Author Archives: Lewis Looper

Single Market for Services

Single Market for Services

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Single market for services

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Internal market > Single market for services

Single market for services

Services account for more than 70 % of the economic activity of the Member States and a similar proportion of employment. The freedom to provide services and freedom of establishment, as set out in Articles 49 and 56 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU), are therefore essential to the smooth operation of the internal market. In this way, economic operators can pursue a stable, continuous activity in one or more Member States and/or offer temporary services in another Member State without having to be established there.

The European Union is therefore working towards providing frameworks for these two principles in order to guarantee the smooth functioning of the single market for services, and especially cross-border services. The EU has achieved significant progress in the area of certain services. Moreover, in 2006 it adopted the “Services” Directive which aims at removing barriers to trade and services, and at facilitating cross-border operations.

Single market for services Contents

  • Financial services: general framework
  • Financial services: banking
  • Financial services: insurance
  • Financial services: transactions in securities

GENERAL POLICIES

  • ‘Services’ Directive
  • Posting of workers in the framework of the provision of services
  • The principle of equal treatment for men and women outside the labour market
  • The competitiveness of business-related services
  • System for the recognition of professional qualifications

SECTORAL PROVISIONS

Liberal professions

  • Competition in professional services

Services of general interest

  • Reform of the EU State aid rules on Services of General Economic Interest
  • New European commitment for services of general interest
  • White Paper on services of general interest
  • Social services of general interest

Road transport

  • Common rules for access to the international road haulage market
  • Common rules for access to the international market for coach and bus services
  • Goods: Non-resident carriers in the national market

Marine transport

  • Freedom to supply services, competition, unfair pricing practices and free access to ocean trade
  • Freedom to provide services within the Member States (ocean trade)
  • Freedom to provide maritime transport services
  • Inland navigation: non-resident carriers
  • Inland navigation: transport of goods or passengers by inland waterway between Member States

Air transport

  • Air service agreements between Member States and third countries

Information society

  • Legal aspects of electronic commerce (“Directive on electronic commerce”)
  • A new framework for electronic communications services
  • Regulatory framework for electronic communications
  • Authorisation of electronic communications networks and services
  • Universal service and users’ rights
  • Access to electronic communications networks
  • Data protection in the electronic communications sector
  • Online gambling (Green Paper)

Postal services

  • The Establishment of an Internal Postal Market

Agriculture: enlargement

Agriculture: enlargement

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Agriculture: enlargement

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Agriculture > Agriculture: enlargement

Agriculture: enlargement

The recent enlargements of the European Union have had the effect of increasing the significance of agriculture and have resulted in new economic and social challenges for the common agricultural policy (CAP). The new Member States have huge agricultural potential in terms of human resources and providing further farmland. However, this potential has yet to be fully realised. There is a considerable socioeconomic divide between the old and the new Member States in the agricultural sector. Through its intervention, the EU aims to prepare candidate countries for implementing the CAP, specifically by adapting their infrastructure and reducing the disparities between Member States upon their accession.

SYSTEM OF FINANCIAL SUPPORT

  • Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA)
  • Pre-accession agricultural instrument (SAPARD)

ONGOING ENLARGEMENT

  • The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • Croatia – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • Turkey – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety
  • Iceland – Agriculture, fisheries and food safety

JANUARY 2007 ENLARGEMENT

  • Bulgaria
  • Romania

MAY 2004 ENLARGEMENT

  • Cyprus
  • Estonia
  • Hungary
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Malta
  • Poland
  • The Czech Republic
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia

Strategy for cooperation with Indonesia

Strategy for cooperation with Indonesia

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Strategy for cooperation with Indonesia

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

External relations > Relations with third countries > Asia

Strategy for cooperation with Indonesia (2007-2013)

Document or Iniciative

The European Commission – Indonesia Strategy Paper 2007-2013 .

Summary

Indonesia has undertaken a process of political and economic stabilisation supported by the European Union (EU). This cooperation strategy also supports the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which remain a priority for a country where the majority of the population lives in poverty.

