This summary is for information only and is not designed to interpret or replace the reference document.

Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance

Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA)

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1085/2006 of 17 July 2006 establishing an Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) is the financial instrument for the European Union (EU) pre-accession process for the period 2007-2013. Assistance is provided on the basis of the European Partnerships of the potential candidates and the Accession Partnerships of the candidate countries, which means the Western Balkan countries, Turkey and Iceland. The IPA is intended as a flexible instrument and therefore provides assistance which depends on the progress made by the beneficiary countries and their needs as shown in the Commission’s evaluations and strategy papers.

Nature of the IPA

The beneficiary countries are divided into two categories, depending on their status as either candidate countries under the accession process or potential candidates under the stabilisation and association process, namely:

  • candidate countries (Annex I to the Regulation): the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Croatia, Turkey;
  • potential candidate countries as defined at the Santa Maria da Feira European Council of 20 June 2000 (Annex II to the Regulation): Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia including Kosovo as defined by the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244/1999.

The annexes will be amended as and when changes in the status of the countries occur, pursuant to a Council decision adopted by qualified majority on a proposal from the Commission.

Exceptionally, and in the interests of coherence and efficiency, other countries may benefit from measures financed by the IPA. Provided these measures form part of a regional, cross-border, trans-national or worldwide framework and do not duplicate other programmes under Community external aid instruments.

The IPA was designed so as to address the needs of the beneficiary countries within the context of pre-accession policy in the most appropriate way. Its main aim is to support institution-building and the rule of law, human rights, including the fundamental freedoms, minority rights, gender equality and non-discrimination, both administrative and economic reforms, economic and social development, reconciliation and reconstruction, and regional and cross-border cooperation.

To ensure targeted, effective and coherent action, the IPA is made up of five components, each covering priorities defined according to the needs of the beneficiary countries. Two components concern all beneficiary countries:

  • the “support for transition and institution-building” component, aimed at financing capacity-building and institution-building;
  • the “cross-border cooperation” component, aimed at supporting the beneficiary countries in the area of cross-border cooperation between themselves, with the EU Member States or within the framework of cross-border or inter-regional actions.

The other three components are aimed at candidate countries only:

  • the “regional development” component, aimed at supporting the countries’ preparations for the implementation of the Community’s cohesion policy, and in particular for the European Regional Development Fund and the Cohesion Fund;
  • the “human resources development” component, which concerns preparation for participation in cohesion policy and the European Social Fund;
  • the “rural development” component, which concerns preparation for the common agricultural policy and related policies and for the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD).

Candidate countries are therefore prepared for full implementation of the Community acquis at the time of accession. While potential candidates shall benefit from support to progressively align themselves to the Community acquis. Potential candidates may however benefit from similar measures as those provided under the last three components under the framework of the first component. The difference is essentially in the way these measures are implemented, since for the three components preparing for implementation of the structural and agricultural funds the beneficiary country is required to manage Community funds in a decentralised manner.

Management and implementation of the IPA

The IPA is based on strategic multi-annual planning established in accordance with the broad political guidelines set out in the Commission’s enlargement package, which now includes a Multi-annual Indicative Financial Framework (MIFF). The MIFF takes the form of a table presenting the Commission’s intentions for the allocation of funds for the three forthcoming years, broken down by beneficiary and by component, on the basis of the needs and the administrative and management capacity of the country concerned and compliance with the Copenhagen accession criteria.

The strategic planning is made up of multi-annual indicative planning documents, with the MIFF constituting the reference framework. They are established for each beneficiary country and cover the main intervention areas envisaged for that country.

As regards action on the ground, annual or multi-annual programmes (depending on the component) based on the indicative planning documents, are adopted by the Commission. They are implemented following three management methods: by centralised, decentralised or shared management.

Assistance under the IPA can take, inter alia, the following forms:

  • investment, procurement contracts or subsidies;
  • administrative cooperation, involving experts sent from the Member States;
  • participation in Community programmes or agencies;
  • measures to support the implementation process and management of the programmes;
  • budget support (granted exceptionally and subject to supervision).

The rules of participation for implementing the different programmes launched under the IPA are flexible enough to ensure that the instrument is effective. Participation in the award of procurement or grant contracts is open to all natural and legal persons and international organisations. As such, natural persons must be nationals of, or legal persons established in:

  • a Member State of the EU or the European Economic Area (EEA);
  • a country that is a beneficiary of the IPA or a country that is a beneficiary of the European Neighbourhood and Partnership Instrument (ENPI).

Moreover participation is also open to natural and legal persons from countries other than those mentioned above where these countries enjoy reciprocal access to Community external assistance. Reciprocal access is based on a country’s or regional group of countries’ status as a donor and is subject to a Commission decision adopted after consulting the IPA Committee.

All supplies and materials needed to implement such contracts must comply with the rules of origin, in other words they must originate in the EU or a country eligible under the previous paragraph. Experts are not subject to the nationality condition.

However, in exceptional cases, the Commission may depart from these rules. Moreover, operations may be co-financed by the EU and a regional organisation, a Member State or a third country (subject to reciprocity), or financed by the EU and implemented via an international organisation. In this case the natural or legal persons eligible for co-financing are also entitled to IAP financing.

The management of funds granted under this Regulation complies with the general management conditions for Community funds set out in Regulation (EC, Euratom) No 1605/2002, which the Commission is responsible for implementing (management, monitoring, evaluation, reporting). Such management must also comply strictly with the rules on the protection of the Community’s financial interests. In this context the Commission and the Court of Auditors have the power of audit over all contractors and subcontractors, on the basis of documents and on the spot, ex ante and ex post.

The Commission is also assisted by committees. The purpose of the IPA Committee set up by the Regulation is to ensure coordination and coherence between assistance granted under the different components. However, for implementing the “regional development”, “human resources development” and “rural development” components, the Commission is assisted by committees established within the framework of each structural fund.

The application of the IPA is also subject to a suspension clause, which applies to all beneficiary countries that fail to comply with the principles of democracy, the rule of law, human rights and minority rights, and the commitments contained in the partnership (accession partnership or European partnership). It also applies to countries that fail to make sufficient progress towards fulfilment of accession criteria or, for the Western Balkan countries, towards the reform process. The Council may then take appropriate measures, acting by qualified majority on a proposal from the Commission, after informing the European Parliament.

Background

This Regulation forms part of the revised external aid framework for the 2007-2013 financial perspective, in particular in terms of efficiency and coherence, while taking into account the specific features of pre-accession aid. The IPA must be consistent with development aid, but its primary aim is to prepare the beneficiary countries for accession in the not too distant future. One of the main characteristics of pre-accession aid is its bridging function, since it is designed to prepare countries for the period after accession.

The IPA therefore provides a unique and rationalised framework. As such it will replace, from 1 January 2007, the programmes for the period 2000-2006, namely:

  • the programmes for candidate countries, namely Phare, SAPARD and ISPA, Phare Cross-Border Cooperation (CBC) and Coordination, pre-accession financial assistance for Turkey;
  • the programmes for potential candidate countries, namely CARDS.

References

Act Entry into force – Date of expiry Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EC) No 1085/2006

1.8.2006 – 31.12.2013

OJ L 210, 31.7.2006

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal

Regulation (EU) No 540/2010

14.7.2010

OJ L 158 of 24.6.2010

Related Acts

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IAP

Commission Regulation (EU) No 80/2010 of 28 January 2010 amending Regulation (EC) No 718/2007 implementing Council Regulation (EC) No 1085/2006 establishing an instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA)
This Regulation clarifies the rules on granting and evaluating pre-accession assistance. Furthermore, it establishes Community rules for the five thematic IPA components. It also includes the potential for funding granted under cross-border cooperation.

Commission Regulation (EC) No 718/2007 of 12 June 2007 implementing Council Regulation (EC) No 1085/2006 establishing an instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA) [Official Journal L 170 of 29.6.2007].

Decision 2007/766/EC of 14 November 2007 drawing up the list of regions and areas eligible for financing under the Cross-border Cooperation Component of the Instrument for Pre-accession Assistance for the purpose of cross-border cooperation between Member States and beneficiary countries for the period 2007 to 2013 [Official Journal L 310 of 28.11.2007].