Priorities for cooperation

Education and vocational training are priority areas of action. EU intervention should contribute to improving basic education systems, vocational training and higher education. The partners’ aim is to increase the level of education and adapt teaching to the needs of sustainable development.

The EU supports the programme of trade and investment reforms, to accelerate the economic performance of the country and allow it to join the international trade system. The social and environmental impact of these reforms must be controlled. They are contributing to the development of a free trade zone between the EU and the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries.

In addition, the operation of the judicial and law enforcement system should be strengthened. To this end, cooperation actions support institutional reforms, good public governance, human rights, the fight against corruption and the fight against organised crime. The role of civil society should be particularly encouraged when carrying out reforms.

Beyond these priorities, the partners put in place a series of thematic actions, in particular for democracy and human rights, support for civil society, food security, asylum policy and migration.

General areas of cooperation

Certain areas must be included in a cross-cutting way within the actions that have been planned by the partnership, such as:

  • protection of the environment, particularly to combat illegal logging;
  • conflict prevention and post-conflict recovery for certain regions;
  • gender equality, including in democratic life;
  • governance, transparency and the management of public finances;
  • human rights and the protection of indigenous people;
  • combating HIV/AIDS;
  • controlling the impact of globalisation on social cohesion and promoting decent work.

Community standards on staging points

Community standards on staging points

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Community standards on staging points

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Animal welfare

Community standards on staging points

Document or Iniciative

Council Regulation (EC) No 1255/97 of 25 June 1997 concerning Community criteria for staging points and amending the route plan referred to in the Annex to Directive 91/628/EEC [See amending acts].

Summary

Control posts (this term replaces the previous ‘staging points’) are places where animals are rested for 12 hours or more, under the rules on journey time restrictions laid down in Annex I to Regulation (EC) No 1/2005. They may only be used to receive, feed, water, rest, accommodate, care for and dispatch animals passing through.

Only animals of the same health status certified in accordance with Community legislation may be present at the same time at control posts.

Each control post must be approved and authorised by the competent authority. Such approval may be limited to particular categories or particular health statuses of animal. This information must be forwarded to the Commission, which draws up a list of control posts.

To be approved, control posts must meet the requirements of Annex I to 1/2005. In particular, the following must be ensured:

  • the premises must be constructed and operated so as to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Suitable and effective cleaning procedures and equipment must also be provided: the premises must be cleaned and disinfected after each use;
  • the premises must have suitable equipment and facilities for loading and unloading animals from the means of transport, in particular a non-slip floor covering and, where necessary, lateral protection;
  • personnel and equipment entering into contact with the animals accommodated must remain exclusively dedicated to the premises concerned unless they have been cleaned and disinfected;
  • animal litter, faeces and urine may not be collected from the premises until they have been appropriately treated to prevent the spread of disease;
  • appropriate sanitary breaks between two consecutive consignments of animals must be observed to allow proper cleaning and disinfection.

Control posts must also be located in areas not subject to prohibition of or restrictions on movement for health reasons.

Control posts are under the authority of an official veterinarian and must undergo regular inspection, at least twice a year, to ensure that the requirements for approval are met.

The use of a control post may be suspended in serious cases, particularly on animal health or welfare grounds. The Member State imposing the suspension must inform the Commission and the other Member States thereof, and it may only lift the suspension after notifying the Commission and the other Member States, stating the reasons.

Where Community legislation is not complied with, the Commission may suspend the use of a control post or withdraw it from the list following on-the-spot checks by experts.

Each passage through a control post must be entered by the official veterinarian in the journey log introduced by Regulation (EC) No 1/2005.

The Regulation may be amended by simplified procedure where the animal health situation so requires.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1255/97 2.7.1997 OJ L 174 of 2.7.1997
Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 1040/2003 9.7.2003 OJ L 151 of 19.6.2003
Regulation (EC) No 1/2005 25.1.2005 OJ L 3 of 5.1.2005

Subsidiarity

Subsidiarity

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Subsidiarity

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Institutional affairs > Building europe through the treaties > The Amsterdam treaty: a comprehensive guide

Subsidiarity

One of the major objectives of the Intergovernmental Conference on the revision of the Treaties was to bring the European Union closer to its citizens by enabling them to understand and influence European integration. A number of Community policies, such as those on consumer protection or employment, will be reformed with this specific goal in mind.

Subsidiarity was another major topic of discussion when the conference considered how better to meet the expectations of the people of Europe. To consolidate this principle, on which the efficiency of the European Union depends, a specific protocol has been annexed to the EC Treaty.

PROTOCOL ON THE PRINCIPLE OF SUBSIDIARITY

In October 1992, the Birmingham European Council confirmed that decisions should be taken as closely as possible to the citizens of the Union in accordance with Article 5 (ex Article 3b) of the EC Treaty. With this in mind, the Edinburgh European Council of December 1992 agreed an overall approach for applying the principle of subsidiarity (basic principles, guidelines, and procedures).

The Protocol on the application of the principles of subsidiarity and proportionality codifies the guidelines adopted by the Edinburgh European Council and gives them force in law. By this means the Member States intend to formalise a number of aspects relating to subsidiarity:

  • subsidiarity is a dynamic concept and the appropriate level for action may vary according to circumstances;
  • all legislative proposals will be accompanied by a statement on the impact of the proposed measure on the application of the principle of subsidiarity;
  • consistent with the proper achievement of the objective, the form of Community action should not be too restrictive (as far as possible, directives should be preferred to regulations);
  • subsidiarity should not undermine the powers conferred on the European Community by the Treaty, as interpreted by the Court of Justice.

The main condition for embarking on Community action is set out in the second paragraph of Article 5 of the EC Treaty, which states that the Community shall take action “only if and in so far as the objectives of the proposed action cannot be sufficiently achieved by the Member States and can therefore, by reason of the scale or effects of the proposed action, be better achieved by the Community”. The Protocol cites three criteria for judging whether this condition has been fulfilled:

  • does the action have transnational aspects that cannot be satisfactorily regulated by the Member States?
  • would action by Member States or lack of action conflict with the requirements of the Treaty?
  • would action at Community level produce clear benefits?

EU-Pacific strategy

EU-Pacific strategy

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about EU-Pacific strategy

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Development > African Caribbean and Pacific states (ACP)

EU-Pacific strategy

Document or Iniciative

Communication from the Commission to the Council, the European Parliament and the European Economic and Social Committee of 29 May 2006 – EU relations with the Pacific Islands – A strategy for a strengthened partnership [COM(2006) 248 – Official Journal C 184 of 8 August 2006].

Summary

The strategy will bring the EU’s relationship with the Pacific into line with the new EU development policy statement adopted by the EU institutions in December 2005 and with the revised Cotonou Agreement of 2005. It will also help put into practice the EU’s commitments to aid effectiveness in the region.

The strategy consists of three components:

  • stronger political relations on matters of common interest such as global political security, trade, economic and social development and the environment;
  • more focused development action, with greater emphasis on regional cooperation to build up critical mass, enhance regional governance and facilitate mutual enrichment;
  • more efficient aid delivery, including greater use of direct budget support and closer coordination with other partners, in particular Australia and New Zealand.

In this strategy, the EU concentrates on sound management and protection of the environment, which are essential to the prosperity of the Pacific region, and takes into account its specific character: some of the islands are small, remote and vulnerable to natural disasters; they also face the challenges of state fragility and weak governance; moreover, their political and economic importance has increased owing to a growing demand for their substantial natural resources (fish, timber, minerals, oil, gas).

As regards strengthening the political dialogue between the EU and the Pacific region, the proposal is to increase contact with the Pacific Islands Forum, which is the main regional institution for political issues. It is also important to conduct a dialogue at national level with key Pacific ACP countries, in accordance with the Cotonou Agreement.

More focused development action

The action will focus on three priorities: governance, regionalism and sustainable management of natural resources.

Drawing on its experience, the EU will help prevention and stabilisation in post-conflict situations and establish good governance by strengthening credible institutions. It will encourage greater compliance with international standards as regards workers and in the fight against corruption, money laundering and terrorist financing.