PLANNING

Communication from the Communication to the European Parliament and the Council of 12 October 2011 – Instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA). Revised multi-annual indicative financial framework for 2012-2013 [COM(2011) 641 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 14 October 2009 – Instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA) – Multi-annual indicative financial framework for 2011-2013 [COM(2009) 543 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament of 5 November 2008 – Instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA) multi-annual indicative financial framework for 2010-2012 [COM(2008) 705 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission to the Council and the European Parliament – Instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA) – Multi-annual indicative financial framework for 2009-2011 [COM(2007) 689 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Communication from the Commission of 8 November 2006 to the Council and the European Parliament – Instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA). Multi-annual indicative financial framework for 2008-2010 [COM(2006) 672 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

REPORT

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee of 23 December 2009 – 2008 ANNUAL Report on the implementation of the instrument for pre-accession assistance (IPA) [COM(2009) 699 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Report from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee of 15 December 2008 – 2007 Annual IPA Report [COM(2008) 850 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1203 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia was granted candidate country status for European Union (EU) membership in 2005. The Accession Partnership, adopted by the Council in 2008, supports the country’s preparations in view of its future membership and the alignment of its legislation with the Community acquis. In 2008, the accession negotiations had not yet been opened, as some progress still needed to be made on the objectives and conditions set out in the partnership.

The 2011 Report notes progress made with regard to alignment with the acquis, although the administrative capacities are not yet fully operational. Furthermore, the report notes satisfactory progress on food security matters.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The agriculture chapter covers a large number of binding rules, many of which are directly applicable. The proper application of these rules and their effective enforcement by an efficient public administration are essential for the functioning of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The CAP includes the setting-up of management and control systems such as a paying agency and the Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS), and also the capacity to implement rural development measures. EU accession requires integration into the common market organisations for a range of agricultural products, including arable crops, sugar, animal products and specialised crops. Member States must also be able to apply EU legislation on direct aid for farmers and to manage the common market organisations for various agricultural products.

The fisheries
acquis consists of regulations, which do not need to be transposed into national legislation. However, it requires the introduction of measures to prepare the administration and operators for participation in the Common Fisheries Policy (in the areas of market policy, resource and fleet management, inspection and control, structural actions and State aid). In some cases, existing fisheries agreements or conventions with third countries or international organisations need to be adapted.

This chapter covers detailed rules in the area of food safety. The general foodstuffs policy sets hygiene rules for foodstuff production. Furthermore, the acquis provides detailed rules in the veterinary field, which are essential for safeguarding animal health, animal welfare and safety of food of animal origin in the internal market. In the phytosanitary field, EU rules cover issues such as quality of seed, plant protection material, harmful organisms and animal nutrition.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

Further progress was achieved in the field of agriculture and rural development. Key support policies for agricultural and rural development are gradually being aligned with EU requirements. Alignment with the acquis requires continuing sustained efforts. Administrative capacity remains a concern throughout the sector.

There was good progress in the area of food safety, veterinary and phytosanitary policy, in particular with respect to the adoption of new framework legislation. Administrative capacity of the Food and Veterinary Agency remains however insufficient to ensure proper implementation of the acquis.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].

In its 2010 Report, the Commission noted the country’s progress towards alignment in the field of agricultural policy and rural development. Similarly, the country had also made progress on food security matters. Strengthening administrative capacity in these two areas remains essential. Furthermore, preparations have begun on the implementation of the Fisheries policy.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

In its November 2008 report, the Commission notes that considerable efforts are required by the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM) to align its agricultural legislation with EU legislation. There has been progress in the field of agriculture and on rural development. In the field of food safety, the administrative capacity has been strengthened in terms of both the number and competence of staff. Preparations for implementation of the common fisheries policy are at an early stage.

Turkey – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Turkey – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Turkey – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Turkey – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The 2011 Report notes progress on agricultural and rural development matters. The European Commission believes that the country is ready to move to the second phase of the Instrument for pre-Accession Assistance in Rural Development (IPARD) programme. Food security and veterinary and phytosanitary policy are also progressing, as is the fisheries policy. However, animal welfare still needs to be improved.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The agriculture chapter covers a large number of binding rules, many of which are directly applicable. The proper application of these rules and their effective enforcement by an efficient public administration are essential for the functioning of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The CAP includes the setting-up of management and control systems such as a paying agency and the Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS), and also the capacity to implement rural development measures. EU accession requires integration into the common market organisations for a range of agricultural products, including arable crops, sugar, animal products and specialised crops. Member States must also be able to apply EU legislation on direct aid for farmers and to manage the common market organisations for various agricultural products.