Regional integration is crucial for an effective development aid strategy. The Pacific needs to strengthen this dimension and the EU will bring added value where it can. It will continue to help the Forum Secretariat and the other Council of Regional Organisations in the Pacific (CROP) agencies, in particular as regards natural resources management, vulnerability and governance.

The EPA (Economic Partnership Agreement) has a catalytic effect on economic cooperation and integration in the Pacific region as it stimulates the Pacific ACP countries to negotiate as a group, open up to each other and improve regional governance. Of the Pacific ACP countries’ total exports, 10 % go to the EU. This is a remarkable figure considering the size of these countries and the physical distance between the Pacific and Europe. In order to maximise the benefits of the EPA, the negotiations are closely coordinated with the programming and implementation of development assistance.

The Commission proposes that the central theme for strengthened cooperation be “blue-green”: that it deal therefore with sustainable management of natural resources and that it support Pacific ACP countries in their action to cope with environmental problems and resource-management issues. This is an area where Europe could contribute with its clearly recognised added value and where it could offer its collective experience and know-how.

The EU can assist these countries in managing their ocean and coastal resources in a sustainable manner through initiatives that could combine the use and conservation of fisheries and marine biodiversity. The new generations of Fisheries Partnership Agreements (FPAs) are an important milestone. They provide regulated access to fishing opportunities for European vessels and envisage close cooperation to promote responsible fishing and ensure conservation and sustainable use of the fishery resources of the partner countries concerned.

To make EU development assistance more efficient, the Commission proposes that assistance should be more concentrated, with a stronger focus at regional level, more efficient use of small-country allocations and greater use of budget support. The proposed concentration will facilitate donor coordination and avoid overlap or inconsistencies between those seeking to achieve common goals.

With a view to a more systematic application of the budget support instrument in its cooperation with the Pacific ACP countries, the EU plans to enter into a dialogue with the International Monetary Fund (the IMF) in order to share analyses, experience and studies.

Furthermore, the EU will proactively assist these countries in meeting the eligibility criteria for budget support, i.e.:

  • a poverty reduction strategy paper (PRSP) or a national development strategy under preparation;
  • a stable macroeconomic framework which is either satisfactory or under reform;
  • transparent and sound public finance management.

Related Acts

Proposal for a Council Decision of 16 December 2008 on the signature and provisional application of the Interim Partnership Agreement between the European Community, of the one part, and the Pacific States, of the other part [COM(2008) 858 final – Not published in the Official Journal].
The European Union and the Pacific States have agreed on the provisional application of the interim agreement providing for the establishment of an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA).

In 2007 the regime of safeguard clauses concerning trade measures contained in the Cotonou Agreement expired as did the World Trade Organization (WTO) waiver covering that regime. In this context, the provisional application of this agreement aims at ensuring the stability of trade between the EU and the signatory States from the Pacific region.

The EPA mainly concerns trade in goods. It lays down the measures necessary to establish a free trade area and deals with questions concerning customs, the facilitation of trade, dispute settlement, the removal of technical barriers, and sanitary and phytosanitary measures.

The agreement provides for the addition of new fields of cooperation when negotiations concerning the adoption of an enlarged EPA take place – in particular cooperation in development, fisheries, services and agriculture.

Youth

Youth

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Youth

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Education training youth sport > Youth

Youth

Youth-focused actions contribute towards the education, training, mobility, vocational and social integration, as well as the development of active citizenship of young people within the European Union (EU). The European Youth Pact (2005) provides support to meet all these challenges. As part of the strategy for employment and social inclusion, the “Youth in Action” programme supports cooperation between the different actors involved in the youth field, encourages exchanges between young people and enables them to participate in voluntary activities in order to develop active citizenship.

GENERAL FRAMEWORK

  • European Youth Pact
  • Youth on the Move
  • A renewed framework for European cooperation in the youth field (2010-18)
  • Youth employment: opportunities
  • EU Youth Strategy
  • Health and well-being of young people
  • Youth mobility
  • Mobility of young volunteers
  • Participation of young people with fewer opportunities
  • Promoting young people’s full participation in education, employment and society
  • Recognition of non-formal and informal learning (in the field of youth)
  • European Year of Voluntary Activities Promoting Active Citizenship (2011)
  • Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency
  • Green Paper on the learning mobility of young people

WHITE PAPER ON YOUTH

  • White Paper on Youth

White Paper follow up

  • European policies concerning youth participation and information
  • Common objectives for voluntary activities
  • Common objectives for a better understanding and knowledge of youth
  • Common objectives for participation by and information for young people
  • Framework of European cooperation in the youth field

Preparatory documents for the White Paper

  • Mobility for students, persons undergoing training, young volunteers, teachers and trainers
  • Promoting young people’s initiative, enterprise and creativity
  • Social inclusion of young people

PROGRAMMES

  • Youth in Action (2007-13)
  • Youth action programme 2000-2006
  • Programme to promote non-governmental organisations active in the youth field (2004 – 2006)

Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Transport > Waterborne transport

Maritime security: Ship and port facility security

Document or Iniciative

Regulation (EC) No 725/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 31 March 2004 on enhancing ship and port facility security [See amending act(s)].

Summary

The main objective of this regulation is to implement European Union (EU) measures aimed at enhancing the security of ships and port facilities in the face of threats of intentional unlawful acts.

The regulation is intended to provide a basis for the harmonised interpretation and implementation and EU monitoring of the special measures to enhance maritime security adopted by the Diplomatic Conference of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) in 2002, which amended the 1974 International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS Convention) and established the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code).

The amendments to the SOLAS Convention and Part A of the ISPS Code are mandatory, but subject to interpretation. Part B of the Code consists of recommendations which the EU countries are called on to implement.

This regulation contains preventive measures and transposes the part of the SOLAS Convention on special measures to enhance maritime security and, at the same time, the ISPS Code, two of the cornerstones of maritime security at world level.

EU countries are required to communicate to the IMO, the Commission and the other EU countries the information requested and the special measures adopted to enhance maritime security under the SOLAS Convention.

Alongside this, each EU country must draw up the list of port facilities concerned on the basis of the port facility security assessments carried out and establish the scope of the measures taken to enhance maritime security. This list must be communicated to the other EU countries and to the Commission by 1 July 2004 at the latest.

EU countries must vigorously monitor compliance with the security rules by ships intending to enter an EU port, whatever their origin.

Security checks in the port may be carried out by the competent maritime security authorities of the EU countries, but also, as regards the international ship security certificate, by inspectors acting in the framework of port State control, as provided for in Directive 95/21/EC.

When a ship announces its intention to enter a port in an EU country, the competent maritime security authority of that country should demand that the information be provided at least 24 hours in advance or, if the voyage time is less than 24 hours, at the latest at the time the ship leaves the previous port or, if the port of call is not known, as soon as the port of call becomes known.

EU countries are required to designate a focal point for maritime security by 1 July 2004 at the latest. This authority should require each ship intending to enter port to provide, in advance, information concerning its international ship security certificate and the levels of safety at which it operates and has previously operated.

EU countries are required to apply the new security measures to international shipping and, by 1 July 2005, to Class A passenger ships operating domestic services.

After a security risk assessment, EU countries must decide the extent to which they will apply, by 1 July 2007, the provisions of this regulation to other categories of ships operating domestic services, their companies and the port facilities serving them.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 725/2004

19.5.2004

OJ L 129 of 29.4.2004

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 219/2009

20.4.2009

OJ L 87 of 31.3.2009

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EC) No 324/2008 of 9 April 2008 laying down revised procedures for conducting Commission inspections in the field of maritime security [Official Journal L 98 of 10.4.2008].

The Commission carries out security inspections at port facilities and companies in EU countries. These inspections are prepared with assistance from the European Maritime Safety Agency and are conducted by inspectors from the EU countries. The Commission must send its inspection report within six weeks of the completion of an inspection. Such reports must detail the findings of the inspection and identify any non-conformity with Regulation (EC) No 725/2004 or Directive 2005/65/EC. They may also contain recommendations for corrective action. The EU country concerned must reply within three months, providing an action plan, specifying actions and deadlines, to remedy any identified shortcomings.

Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Food safety > Veterinary checks animal health rules food hygiene

Intra-Community trade and imports of certain animals and their semen, ova and embryos

Document or Iniciative

Council Directive 92/65/EEC of 13 July 1992 laying down animal health requirements governing trade in and imports into the Community of animals, semen, ova and embryos not subject to animal health requirements laid down in specific Community rules referred to in Annex A(I) to Directive 90/425/EEC [See amending acts].

Summary

The Directive lays down the animal health requirements for the trade and import in the European Union (EU) of live animals, sperm, ova and embryos which are not covered by specific Community legislation (as is already the case for cattle and swine, equidae, sheep and goats, poultry and hatching eggs, certain live ungulates, as well as for aquaculture products).

Species covered by the Directive

The Directive lays down the animal health requirements applicable to trade in zoo animals, ungulates and birds which are not covered by other specific Directives, camelidae, bees, lagomorphs, minks, foxes, etc., as well as the trade in pet animals such as cats, dogs and ferrets. In order to be the subject of trade, ferrets, cats and dogs must meet the conditions provided for in Regulation (EC) No 998/2003 on the non-commercial movement of pet animals. For the latter category of animals, Finland, Ireland, Malta, the United Kingdom and Finland require additional guarantees. They may, for example, in certain cases, keep their national rules on quarantine for animals susceptible to rabies.

The Directive also lays down the animal health requirements applicable to trade in semen, ova and embryos of certain animals like equidae, sheep and goats.

Controls and penalties

Checks are carried out in accordance with the provisions of Council Directive 90/425/EEC applicable to intra-Community trade in live animals and their sperm, ova and embryos.

The Member States must take administrative or penal measures to penalize infringements of the Directive.

Live animals and their sperm, ova and embryos covered by this Directive and coming from third countries are subject to the minimum requirements laid down in Directive 97/78/EEC CEE concerning veterinary checks applicable to products from third countries.

Authorised imports

Imports from third countries are authorized provided they offer guarantees equivalent to those required in intra-Community trade. Conditions concerning the veterinary certificate, checks and transport are laid down, and animals must be quarantined prior to importation.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 92/65/EEC

29.7.1992

1.1.1994

OJ L 268 of 14. 9. 1992

Amending act(s) Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Regulation (EC) No 998/2003

3.7.2003

OJ L 146 of 13. 6. 2003

Directive 2004/68/EC

20.5.2004

19.11.2005

OJ L 139 of 30.4. 2004

Directive 2008/73/EC

3.9.2008

1.1.2010

OJ L 219 of 14.8.2008

AMENDMENTS TO THE ANNEXES

Annex A – Notifiable diseases
Regulation (EC) No 1282/2002 [Official Journal L 187 of 16.7.2002];
Regulation (EC) No 1398/2003 [Official Journal L 198 of 6.8.2003].

Annex C – Conditions governing approval of bodies, institutes or centres
Decision 95/176/EC [Official Journal L 117 of 24.5.1995];
Regulation (EC) No 1282/2002 [Official Journal L 187 of 16.7.2002].

Annex D – Conditions governing semen collection and storage centres and embryo collection and production teams
Decision 95/176/EC [Official Journal L 117 of 24.5.1995];
Regulation (EU) No 176/2010 [Official Journal L 52 of 3.3.2010].

Annex E – Health certificate templates
Regulation (EC) No 1282/2002 [Official Journal L 187 of 16.7.2002];
Decision 2010/270/EU [Official Journal L 118 of 12.5.2010];
Decision 2010/684/EU [Official Journal L 293 of 11.11.2010].

Annex F – Trade and imports of animals, sperm, ova and embryos not subject to specific legislation
Directive 2004/68/EC [Official Journal L 139 of 30.4.2004].

Related Acts

Commission Regulation (EU) No 206/2010 of 12 March 2010 laying down lists of third countries, territories or parts thereof authorised for the introduction into the European Union of certain animals and fresh meat and the veterinary certification requirements [Official Journal L 73 of 20.3.2010].