The fisheries
acquis consists of regulations, which do not need to be transposed into national legislation. However, it requires the introduction of measures to prepare the administration and operators for participation in the Common Fisheries Policy (in the areas of market policy, resource and fleet management, inspection and control, structural actions and State aid). In some cases, existing fisheries agreements or conventions with third countries or international organisations need to be adapted.

This chapter covers detailed rules in the area of food safety. The general foodstuffs policy sets hygiene rules for foodstuff production. Furthermore, the acquis provides detailed rules in the veterinary field, which are essential for safeguarding animal health, animal welfare and safety of food of animal origin in the internal market. In the phytosanitary field, EU rules cover issues such as quality of seed, plant protection material, harmful organisms and animal nutrition.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

There is some progress to report in the area of agriculture and rural development. Significant progress has been made in the implementation of the Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance for Rural Development (IPARD) programme, leading to the Commission Decision to confer the management of EU funds, as well as in preparations achieved for the second phase of the IPARD programme. Agricultural support policy differs substantially from the CAP and there is still no strategy for its alignment. The failure to fully remove barriers to beef imports also constitutes a major shortcoming.

As regards food safety, veterinary and phytosanitary policy, progress towards transposition and implementation of the acquis has been achieved. The restructuring of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs is a positive step towards strengthening the official control system. The overall control system is still not fully in line with the EU acquis. Considerable effort is needed in the area of animal health and in bringing agri-food establishments into compliance with the EU hygiene and structural requirements.

In fisheries, some progress can be reported overall. In particular some progress has been made on setting up administrative structures as well as on resource and fleet management. Turkey is expected to make further progress in other areas such as inspections and controls.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1327 – Not published in the Official Journal].

In its 2010 Report, the Commission noted the improvements in the management of the fisheries sector and marine resources. On the other hand, in the field of agriculture, considerable efforts remained to be made in order to develop an appropriate administration, to remove obstacles to trade, to improve the quality of production and to encourage rural development.

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1334 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2699 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2008 Report indicated that progress made in terms of alignment with the acquis remained limited. Turkey has however strengthened the capacity required to implement IPARD. However, it still had to put into place the corresponding administrative and monitoring structures. Turkey seemed to be drifting away from the principles governing the reformed CAP by encouraging aid related to production.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1436 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2007 Report recorded some progress on agriculture, in particular the adoption of the legislation on the paying agency for the instrument for pre-accession assistance in the field of rural development (IPARD). Turkey also needed to continue aligning its legislation with the post-reform CAP. On fisheries, there had been some progress as regards resource and fleet management, but more work was needed.

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1390 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2006 Report showed that legislative changes had produced uneven results in the field of agriculture. Some progress had been seen on rural development. However, Turkey’s adoption of a new law on agriculture signalled a move away from the principles of the reformed CAP. No progress was reported on fisheries. Limited progress had been made in aligning veterinary, plant-health and food policies. Neither the legislative framework nor the administrative structures to allow implementation of the acquis had been set up.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1426 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The October 2005 Report indicated that limited progress had been made on alignment with the Common Agriculture Policy mechanisms. In addition, Turkey needed to build the administrative capacity needed to ensure implementation. Nonetheless, progress had been reported in some areas of veterinary, plant-health and food policies. Turkey had not made substantial progress in the fisheries sector, regarding either legislation or administrative restructuring.

Commission Report [COM(2004) 656 final – SEC(2004) 1201 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The October 2004 Report registered that only limited progress had been made since the previous report. Turkey needed to pursue the process of alignment and improve the administrative capacity necessary to satisfy the essential requirements for implementing EU agricultural rules. Similarly, the degree of alignment with the acquis and application of existing regulations was limited.

Commission Report [COM(2003) 676 final – SEC(2003) 1212 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2003 Report highlighted the continued effort being made by Turkey. Generally, programmes needed to be launched in most sectors. Some progress had been made, particularly in the veterinary and plant-health fields, but Turkey had to do more to align its legislation. Limited progress had been made on fisheries.

Commission Report [COM(2002) 700 final – SEC(2002) 1412 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2002 Report showed the limited progress made by Turkey on alignment with EU agriculture and fisheries legislation.

Commission Report [COM(2001) 700 final – SEC(2001) 1756 – Not published in the Official Journal].

The November 2001 Report showed that Turkey was only beginning the process of alignment with the acquis. Moreover, no progress had been made since the previous report on either agriculture or fisheries.