Commission Regulation (EC) No 1739/2005 of 21 October 2005 laying down animal health requirements for the movement of circus animals between Member States [Official Journal L 279 of 22.10.2005].

Maritime safety: prevention of pollution from ships

Maritime safety: prevention of pollution from ships

Outline of the Community (European Union) legislation about Maritime safety: prevention of pollution from ships

Topics

These categories group together and put in context the legislative and non-legislative initiatives which deal with the same topic.

Environment > Water protection and management

Maritime safety: prevention of pollution from ships

Document or Iniciative

Directive 2002/84/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 November 2002 amending the Directives on maritime safety and the prevention of pollution from ships.

Summary

This Directive aims to improve the implementation of Community legislation on maritime safety, on the prevention of pollution from ships and on shipboard living and working conditions.

The Directive is closely linked to Regulation 2002/2099/EC establishing a Committee on Safe Seas and the Prevention of Pollution from Ships and amending the Regulations on maritime safety and the prevention of pollution from ships.

The aim is to simplify the committee procedures through the replacement of the various committees set up under the Community legislation on maritime safety and the prevention of pollution from ships with a single committee to be known as the Committee on maritime safety and the prevention of pollution from ships.

At the same time, the Directive will seek to speed up and simplify the incorporation of international rules into Community legislation.

This Directive amends the following Directives:

  • Directive 94/57/EC;
  • Directive 95/21/EC;
  • Directive 96/98/EC;
  • Directive 97/70/EC;
  • Directive 98/18/EC;
  • Directive 98/41/EC;
  • Directive 99/35/EC;
  • Directive 2000/59/EC;
  • Directive 2001/25/EC;
  • Directive 2001/96/EC.

References

Act Entry into force Deadline for transposition in the Member States Official Journal
Directive 2002/84/EC [adoption: codecision COD/2000/0237] 29.11.2002 23.11.2003 OJ L 324 of 29.11.2002

Related Acts

Council Directive 94/57/EC of 22 November 1994 on common rules and standards for ship inspection and survey organisations and for the relevant activities of maritime administrations [OJ L 319 of 12.12.1994].

Council Directive 95/21/EC of 19 June 1995 concerning the enforcement, in respect of shipping using Community ports and sailing in the waters under the jurisdiction of the Member States, of international standards for ship safety, pollution prevention and shipboard living and working conditions (port state control) [OJ L 157 of 07.07.1995].

Council Directive 96/98/EC of 20 December 1996 on marine equipment [OJ L 46 of 17.02.1997].

Council Directive 97/70/EC of 11 December 1997 setting up a harmonised safety regime for fishing vessels of 24 metres in length and over [OJ L 34 of 09.02.1998].

Council Directive 98/18/EC of 17 March 1998 on safety rules and standards for passenger ships [OJ L 144 of 15.05.1998].

Council Directive 98/41/EC of 18 June 1998 on the registration of persons on board passenger ships operating to or from ports of the Member States of the Community [OJ L 188 of 02.07.1998, p. 35].

Council Directive 199/35/EC of 29 April 1999 on a system of mandatory surveys for the safe operation of regular ro-ro ferry and high-speed passenger craft services [OJ L 138 of 01.06.1999].

Directive 2000/59/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 November 2000 on port reception facilities for ship-generated waste and cargo residues [OJ L 332 of 28.12.2000].

Directive 2001/25/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 April 2001 on the minimum level of training of seafarers [OJ L 136 of 18.5.2001].

Directive 2001/96/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 4 December 2001 establishing harmonised requirements and procedures for the safe loading and unloading of bulk carriers [OJ L 13 of 16.01.2002].

Directive 2002/59/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 June 2002 establishing a Community vessel traffic monitoring and information system and repealing Council Directive 93/75/EEC [OJ L 208 of 05.08.2002].

Regulation (EC) No 2099/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 November 2002 establishing a Committee on Safe Seas and the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (COSS) and amending the Regulations on maritime safety and the prevention of pollution from ships [OJ L 324 of 29.11.2002].