Commission Report [COM(2000) 713 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2000 Report underlined that many changes were needed to align Turkish agricultural policy with the Community acquis. No progress had been made on fisheries since the previous report.

Commission Report [COM(1999) 513 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

In its October 1999 Report, the Commission noted that Turkey would have to make substantial efforts to align its agricultural policy with the Community acquis. There was no information available to assess Turkey’s progress in the area of fisheries.

Commission Report [COM(1998) 711 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Iceland – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Iceland – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Iceland – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Iceland – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2011) 666 final – SEC(2011) 1202 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

The 2011 Commission Report identifies the progress which still needs to be achieved by Iceland in the fields of agriculture and fisheries. The provisions of the European Union (EU) acquis on food safety are applied by the country following the adoption of the European Economic Area (EEA) Agreement.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s words)

The agriculture chapter covers a large number of binding rules, many of which are directly applicable. The proper application of these rules and their effective enforcement by an efficient public administration are essential for the functioning of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). The CAP includes the setting-up of management and control systems such as a paying agency and the Integrated Administration and Control System (IACS), and also the capacity to implement rural development measures. EU accession requires integration into the common market organisations for a range of agricultural products, including arable crops, sugar, animal products and specialised crops. Member States must also be able to apply EU legislation on direct aid for farmers and to manage the common market organisations for various agricultural products.

The fisheries
acquis consists of regulations, which do not need to be transposed into national legislation. However, it requires the introduction of measures to prepare the administration and operators for participation in the Common Fisheries Policy (in the areas of market policy, resource and fleet management, inspection and control, structural actions and State aid). In some cases, existing fisheries agreements or conventions with third countries or international organisations need to be adapted.

This chapter covers detailed rules in the area of food safety. The general foodstuffs policy sets hygiene rules for foodstuff production. Furthermore, the acquis provides detailed rules in the veterinary field, which are essential for safeguarding animal health, animal welfare and safety of food of animal origin in the internal market. In the phytosanitary field, EU rules cover issues such as quality of seed, plant protection material, harmful organisms and animal nutrition.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s words)

The majority of the agricultural policy is still not aligned with the European provisions and no new legislative measures have been undertaken by Iceland. Appropriate administrative structures must also be established in this field.

Overall Iceland has aligned its legislation with the EU acquis on matters of food safety, veterinary policy and phytosanitary policy. However, Iceland’s legislation on live animals is still not aligned and no new development has been noted. The European legislative package relating to hygiene shall be put in place in November 2011. Additional progress is required concerning legislation on phytopharmaceutical products, novel foods, and also to strengthen administrative capacities and the capacities of laboratories.

The country continues to apply a fisheries policy, which has similar objectives to those of the European fisheries policy. However, the applicable rules continue to differ considerably. The legislation is not aligned with the EU acquis and no new development has been noted. The mechanisms for putting in place and monitoring European support measures must also be established. The existing restrictions to foreign investment in the fisheries sector are not aligned with the European rules.

Croatia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Croatia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Croatia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Croatia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

acquis) and, more specifically, the priorities identified jointly by the Commission and the candidate countries in the analytical assessment (or ‘screening’) of the EU’s political and legislative acquis. Each year, the Commission reviews the progress made by candidates and evaluates the efforts required before their accession. This monitoring is the subject of annual reports presented to the Council and the European Parliament.

Document or Iniciative

Commission Report [COM(2010) 660 final – SEC(2010) 1326 – Not published in the Official Journal].

Summary

In its 2010 Report, the Commission reviews the progress made in the agricultural sector, in particular the establishment of standards, checks and a payment system compatible with the common agricultural market. In the fisheries sector, progress remains to be made in the area of fleet management, inspection and implementation of international agreements. Finally, in the area of food safety, a programme of action has been adopted to improve the quality of products of animal origin.

EUROPEAN UNION ACQUIS (according to the Commission’s word’s)

The agriculture chapter covers a large number of binding rules, many of which are directly applicable. The proper application of these rules and their effective enforcement by an efficient public administration are essential for the functioning of the common agricultural policy. This includes the setting up of management systems such as a paying agency and the Integrated Administration and Control System, and also the capacity to implement rural development measures. EU accession requires integration into the common market organisations for a range of agricultural products, including arable crops, sugar, animal products and specialised crops. Finally, this chapter covers detailed rules in the veterinary field, which are essential for safeguarding animal health and food safety on the internal market, as well as in the area of plant health, which covers aspects such as seed quality, plant protection products and harmful organisms.

The fisheries legislation consists of Regulations, which do not need to be transposed into national legislation. However, it requires the introduction of measures to prepare the administration and operators for participation in the common fisheries policy (in the areas of market policy, resource and fleet management, inspection and control, structural action and state aid). In some cases, existing fisheries agreements or conventions with third countries or international organisations need to be adapted.

Regarding food safety, the general foodstuffs policy sets hygiene rules for foodstuff production. Furthermore, the acquis provides detailed rules in the veterinary field, which are essential for safeguarding animal health, animal welfare and safety of food of animal origin in the internal market. In the phytosanitary field, EU rules cover issues such as quality of seed, plant protection material, harmful organisms and animal nutrition.

EVALUATION (according to the Commission’s word’s)

Good progress can be reported in the field of agriculture and rural development, in particular on establishment and implementation of the paying agency and of the integrated administration and control system and on the common market organisation.

However, considerable efforts in these key areas of the Common Agricultural Policy need to be sustained. Croatia also needs to align the agricultural support system fully with the acquis and to increase absorption capacity for rural development funds.

Croatia has made good progress in aligning with the acquis in the field of fisheries. Preparations for applying fisheries policy are well advanced. Croatia needs to improve implementation of the legislation, in particular with regard to fleet management, inspection and control and structural policy.

Good progress has been made in alignment in the field of food safety, veterinary and phytosanitary policy, in particular with the adoption and implementation of secondary legislation. Transposition of the acquis is well advanced in all sectors. Significant progress has been made through the adoption of the national programme for upgrading establishments for food of animal origin and animal by-products. Continued efforts are required regarding the programme’s implementation, as well as on strengthening administrative and control capacity, and setting up border inspection posts.

Related Acts

Commission Report [COM(2009) 533 final – SEC(2009) 1333 final – Not published in the Official Journal].

Commission Report [COM(2008) 674 final – SEC(2008) 2694 final – Not published in the Official Journal].br/>The November 2008 Report stated uneven progress in the area of agriculture and rural development. Progress in quality policy and organic farming were already satisfactory. Efforts had to be stepped up concerning the Paying Agency, IACS and the LPIS. Moreover, support linked to production had to be progressively aligned with the Single Payment Scheme, pursuant to the CAP reform. In the area of fisheries, efforts had to be maintained to close gaps concerning fleet management, inspections and controls, structural action and state aid.

Commission Report [COM(2007) 663 final – SEC(2007) 1431 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2007 Report concluded that Croatia had continued to make progress on organic farming, quality policy and rural development. Preparations for implementing the instrument for pre-accession assistance for rural development (IPARD) for 2007-2013 needed to be intensified. Greater efforts were also needed in setting up the IACS and the Land Parcel Identification System (LPIS) and applying the post-reform common agricultural policy (CAP).

Commission Report [COM(2006) 649 final – SEC(2006) 1390 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The December 2006 Report noted that progress had been made by Croatia in the implementation of programmes on rural development, quality policy and organic farming.
On fisheries, some progress had been made on the management of resources and the fishing fleet, and the strengthening of the departments responsible for inspections. Lastly, while pointing to some improvements in veterinary, plant health and food policy, the Report stressed that major efforts were needed, in particular as regards the adoption of an overall strategy on food safety.

Commission Report [COM(2005) 561 final – SEC(2005) 1424 – Not published in the Official Journal].
The November 2005 Report noted that there had been little progress in the preparatory work on putting in place the instruments necessary for managing the common agricultural policy. Moreover, farming was still experiencing major structural problems.
In the field of fisheries, the legislative framework and the structure for the central administration of fisheries had been improved. Nevertheless, the legislation had incorporated only part of the acquis, and the administrative structures did not yet satisfy the requirements of the common fisheries policy.

Commission Opinion [COM(2004) 257 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
In its Opinion of April 2004 the European Commission concluded that considerable efforts were required by Croatia to align its agricultural legislation with the EU’s legislation and to apply it in the medium term. This would require the phasing out of the various measures not in line with EU law and the creation of the basic instruments for managing the common agricultural policy, including an EU-approved paying agency and an integrated administration and control system (IACS). As regards fisheries, Croatia had to continue adapting its legislation in line with the body of EU law by putting in place the necessary structures for managing market instruments and Community funds and appropriate controls.